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'unusual' salvias

Posted by voodoobrew 9 Bay Area, CA (My Page) on
Fri, Sep 18, 09 at 19:44

salvia adenophora: I saw this plant on eBay... is it a real cultivar, or just another name for for some other variety?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: 'unusual' salvias

It is a real species, quite new to the trade. It is from Columbia, a vigorous grower and late bloomer.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

I tried growing adenophora this year. I purchased the plant last fall and overwintered it in my house. It bloomed a few times during the winter. In late winter I started several cuttings and in May planted them all outside. None of them have any flowers buds yet so I won't be getting any flowers from them before we get a frost so they obvsiouly do bloom late. The flowers are beautiful but I guess I'll have to move south if I want to be able to enjoy them outside.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Is the name OK? Adenophora is another genus so shouldn't be used as a species name - but even though it's new to cultivation, maybe it was named before this rule came in. Does it have any other names?


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OK, how about salvia fulgens? Is there *any* source for buying this in the USA?? It's not even on eBay, LOL.


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It is closely related to Salvia amethystina, also from Columbia. Although I have buds on my S. madrensis, there are none yet on my S. adenophora.

It is permitted to use a name for a species that is already in use for a genus, as far as I know.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Not by RHS rules in Britain, but don't know how far their tentacles extend....!


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Oh my GOD, I need help, LOL. I went to a botanical garden today that had loads of "rare" (at least in the trade) salvias, ALL blooming, except for S. gesneriiflora (is California crazy, or what?). It was all I could do to resist not taking cuttings, seeds... Some of them, I had never even heard of before. S. evansiana, anyone? The "Jean's Purple Passion" was literally a tree.

There were hummingbirds all over the place. I don't know how the GW folks in the U.K. can love salvias without their accompanying hummers! :) Seems they co-evolved together!

Well, it was a good day, and I still have a lot to learn.


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Rich, Salvia adenophora is actually from Oaxaca in Mexico, not Colombia. Also note the spelling of COLOMBIA, it is not COLUMBIA...we don't want people to think that Salvias are found in the wild in north-west Canada!

Salvia hydrangea is another species with a name of another genus.

Salvia evansiana is a Chinese species, which frequently gets muddled with other Chinese species.

My 'Jean's Purple Passion' is almost a tree, as are S. regla, S. concolor, S.'Costa Rican Blue' and S. cuspidata subsp. gilliesii. We don't have hummers, but I have seen the hummingbird hawk-moth several times.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Sorry about that. I got Salvia ampelophylla (from Colombia) confused with S. adenophora.

The latter has flowers that are supposed to be about half as long as S. disjuncta, another species related to S. gesneriflora.

The S. disjuncta from Strybing (now the San Francisco Botanical Garden)and S. leucantha x Phyllis Fancy are both reliably hardy in North Carolina. Now I will have to find out if the S. disjuncta from Logees Greenhouses is also hardy.

Robin, how hardy are your tree-like sages? For us in North Carolina, S. regla from Jame, Coahuila dies back each year and does not get to develop a sizable caliper. The parent tree that I collected the seed from was around 30 feet tall, and had a diameter of around 4-5 inches.


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Regla, cuspidata subsp. gilliesii, and concolor are all hardy here, the 1st two being deciduous. 'Jean's Purple Passion' and 'Costa Rican Blue' are a bit dodgy.

All other guaraniticas are pretty hardy where I live, the tenderness and late-flowering of 'Costa Rican Blue' does indicate that it could be a hybrid.

Disjuncta is not hardy with me, but as it is winter-flowering, I keep it in a pot, under glass in winter. Phyllis Fancy is more or less hardy.

Adenophora has smallish flowers, but millions of them on very long, sprawling stems. Quite a beauty.


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Would disjuncta also be winter flowering in California? If so, I need to find it. I'm starting to get nervous that I won't have enough hummingbird food this winter (Anna's hummers will stay, if there is food). I really don't want to buckle and get a feeder! I've always liked salvias, but now I have become somewhat "obsessed" after watching all the hummers in my garden. Can you guys recommend other winter blooming salvias [CA "winter", specifically]? My list thus far (from scouring the internet) is :

dorisiana
gesneriiflora
iodantha
semiatrata
involucrata
madrensis
karwinskii
Waverly

Please correct it if wrong, and feel free to add to it. "Unusual" is great, as long as I can buy it! I do order plants online, as local nurseries don't tend to carry what I am looking for. Annie's is all out, and I missed the UCB (my alma mater :) Botanical Garden fall sale, argh. There are a couple more Strybing sales coming up; unfortunately the Cabrillo salvia sale isn't until spring. thank you!


