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narrow evergreen suggestions?

Posted by barbara43206 z5 OH (My Page) on
Sat, May 20, 06 at 14:35

I'm looking for suggestions for a nice looking evergreen to plant as an accent in my front yard. The space is pretty small, so I'd prefer something with a mature width of no more than around 4 feet. The space is on the south side of the house, so it gets lots of sun.

I really like the skyrocket juniper. Is there anything similar, but maybe twice as wide? A neighbor down the street has a ( I always have trouble remember the name) wichita something, but it looks like it's going to grow into a fairly wide within the next few years.

I'm open to green or blue color. I'd just like to plant something a little less common than the usual emerald green arborvitae. Suggestions please!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

Some of the chamaecyprus are really neat. You can find a little bit of anything within this plant family. If you google 'dwarf evergreens' you should be able to locate vendors. Monrovia has a wide variety of chamaecyprus on their website (link below).

Good luck!

Here is a link that might be useful: Monrovia Plants


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

  • Posted by jimshy z7 Brooklyn, NY (My Page) on
    Mon, May 22, 06 at 11:38

For zone 5, you could look into some narrow cultivars of boxwood, ilex glabra (ilex crenata has a few narrow types, but it's only z6 hardy) or ilex opaca, which can be clipped into upright shapes -- you could even go for an evergreen azalea, a pieris japonica, which is a great 4-season shrub, or go with one of the fine chamaecyparis cultivars, like philosopher said.

Jim


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

Wow, lots of great suggestions!

Our summers bring some pretty intense hot sunshine on the south side of the house, so I'm leaning toward one of the heat-loving junipers. Now let's see if I can find some good pictures on the web...


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

"I'm looking for suggestions for a nice looking evergreen to plant as an accent in my front yard. The space is pretty small, so I'd prefer something with a mature width of no more than around 4 feet. The space is on the south side of the house, so it gets lots of sun. "

You may wish to consider a small juniper offered by Wayside Gardens. I live in Zone 5 and would love to plant Italian Cypress, but they are not hearty here in NY. This is the closest to the narrow habit I'm searching for, that I've managed to find. I think it's quite lovely, so neat and compact, but it only grows to 3feet in height. It may be perfect for you.
Buona Fortuna a te,
Sicilianna

Here is a link that might be useful: Wayside Gardens Juniper


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

I don't think anyone has suggested 'Green Arrow' Yellow Cedar yet, it is a wonderful narrow tree. I actually grows narrow enough for you to plant three in the space you might plant one of the other more common narrow conifers, which is good because it looks much better in a group. I planted three of them in a triangle 1 meter apart form each other.

Chamaecyparis nootkatensis 'Green Arrow'

Good Luck,
C.

Here is a link that might be useful: Chamaecyparis nootkatensis 'Green Arrow'


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

Those narrow arborvitea?


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

We have a fastigiate Bosnian pine that is supposed to get around 4-5' wide and 10-12' tall. Search for it under Pinus leucodermis 'Iseli Fastigiate'. It's narrow and fluffy, and it fills the space near the corner of our foundation nicely.

We also have a fernspray false cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Filicoides'). We have it surrounded by japanese blood grass (Imperata cylindrica 'Red Baron'), and the combination is striking. When it reaches full size (8-10' high, 4' wide), it'll be a real focal point in our yard.

Here is a link that might be useful: fernspray false cypress


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

Which, I have a question about my blue columnar junipers. One went splayed this summer, I have no idea why. Since its time to tie them up against the coming snow (sigh), does anyone know if the splaying is permanent, or will tying it for a year or two correct it?


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

  • Posted by cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 18, 07 at 19:59

There are varieties of upright euonymus that make great accent shrubs. Euonymus japonicus 'Silver Knight' is one. They are reputed to reach 6' tall and 3' wide. I planted two of the same species but another variety, and they are dense and have dark shiny green leaves. So far they are 3' tall and 2' wide, but the tag says they too can reach 6' tall and 3' wide.


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

  • Posted by cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 18, 07 at 20:00

There are varieties of upright euonymus that make great accent shrubs. Euonymus japonicus 'Silver Knight' is one. They are reputed to reach 6' tall and 3' wide. I planted two of the same species but another variety, and they are dense and have dark shiny green leaves. So far they are 3' tall and 2' wide, but the tag says they too can reach 6' tall and 3' wide.


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?


Juniperus scopulorum == 2FT. WIDE, 15 FEET TALL
( Skyrocket Juniper )

Extremely narrow, columnar evergreen shrub with bluish-green foliage. Mostly acicular needles. Grows 15 feet tall and only 2 feet wide at base. Requires little pruning to maintain its form. Attractive accent, hedge or windbreak. Grows well in dry locations. Excellent cold tolerance. Does well in the Midwest. Roots readily from cuttings.

