Return to the Seed Saving Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
storing seeds

Posted by archoo16 5B (My Page) on
Mon, Jun 18, 12 at 22:19

Hi. I received some seeds of ridgegourd and Indian brinjal(eggplant) which I want to sow next year. what temps should i store them in. I also have some dwarf zinnia, dwarf daisy and dwarf nasturium seeds ( balcony gardener here :-D ) I got on sale yesterday which I want to use next year. How best can I store them? Any help would be appreciated.

I was thinking the eggplants and ridgegourd will Not like refridgeration, but correct me if I am wrong.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: storing seeds

I'm not really an expert but I have a ton of seeds which most of them have to wait about a year or two after I get them(I have a seed addiction and am always buying more! I cant stop) But I am pretty sure you can store all your seeds in the fridge, but you might want to wait for someone else's opinion with that. Make sure they are dry, when I save my own seeds I leave them to dry on a paper towel for about a month then put them in plastic bags, this way no moisture gets in, and if for some reason I leave the seeds outside they wont get wet. I'm not telling you to put them in plastic bags but just in case you save your own! haha


 o
RE: storing seeds

:-D I do, I have some clarkia, bachelor's buttons , virginia stock , cosmos and annual baby's breath. I am waiting for the pods, now. Btw when do you collect bachelor's button's? I was waiting for a pod to mature, it looked greenish and not even remotely brown. We had some rain, and the next day it was all open , seeds well scattered :'( I dont want to remove it before its mature. Any idea about them?


 o
RE: storing seeds

The professional long term storage areas, Norway's being most famous, are in caves where the temperatures are in the 50s, that would be F.


 o
RE: storing seeds

oooh! I learn some thing new everytime I visit this site :-D Thanks albert_135. As I am busy at the moment, Norway's out. I'll just stick them (seeds) in my fridge.


 o
RE: storing seeds

hmm not super sure about bachelors buttons? I grew them last year, I loved them! Had them in a pot with pansies(somehow they mad it through last year, maybe cause it was a colder summer) and the bachelor buttons were spilling over the edge, it was so pretty! Anyways, I tried collecting the seeds, but I got confused since I couldnt remember what they looked like and didnt know how to collect them. Also they didnt come back for me, so maybe even if the seeds scattered they might not be hardy, and I'm in zone 8 so hopefully you are able to save the seeds! Sorry I'm such a rambler...


 o
RE: storing seeds

you are supposed to wait till the petals in the flower head dry and drop off on their own. The part where the petals join is the pod which becomes dry and brown . remove it from the plant and dry it inside beofre putting it in a paper envelope and store cool and dry. They look like tiny oblong greyish white things with hairy tops.

My problem with them is they dont seem to turn brown, but open before i collect them and scatter the seeds. You should see the pics in seedsite.uk website.


 o
RE: storing seeds

Oh okay thanks for the tips! Maybe put like some tinfoil over spent flowers(pick the petals off), then you dont forget its there and when the pods opens you dont lose the seeds? I do that with my pansies


 o
RE: storing seeds

tht should work, thanks Gloxonialover. I have them tagged by their color. I'll put the foil over the pods.


 o
RE: storing seeds

Dry and Cool! the refrigerator is good for storing seeds, but they MUST be kept in an airtight (glass!) jar. the reason is that the fridge is very humid, and plastic of any form will 'breathe' and allow the humidity to reach your seeds.

a safer bet is in a dark closet. eggplant, like all other seeds, should be stored in a cool & dry place.

winston


 o
RE: storing seeds

Thanks Winston!


 o
RE: storing seeds

My return to vegetable gardening started with an urge 3 years ago and no follow through... until this spring. I bought heirloom seeds in individual small plastic bags and put them all in mason jars and put them in the FREEZER. Was this a good thing? Well, three years later I decide to get back to my plan to start gardening again. I figure I'll have a low germination rate and maybe even have to buy seed all over again. Wrong! Not a single seed has failed! Tomatoes, cucumbers, eggplant, lettuce, raddish, carrot, beet, butterscotch beans, cabbage, spinach, and broccoli so far. I am saving a bit of seed from everything (well, I'm not sure about the biennial beets and carrots just yet) and I plan to use the exact same storage technique since it worked out so well for me.


 o
RE: storing seeds

  • Posted by remy 6WNY (My Page) on
    Thu, Aug 16, 12 at 10:52

The freezer is a good place IF you are only taking your seeds out once or twice a year. You must also make sure they are completely dry before freezing, have them in an airtight container, and let the container come to room temp before opening. Properly frozen seeds will last pretty much forever. But taking them in and out a lot is not good as temp swing are not good and chances for moisture problems could occur. The fridge would follow suit on the freezer rules.
If you are trading seeds, and handling them often, the best place is a dry, cool, and dark place. A closet/drawer in a room that doesn't get hot and humid like on the north side of your home is ideal.
Most seeds kept like this will last 5 years or more. A few types of seeds do not last long. Thankfully there are only a few like onions.
Also there are a few seeds that can not be stored long term. They need to be planted immediately upon harvest/kept moist like some spring woodland plants and some fruits like apple or lime, but again those are more unusual and do not follow the regular seed norms.
Remy


 o
RE: storing seeds

Store in a glass jar in a dark cool place. You do not have to store seeds in a fridge. Seeds MUST be dry prior to storage. Dry seed in the shade, never in the sun, but it should be 100 degrees for at least 6 hours or more to achieve the proper "dryness". This can be done in an oven. Yes, I'm serious.

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/garden/07221.html

Here is a link that might be useful: Colorado State Extension


 o
RE: storing seeds

  • Posted by remy 6WNY (My Page) on
    Sat, Aug 18, 12 at 23:17

I do not recommend doing the oven thing with seeds only for the fact of something going wrong. Also for the average person, letting the seed dry for a few weeks on paper towels on plate before putting away works just fine. I also recommend storing in paper envelops not plastic.
Then storing in a dry, cool, and dark area of the home woks just fine. As I said before, most seeds will last 5 years or more store that way.
Remy


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Seed Saving Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here