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Salvia Melissodora blooms till frost here in Texas.


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You may want to add ,purpurea, microphylla and
greggii,coccinea,rutilans bloom here if protected from freezes.
Art


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I had one S chiquita that bloomed through winter last year.


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OK, I have just acquired only several seeds each of both S. disjuncta and S. indica. Any special tips i should know to germinate these? Also, should I wait until spring?


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I'd wait until spring. You will need warmth for these to prosper as small seedlings.


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Voodoobrew, my S. curviflora has a lot of flowers in fall, into winter, Southern California


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Thanks for the tips, everyone. Whitechampaca, S. curviflora was a tough one to find! I just bought some seeds for it, along with seeds for S. muirii and S. lavanduloides.

Yesterday I bought a S. Frieda Dixon (elegans x ?) plant at a college sale, and I really love it! I have decided that I need more pink in my garden. :)

They had a salvia in their gardens which looked similar to "Stephanie" on Robin's site. Is there another that looks like this? It looked like a S. greggii; flowers were cream on bottom, purple/pink on top. very nice!

I bought another plant that they weren't sure what it was... tag says "S. mexicana x gesneriflora ??". I think it may be a Purple Majesty.


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"S. mexicana x gesneriflora" should be Raspberry Truffle, ans will look like S. gesneriflora, but bloom earlier with a black raspberry colored flower. It is Andy Maycen's hybrid

S. Frieda Dixon is a sport of the common elegans.


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This flower is not raspberry colored; it's a blue-purple (with darker calyces). The foliage is somewhat lime-green.

Does anyone know the parentage of S. Marwin Gardens? see link

Here is a link that might be useful: photo


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S. Marwin Gardens looks a lot like S. karwinskii. Marwin Gardens is in the same general area as Cabrillo and Sierra Azul and Suncrest Nurseries in Watsonville. Not much on this sage on Google.


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Yes, the only thing that I found was that Sandi's garden is called "Marwin Gardens"... and that you guys took a tour of it at a recent Cabrillo Summit.

So, how does one go about getting invited to the Cabrillo Summit? :)


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The folks at Cabrillo are going to have to do more with a lot less, since they are state funded. Don't expect another Salvia Summit in the near future unless some other institution can step in with funding to assist Cabrillo.


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That is too bad about Cabrillo. :(

Well, my mystery salvia from Merritt College is setting seed, so now I really do not know what it is. It looks just like Purple Majesty or Jean's Purple Passion, but those are supposedly sterile.


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Can anyone comment on growth conditions for Salvia collinsii? I should have asked at SF Botanical, where I bought it, but I figured I'd find info on the internet. The only comments about it are on Robin's site, but he grew it in a greenhouse. On the tag it says "oak woodland". If this means I can grow it under my CA oak tree (full shade, dry), that would be fantastic, as not much else grows there. It looks like it's going to bloom soon (winter); is this normal? Also, will it really get 7 feet tall?! thanks


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Well, it will be very interesting to see how Salvia collinsii performs in a different climate. It seemed to like some shade. But I did find it very disappointing, far too big, and very small flowers, not many at any one time. I understand there is are pink or pale blue forms, but mine was a rather dirty white.

Good luck, let's hope it will grow well for you.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Several years ago I was able to acquire seeds of salvia subrotunda before it was available on the market from a member of a forum. It seems this plant was discovered in the Iguassu Falls region of Brazil and Argentina and I thought I read that John Catlain[spelling] was credited with the discovery, not sure if thats correct. Im just wondering who acquired the plant in the first place to pass the seeds around,, could it possibly have been Robin M. ? subrotunda puts out loads of seed so I can see how they could be shared.


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John Nolan of Lenexa, KS was the collector of Salvia subrotunda. He is a hummingbird enthusiast.


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I was sent seeds 2 or 3 years ago from a kind lady in the US.


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Thank you all for listing these rare Salvia species and strains. I've gotta resarch them all.

