Return to the Seed Saving Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Black eye Susan seeds

Posted by freshmangardener Zone7 (My Page) on
Thu, Oct 30, 08 at 13:58

I couldnt access other posts about this subject so Ive started anew.

I wanted to know what part of the head is the seed and how to take care of it until planting it.

Ive collected the black ball and removed the leaves - is this ball where the seeds are?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Black eye Susan seeds

Yes. The ball should be dry - in other words, you want to pick mature black centers that no longer have flower petals attached. If you picked a flower with live, colorful petals, the seed may not be mature.
Just break that center ball apart, and you will see the small black seeds. Make sure they are fully dried, and keep them in a plastic bag in your fridge until planting time.


 o
RE: Black eye Susan seeds

  • Posted by remy 6WNY (My Page) on
    Fri, Oct 31, 08 at 9:21

Hi,
In addition to what Ekgrows said, when you go looking for the seed, there are two things in the black ball part of the dead flower, dried up flower filaments and the seeds. Both are dark and thin so I think that is why people get easily confused between the two. The filaments are easily crumbled. The seeds are hard little pencil lead pieces looking things.
Also, if you don't want to store them in your fridge, you can store them in an envelope in a cool dark dry spot in your home.
Remy


 o
RE: Black eye Susan seeds

There are a couple of pictures here that might help you:

Black-eye Susan seed heads, chaff, and seeds
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/53/

Black-eyed Susan seed heads, and seeds
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/54/

The seeds are the little uniform dark things and are underneath the chaff, which are the dried up flower filaments that remy mentioned. I've found that I can use the blade of a pair of scissors to scrap the chaff away, using an upwards motion (in shaving terms this would be called going with the grain), then I just dump the seed head upside down in a bowl and knock it against the side a few times to get all of the seeds out. It isn't essential to separate the chaff and seeds, that's just the way I do it.


 o
RE: Black eye Susan seeds

  • Posted by bakemom z6 Central Ohio (My Page) on
    Sat, Nov 1, 08 at 20:11

Once you figure out whtat is seed and chaff, you can harvest both rudbeckia and echinacea with no problem. Each flower had a seed head with spikes and with seed tucked in between the spikes. With rudbeckia, the seed is like little grey splinters in betweem the spikes. It's ok to simply harvest chaff and seed together.


 o
RE: Black eye Susan seeds

Thanks everyone this is a great help.


 o
RE: Black eye Susan seeds

Thanks for answering a question I hadn't even asked, but always wondered about. I've saved many different kinds of seeds from everywhere (I'm an incurable seed snatcher), but never black-eyed susan seeds--just because I could never figure out which part of the seed head was the seed! Thanks for the clarification.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Seed Saving Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here