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fruit trees from pits

Posted by wiringman ZONE 4 (My Page) on
Thu, Aug 18, 11 at 17:51

does anyone have some good advice as to how to grow trees from pits.

i got some sweet little apricots and i saved the pits i would like to grow some as i like them better then the big ones.

Dean


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RE: fruit trees from pits

Same here, I would love it if someone imparted that knowledge on me too. I don't want to high jack this thread from you, but I have some peach pits and I was wondering if I needed 2 trees to pollinate each other for the fruit to grow. Any info would help me too.


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RE: fruit trees from pits

  • Posted by remy 6WNY (My Page) on
    Fri, Aug 19, 11 at 8:49

Peaches and apricots started from their pits, may not turn out to be much like the parent fruit that you liked. With fruit trees like peaches, apricots, apples, etc. the blossoms get cross pollinated to form a fruit so each fruit will have a different genetic makeup. For a variety you like, it is best to buy a tree or get a cutting to grow your own.
That being said, you can grow a tree from the pit if you want. You have to keep fruit tree pits moist to germinate, so the flesh should not be removed from an apricot or peach until ready to plant. If the flesh is already gone, you need to keep the pit moist in a paper towel and baggie.
You then have to plant the pit in a pot. Then you have to keep the pot cold for awhile in a fridge, oh for at least a month for apricots, longer for peaches, and then you have to keep it at about 70 degrees for awhile to get it to germinate.
You can winter sow them which is much easier.
Remy


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RE: fruit trees from pits

Mr. Kyle Gush can help you. He helped me last year. The development of nature is the focus Kyle Gush of Pin Valley NY. He gaves many peoples advices for growing trees.


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RE: fruit trees from pits

Hey,
It is important to remember that many fruit trees are grafted. The DNA found within the pit is that of the root base. This is typically a less inferior tree that produces lesser quality fruit. The base is usually from a strong tree that can root well. The more superior tree stalk is grafted onto the root base. This is what produces good fruit. Because of this, if the pit you are using comes from a grafted parent, it may not produce good fruit.

Here is a link that might be useful: Envi Sci and Fishy Plants


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RE: fruit trees from pits

I don't want to sound rude or mean or anything, but I feel as if I should correct a bit of mis-information. FshyPlnts, your right about the grafting in the fruit trees, alot of them are produced that way, but, the DNA in the fruit pit, came from the part of the plant that produced it. Meaning that, the grafted upper produced the flower that produced the fruit, thus its DNA is in the pit, but you are correct, the fruit might not be as good, because of its open pollinated genetics. Though, on the whole, if the parent was grown in a grove of other top notch plants as I suspect it was to make that fruit commercial viable, the resulting offspring most likely will not be night and day different from the parent


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RE: fruit trees from pits

Hey,
Sorry if what I said was confusing. I wasn't trying to say that the DNA is actually in the root. What I meant is that the DNA that the seeds contains (which will be used to produce a new plant) is the combination between the DNA of the base portion of the fruit tree, and the plant whose pollen happened to fertilize the tree in question. A grafted tree contains two different, full sets of genetic material. One from the top of the tree, and one from the plant used as the base. I am not sure the mechanism that causes it, but the DNA that is found in the seed is of the base. Thank you very much Lewisbioed for clarifying my confusion!


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RE: fruit trees from pits

The rootstock of a grafted tree contributes absolutely zero genetic material to the fruit or seed. Like Lewis said, everything from the point of attachment of the graft up is genetically 100% the same as the tree where the part that was grafted on the rootstock (i.e. the scion) came from. Everything from the point of attachment down is genetically 100% rootstock. Since the fruit and seed form above the graft the rootstock has no genetic influence.

However, that doesn't mean fruit trees will come true to seed. Each generation (i.e. seed) is a new genetic combination. (It would be kind of like trying to save seed from a hybrid watermelon -- you wouldn't get what you started with -- except unlike with watermelons that's how all standard fruit tree varieties have always come about.) I've heard that peaches often produce offspring that are fairly good quality (although not as often still freestone), but I've heard that apples very rarely produce quality fruit from seed. All new apple varieties are produced from seed, but breeders are highly selective with apples. It's just that you'd have to grow a lot of apple trees from seed to get one that's any good, or so I've heard.


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