I'd like to add my favorite.. if not most aromatic of all Salvias i've every encountered.

the California Native: Salvia Spathacae.

I love my Gesneriflora, but the Spathacae is just out of this world. My friends grow them in colder northern climates, ie, Seattle. But it just flourishes here along the Coast of California (its native habitat). the Salvia Mellica and Clevelandii are impressive, too.


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Today, for the first time, I saw the giant S. wagneriana blooming in a local botanical garden. WOW WOW. The foliage doesn't look anything like my much smaller version wag. 'White Bract'. Another first for me, S. holwayi, also WOW. The madrensis and the iodantha were blooming - lovely. I saw what I believe was a guaranitica which was over 7 feet tall. The ges. Tequila was blooming, and was the size of a large tree... incredible. They had hacked a lot of salvias back to the ground (still blooming!), so I grabbed some free cuttings from the piles, figuring that would be OK. :)

I saw what looked just like S. chiapensis, but the leaves were smaller and it was a large, woody bush. Could it be something else? There was what looked to be an involucrata, but shorter & wider than I've seen, and darker flowers. Not sure what that was.

Anyway, I'm getting better at ID-ing some of these, just in a matter of months. Finding this forum has helped a lot, thank you.


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Which botanic garden was that? Strybing (now San Francisco BG) and UC Berkeley are my favorites to visit when I get to the Bay Area.


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It's Oakland Botanical, a little secret tucked away at Lake Merritt. They have a huge salvia area... with plenty of unusual (in the trade) varieties. Believe me, it's been all I can do to not to take cuttings, so today was pretty exciting that it was "hack day". :) I will admit to taking seeds in the past... I hope that isn't wrong. Check it out next time you visit... it's lovely and not very well known. Fairyland for kids (Disney copied it!) is across the way, and the horticulturalist there sells plants, many of which can be found in the Botanical Garden. I've acquired many of my oddball salvias from her.


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Voodoobrew just breakdown and get the Hummingbird feeders. Last year my Salvia Hot Lips bloomed till Chrismas, with this and 2 feeders I was able to to keep about 4 resident Anna's all year. This year my Hot Lips blooms were blackened about 2 weeks ago ,however, I now have 8 feeders and have been able to maintain about 2 dozen resident Ann's and Rufous because of the extra feeders


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I finally did "cave" and got a feeder... it hasn't been used yet, as far as I can tell. Collecting salvias is much more fun than refilling feeders, anyway. I am a gardener at heart; the bird feeding came as a secondary hobby. ;)

Let's see if I can finally manage to post an image of Sparky, a very aggressive Anna's who spends his days keeping other hummers off of "his" property.

[IMG]http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa72/mich_lovett/SparkyHead-1.jpg[/IMG]

Here is a link that might be useful: my favorite


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

  • Posted by jaybirdy 5north/central Illin (My Page) on
    Thu, Dec 24, 09 at 13:23

I have two feeders.One on the north side of the house and one on the south.That agressive hummer can only see and guard one at a time so the other hummers can gain access to the other one.It is a pain having to clean and fill them every three days;but it's no more time consuming than collecting seeds or starting cuttings.I was wondering .I wanted to try growing Marwin Gardens here in zone 5.Would itact like an annual here and reseed itself like coccinia and subrotunda?How hardy is it.I can't find very much information about it on the web.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Robin, the S. collinsii has just started to bloom! You are right, the flowers are on the small side, but they are a pretty shade of lilac. They look like the picture in the link below, which someone took at the Cabrillo Summit. There is not much info about this salvia on the web!

In other news, I have a fully blooming S. iodantha, and my resident Anna's hummingbird hasn't touched it. I don't get it! Nancy N (of hummer fame) says they love this plant... and it IS winter (i.e. not a ton in bloom). Plus, he keeps cheating and taking nectar from calyces (e.g. of my pulchella/univercillata X karwinskii, S. g. Tequila, etc) and so I guess that means no seed from those plants? Well, there are some very odd looking insects on the iodantha, so maybe there's hope for pollination, after all.

Here is a link that might be useful: Salvia collinsii


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voodoobrew:

Where did the S. collinsii come from, Strybing? It is from Chiapas, and might have been a previously unidentified collection of Dennis Breedlove. Or is it a new collection?