How to Grow this Plant:

Characteristics
Cultivar: Skyrocket
Family: Cupressaceae
Size: Height: 10 ft. to 20 ft.
Width: 1.67 ft. to 2 ft.
Plant Category: shrubs,
Plant Characteristics: columnar, low maintenance,
Foliage Characteristics: evergreen,
Foliage Color: blue-green to gold,
Flower Characteristics:
Flower Color:
Tolerances: deer, drought, pollution, rabbits, seashore, slope, wind,

Requirements
Bloomtime Range: not applicable
USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 7
AHS Heat Zone: Not defined for this plant
Light Range: Dappled to Full Sun
pH Range: 4.5 to 8.5
Soil Range: Some Sand to Some Clay
Water Range: Semi-Arid to Moist

Plant Care

Fertilizing
How-tos : Fertilization for Established Plants

Established plants can benefit from fertilization. Take a visual inventory of your landscape. Trees need to be fertilized every few years. Shrubs and other plants in the landscape can be fertilized yearly. A soil test can determine existing nutrient levels in the soil. If one or more nutrients is low, a specific instead of an all-purpose fertilizer may be required. Fertilizers that are high in N, nitrogen, will promote green leafy growth. Excess nitrogen in the soil can cause excessive vegetative growth on plants at the expense of flower bud development. It is best to avoid fertilizing late in the growing season. Applications made at that time can force lush, vegetative growth that will not have a chance to harden off before the onset of cold weather.

Light
Conditions : Full Sun

Full Sun is defined as exposure to more than 6 hours of continuous, direct sun per day.

Watering
Conditions : Normal Watering for Outdoor Plants

Normal watering means that soil should be kept evenly moist and watered regularly, as conditions require. Most plants like 1 inch of water a week during the growing season, but take care not to over water. The first two years after a plant is installed, regular watering is important for establishment. The first year is critical. It is better to water once a week and water deeply, than to water frequently for a few minutes.

Planting
How-tos : Planting Shrubs

Dig a hole twice the size of the root ball and deep enough to plant at the same level the shrub was in the container. If soil is poor, dig hole even wider and fill with a mixture half original soil and half compost or soil amendment.
Carefully remove shrub from container and gently separate roots. Position in center of hole, best side facing forward. Fill in with original soil or an amended mixture if needed as described above. For larger shrubs, build a water well. Finish by mulching and watering well.

If the plant is balled-and-burlapped, remove fasteners and fold back the top of natural burlap, tucking it down into hole, after you've positioned shrub. Make sure that all burlap is buried so that it won't wick water away from rootball during hot, dry periods. If synthetic burlap, remove if possible. If not possible, cut away or make slits to allow for roots to develop into the new soil. For larger shrubs, build a water well. Finish by mulching and watering well.

If shrub is bare-root, look for a discoloration somewhere near the base; this mark is likely where the soil line was. If soil is too sandy or too clayey, add organic matter. This will help with both drainage and water holding capacity. Fill soil, firming just enough to support shrub. Finish by mulching and watering well.


Problems
Pest : Caterpillars

Caterpillars are the immature form of moths and butterflies. They are voracious feeders attacking a wide variety of plants. They can be highly destructive and are characterized as leaf feeders, stem borers, leaf rollers, cutworms and tent-formers.
Prevention and Control: keep weeds down, scout individual plants and remove caterpillars, apply labeled insecticides such as soaps and oils, take advantage of natural enemies such as parasitic wasps in the garden and use Bacillus thuringiensis (biological warfare) for some caterpillar species.

Pest : Leaf Miners

Leaf Miner is actually a term that applies to various larvae (of moths, beetles, and flies) that tunnel between upper and lower leaf surfaces, leaving a distinctive, squiggly pattern. A female adult can lay several hundred eggs inside the leaf which hatch and give rise to miners. Leaf miners attack ornamentals and vegetables.

Prevention and Control: Keep weeds down and scout individual plants for tell-tale squiggles. Pick and destroy these leaves and take advantage of natural enemies such as parasitic wasps. Know the Growing Degree Days (GDD)* for your area to target insecticide sprays when most beneficial for controlling the specific leafminer.


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RE: narrow evergreen close to house

I realize this thread is old. I am desperate for advice. I bought a nice blue arrow juniper on the suggestion of the garden center. I planted it about two feet from my house on the south facing side. They assured me this would be okay. I am worried about the roots harming the foundation. Do you think I should move it?


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RE: narrow evergreen suggestions?

Linda 6, you'll be OK unless your foundation is incredibly weak. This is not a massive plant and the root system will not be very invasive. I am in the business of designing and planting in eastern MA and almost never design or advise planting 2' from a house but Blue Arrow Juniper is ideal for tight, close to anything locations.

Good luck.
Dan/Charles River Landesign


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