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The S. collinsii indeed came from Strybing, their last sale of the year (everything half price). The plant is fairly mature, even though it's still in a pot; it's quite tall, and the woody base is thick. I need to plant it, but I tend to put salvias near the kitchen window (if they are flowering when I buy them), so I can enjoy the hummingbird show.

I have another question... The foliage on my S. pulchella X involucrata from Annie's is nearly black, even though it seems otherwise healthy (it's blooming). Is this normal in winter? The foliage was dark green when I got it a couple of months ago. It was newly planted out when we had frost, but I covered it.

One more: is there a special trick for collecting seed from S. corrugata? The calyces are really tight in a bunch, and I can't seem to find the right time to collect seed, if any. My hummingbirds love it, so I presume it is being pollinated (blooming now).

thanks


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My Salvia univerticillata (pulchella) and my puberula (probably the plant that was called involucrata) are both showing burgundy pigmentation since moving into the greenhouse. After the chlorophyll bleaches out, the foliage on most is still on the burgundy side.

As to collecting seed, the calyxes will fatten up, turn tan, then the mouth will no longer be pinched and open up. You should see the nutlets at that time, and they should be ripe enough to collect when they turn dark tan. When they get black, they will fall out of the calyx, and they may then be shaken out into a bag.

Let me know if these sages do set seed.


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Thanks for your responses, Rich. I've seen S. corrugata seed for sale, so I hope I can manage to collect some. I really like the flower color and the foliage.

Today I took a stroll through Strybing after my dentist appt in S.F., and good grief... they certainly have a lot of salvias. Plenty are in bloom right now; the S. purpurea was very impressive, and ENORMOUS. The iodantha, gesnerifloras and wagnerianas were of course impressive in winter. Quite a few were blooming, that I would not have expected in January. I'll be interested to see what my karwinskii looks like, as I know the flower color can be variable. Strybing's is light pink, with foliage that is much greener than mine (which is more silver).

I saw the lovely micrantha (Yucatan sage) in person, which was nice since I recently acquired seed. There were some hybrids that I hadn't heard of... e.g. tubiflora X involucrata, I think?? I really need to take notes, next time. LOL

The S. mexicana Huntington form was in full swing... wow. Now I really want that one. Too bad CA land is so expensive... I need more space! :)


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California native Salvia pachyphylla is a crazy beautiful plant, especially the flowers. The scent is one of the most enticing of the CA natives and I have it growing 3 miles from the coast on a southwest facing piece of land. They say that out of its habitat that it doesn't live long, which is true although I have the original plant that I purchased 8 years ago. A plant well worth sniffing out.


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@ voodoobrew:
Bay Area? Where are you? I have a 1 gallon S. mexicana 'Huntington' if you want it (looking scrappy - needs a home!). I worked with Jean Coria at Strybing growing salvias for many years...have some interesting babies crammed into my tiny Oakland backyard if you want cuttings, etc.

yours,
Jonathan


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I went to the Oakland Botanical garden today, and the Salvia dorisiana had set seed! I was under the impression that this salvia did not produce seed. I took a few. :)

There was what I believe to be a Salvia microphylla, which is taller than I am (= 6 feet), flowering in mostly shade. Any ideas which that could be? The flowers were red-fuchsia.


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Today I picked up Salvia rubiginosa at UCB Botanical. I also bought the darker form of S. fallax that they have growing there (in nearly full shade). Very nice: foliage with purple undersides, stems and calyces also dark purple. Yay!


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Forgot one: I picked up a Salvia cinnabarina yesterday, too. There isn't much on the web about this... it's not even on Robin's site! I seem to recall that it is somewhat "thugish", so I intend to plant it in a difficult spot (poor soil, etc). Will that keep it at bay? ;) It looks like it might do well in a very tall planter, as the stems are already quite long. I read it grows 18" tall by 6 feet wide. Looks like a good hummingbird salvia.


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Cinnabarina is like elegans on steroids, with a lot of trailing, robust growth. I think it might have some kudzu genes in it.


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Be careful with S. cinnabarina, especially if you are in a frost-free area, as it will spread like mad and root everywhere! In England it dies in winter, having spread across half the garden! Two other Salvias which spread all over the place are S. scutellariodes and S. procurrens. The latter is quite hardy.

I believe that there is an upright form of S. cinnabarina also.


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Recently published Salvia coriana (named for my friend Jean, who named 'Hotlips' to the outrage of some...)
Might be a little while before we can get this one, though!

Here is a link that might be useful: Article describing Salvia coriana


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jonopp

I really like the colour of S. coriana as shown on your link.

Robin - are you familiar with this species?


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One of the authors is located at the University of Texas. In the field, they infrequently collect seed, since they time their visits for blooming, not fruit set. However, descriptions of fruit or seed is part of the taxonomic definition.


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Jim,

No, never heard of it. But if it anything like S. recurva, we would need glasshouses of Wisley proportions!


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RE: 'unusual' salvias - S. coriana

Re: Salvia coriana availability... I expect Taylor Quedensley, the co-author and namer of the species, will make seed available as soon as he can (if he hasn't already). I presume Strybing will be on the short list, because of his strong ties there, and because it's a tribute to Jean Coria, who worked there...


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RE: 'unusual' salvias-cinnabarina

I second the above re: S.cinnabarina. Also, in SF at least, it doesn't bloom enough to include it in a small garden (you'll just wonder why you planted that green monster) It IS pretty when it does bloom...


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I will be looking for S. coriana as well. It looks nice! As for S. cinnabarina, I recently bought it from UCB, and oh my how it's already taken off... My yard is full, but the good news is that we are poised to buy an acre lot about a block from my house. It will be PERFECT to start my own arboretum/ rare plant nursery. Wish us luck... houses are cheap right now in CA. Anyone wanting to talk me out of this hare-brained idea, feel free. :-)


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Well, when I got cinnabarina from UCB in the late 70s, it became a real weed on the sandy loam of my parent's garden. I almost needed a machete to hod it back.

Good luck with the new lot.


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First I will get in touch w/the Botanist from U.T. see if
they have some growing or seed for distribution of S.coriana. I will keep you all posted.
Art


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RE: 'unusual' salvias- S. coriana

@Art - I facebooked Taylor Quedensley: there's no seed in the offing. Maybe if he takes time off from playing with his kids, he'll go back down to Guate!

Jon.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Jon:
Have you been in touch w/Mario Veliz Perez @ University of
San Carlos of Guatemala ?
Art


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I am the proud new owner of Salvia gracilis (see link), which originally came from Western Hills Nursery (recently purchased again after foreclosure, hooray!). There isn't much info on this salvia. Can anyone tell me how big it will get? I do have it in shade, as suggested by the seller. I don't want to kill this plant, as I've never seen it elsewhere! I have tried to take a cutting, but I don't think it's going to make it... weather here has been VERY hot.

Here is a link that might be useful: S. gracilis


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Voodoobrew,

This Salvia has caused some confusion in Europe (along with countless others!) and it is thought that the name Salvia gracilis is invalid. I first got it some years ago as S. gracilis.....but apparently, this is an incorrect synonym for S. carnea, totally different plant. Christian Froissart is certain that it is Salvia ionocalyx.

It is a very nice Salvia, with purple flowers which match the underside of the foliage. It definitely likes to be in shade, as do almost all Salvias with purple foliage. Here it will grow to 4-5 ft, can be a bit straggly, and flowers throughout the winter months where it is frost-free. It also sets seeds sometimes. Watch out for aphids, they seem to like this Salvia.

Good luck with this Salvia. Where it is happy, it is a gem.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias Salvia carnea ('gracillis')

We tried to propagate this - what we called Salvia gracilis - at Strybing (they may still have it...), although it never left the lath-house. I think it was in the 'cool' greenhouse all winter, as well. Whiteflies! We had trouble selling it, but kept it going out of love.

We also had a 'Salvia gracilis (green form)' that was a completely different animal...fuzzy, bright green lfs, blue fls, and much stouter. Pics:

Is there such a thing as S. gracilis?


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Jon, that looks like it could be Salvia myriantha (I have this plant). Does (did?) the foliage have an 'unpleasant' odor?

Another salvia that is in doubt on Robin's site is S. tubifera. I just bought one at the UCBerkeley sale, and it's gorgeous. Well, at least *I* think so. :) The flowers do look like the photo on Robin's site, but a MUCH darker burgundy (not red).

Another question: UCB sells a "chamaedryoides X microphylla", which I bought. Is there any other known hybrid of this other than X Christine Yeo?


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RE: 'unusual' salvias: chamaedry.Xmicro

Hey voodoo:
All I can say about the above "gracilis green" (aka myriantha)pictured, was that it died before I found a home for it...

We called Robin's S. tubifera 'S.tubiflora'(wrong, apparently). It was a big, green thing - not super showy, and we didn't bother selling it. (It's real - or new - name was discussed somewhere else here...I've forgotten it! Or I'm confused again: the thread was probably about tubiflora vs. oppositiflora.)

I'm pretty far out of the loop now...going on memories several years old. (the name-wrangling and botany were never my dearest interest, anyway...)

I wanted to grow chamaedryoides X microphylla, but never have...also 'Marine Blue', which you probably know...further than that I don't know any other crosses. Ever try cedrosensis or thymoides? Dorii?

J


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Jon, I have not yet tried cedronensis nor thymoides -- I have yet to see them for sale! I've tried dorii, and I killed it. My thumb is quite green, but now I seem to have acquired way too many "precious" plants to keep track of, and this happens. It happens more often to plants that need STELLAR drainage, as I have amended clay.

Today I got really depressed over the fact that my Passiflora parritae (extinct in the wild, was my holy grail, along with Deppea slendens), which was doing GREAT, got broken at the base by some beast who also dragged a LARGE bag of rocks all the way across my deck. This had to be a 50+ lb. raccoon, or a mountain lion, LOL.

Anyhoo, I wanted to report that after acquiring the mystery salvia hybrid (Cabrillo College) called "Marwin Gardens", it is my amateur feeling that the parents are karwinskii and wagneriana. Mine hasn't bloomed yet, but the pictures (see link) look like karwinskii, while the foliage/ stem/ overall appearance of the plant looks very much like wagneriana.

p.s. Richard, if you are reading this, check your email! I finally got around to checking the address that I use for this forum, and replied to your S. grewiifolia mail. Thanks!

Here is a link that might be useful: Salvia


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What are the chances that S. polystachya will come back after being broken at the base? There are only a couple of nodes above soil, no leaves. I will try to root what broke.

Argh! I really need to learn my lesson not to plant things out when they are too small. Raccoons have been wreaking havoc in my garden! Lots of broken plants. Sigh!


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Polystachya should come back, it is quite vigorous.

Raccoons??? We don't have them in England. Beautiful creatures though! I saw one run through a restaurant in Yosemite 2 years ago, hilarious!


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I think Sandy Mush Herb Farm has S. thymoides, which I need to get back for myself.


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Yes Robin, raccoons (and opossums). I have tried to garden for wildlife, but I must also say that I understand why gardeners label things as 'pests'. I found a few more young plants broken at the base today, including the lovely Salvia "Phyllis' Fancy", which I have been waiting to see in bloom for quite some time. AARRGH!! Boy, I hope that I can root this one. Clearly I need to wait until my plants are *much* wider at the base before I plant them out. This means more ugly 1 gallon containers all over my yard. I don't even want to think about the damage that the mountain lions could inflict on the new property we are thinking of purchasing! Wild turkeys and squirrels can also give me a headache. I see the point about only planting natives... they have evolved to deal with the fauna.

Don't get me started on the field mice who invaded my garage for seeds....


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RE: 'unusual' salvias Animals

Raccoons! I understand they're becoming a problem in Germany...surprised they aren't in the UK, yet. (We're always hearing about alien species taking over California, I guess we've exported a few, too!) They're "cute", as long as they aren't attacking your pets (they aren't nice to cats), etc.

On an even more serious note: WATCH OUT for raccoon feces!!! I've heard it can carry a nasty brain fever.

Jonathan


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

My Salvia X 'Mr. Jules' has started blooming. There is almost no information on the web about this plant, thought to be a hybrid of fulgens X holwayi which came from the UCSC arboretum. It's very interesting... bright red inflated flowers, with a very recurved lower lip.

I've had problems posting photos here, so if you want to see pictures, send me an email.

Another unusual one that I like which is blooming now is S. chinensis "Nanjinga". The flowers are very small, but light up a shady area well.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

My Salvia gracilis, originally from the famed Western Hills Nursery, is now blooming. I can email pictures to anyone interested. Supposedly this is the "real" S. gracilis.

It's not a very robust plant, but hopefully I can keep it alive!


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

I can't wait for this doggone cold to go away. All of my plants are in hibernation.

I've discovered a number of unusual horticultural features about Salvia oxyphora that I will cover in a new thread.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Soon I will be the proud owner of the rare Salvia sessilifolia, from Madagascar. It seems that the seller is Dylan Hannon from the Huntington Botanical Gardens, so it should be the real thing.

Hope I can meet its growing requirements!


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Well.........this is one of the world's most rare and endangered Salvia species. I knew that Dylan and/or Scott Zona had found this beauty in Madagascar, but I thought that the plants failed in the USA......so maybe not??? No idea what conditions it needs, possibly warm and humid, unless from a high elevation. There is a photo from Dylan on my site...www.robinssalvias.com it is awesome! Wishing you the best of luck with this..........Robin. PLEASE keep us informed!!!!


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Hi Robin! Oh boy, I guess I'd better take extra good care of this one! I'll keep you updated. Here was the description and photos:

"Salvia sessilifolia, a remarkable sage from Madagascar available here for the first time anywhere. There are a handful of salvias in Madagascar; as far as I know this is the only one in cultivation. In its disjunct distribution it is something of a counterpart to Pelargonium caylae, also from southern montane Madagascar. This is a full and leafy shrubby plant about 3ft tall that branches from the base. It enjoys full sun and grows well outdoors in the Los Angeles area. Note the rugose venation (intricately sunken veins) and white-woolly undersides of the leaves, indicating an adaptation to a dry environment. This is a mountain dweller in habitat and not a hot growing tropical species. Sale item (photos 4-5) is a rooted cutting that will be shipped in its pot. Originally gathered in Madagascar near Itremo, Lavranos 31926."

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RE: 'unusual' salvias

  • Posted by wcgypsy 10 / Sunset 23 (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 25, 12 at 22:57

Wonderful. I wonder if they will have any coming up for sale at the Huntington. My neighbor's son works the Huntington Gardens..maybe I should be friendlier to her...lol..


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RE: 'unusual' salvias, S. libanensis

I just clapped eyes on Salvia libanensis at the Strybing Nursery. I guess it's a new arrival from Colombia, and boy is it s-e-x-y! Fuzzy pale green lfs with reddish veins, reminiscent of dorisiana in scale/furriness; fuzzy red calices and vermillion flowers! The leaf spacing and flower spikes put Tibouchina heteromala in mind... Haven't seen it in the ground yet - looks like it might be 6 feet or taller...hope they have some to sell by the end of Summer!

(btw, that sessilifolia looks pretty cool, too! Wis I had more space!)


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Both of these sages may do well in the southeastern US. S. sessilifolia is related to S. somaliensis, but may be durable enough for the SE US, since it comes from the southern mountains.

S. libanensis is a relative of S. regla, S. sessei, S. pubescens and S. betulifolia from the Santa Marta Mountains of northern Colombia, a disjunct range capping the northern range of the Andes. I believe it is a plant sacred to the indigenous natives.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Sessilifolia related to somalensis? That seems strange.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

It appears I mis-remembered the text from Hedges' treatment of Salvias of Africa. Somaliensis is in species group J with S. perrieri, which is found in Madagascar. These two sages are distinct without obvious allies.

Sessilifolia is in sub group B, all from Madagascar, and all are also a very distinct group without allies. Other species include S. cryptocladia, S. porphyrocalyx, and S. leucodermis.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

I found this salvia growing in a public co-op type of garden [median strip on an Oakland street]. It was right next to a S. Anthony Parker and looked similar in every respect, except that flower coloration was uniformly much lighter. I really don't believe it's S. Phyllis' Fancy... too blue. New hybrid??

I did take cuttings, figuring it was OK being in one of those "guerrilla" type gardens. I will go back for some better photos and possibly more cuttings.


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Certainly not Phyllis Fancy...this may be yet another lovely hybrid. But if it is winter-flowering, as Anthony Parker is in England, sad waste of time for us Brits!


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RE: 'unusual' salvias

Yes, it's winter flowering, and a large shrub. It will make some CA hummingbirds happy. :)

Here is another winter flowerer, from my garden. It's called only "Salvia sp." now; Kathy N. at Cabrillo found it while on a plant expedition.


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