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Bamboo

Posted by hawkeye38 7bAL (My Page) on
Mon, Apr 19, 04 at 13:33

Any suggestions on how to kill Bamboo?
It is creeping underground into my garden.
I can't stop it.
What kills it?
Hawkeye


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Bamboo

Try planting Kudzu in a controlled area. Dont let it Escape! you can also try planting either loblolly, slash, or longleaf pine groves it may take a while


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RE: Bamboo

How does planting kudzu or pine kill bamboo?


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RE: Bamboo

Cut each cane off about 5" from the ground and brush (using a disposable paint brush) the top with undiluted roundup. You may have to repeat the procedure. It is not easy to eradicate spreading bamboo.


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RE: Bamboo

To Pterostyrax:
That is pretty high, did you mean 5 inches?
Many emerging stalks are not even a foot high.
I thought Round-up may be an answer.
Hawkeye


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RE: Bamboo

The " symbol stands for inches. Undiluted Roundup might work but so would brush killer. I know people who dig a deep trench around their bamboo and when it tries to dross they cut it off.


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RE: Bamboo

I had a Golden Retreiver once who loved bamboo shoots. Never had a problem once he learned how yummy they were.


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RE: Bamboo

I (stupidly) planted dwarf bamboo in one small section of my yard about 20 years ago and, although I surrounded it with a vinyl edging that was about 8 inches deep, it has begun to spring up everywhere around the outside of the area. It has travelled under a cement sidewalk into my azalea bushes and even under the width of the driveway and spread to the other side of my lawn. Whenever I give it a "haircut," I make sure to get up every last piece of leaf that is trimmed to hasten the spreading, but obviously that hasn't helped that much. Mine is growing about 4 feet tall in the middle of azalea shrubs -- how do you kill that without killing the shrub?


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RE: Bamboo

I wish I had an answer. Someone planted bamboo at our home years ago. It had since pretty much taken over. We have a hot tub in the corner of the yard, surrounded by bamboo. Believe it or not the bamboo has taken to trying to grow out from under the brick patio in front of the hottub destroying all my husband's hard work. It also grew up somehow through the hot tub motor and we managed to cut that shoot off before it destroyed the hot tub. The stuff is really just incredible.


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RE: Bamboo

The only way to get ride of bamboo is NOT TO PLANT IT.
I have burned it. I have dug it up. I have cut it and filled the remaining tube with Concentrated Round-up and any other chemical I could obtain. Seems all I have done is get it mad. Any one know of any agent orange drums lying around in a land fill or toxic waste dump? Will try any thing once.


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RE: Bamboo

SALT!


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RE: Bamboo

Rasputen,
Is that true, or are you kidding? Have you really been successful using salt to kill bamboo? If so, how did you do it? Please? We have bamboo creeping into our yard from the neighbor's grove, and I really don't want to use any dangerous chemicals.
K.


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RE: Bamboo

I have a love/hate feeling about bamboo.It seems to me graceful and beautiful, but there's no denying its aggressiveness. I've allowed it to spread into part of my garden but then realized I needed a barrier. Spent too much money, but here's what I did: rented a Ditch Witch, dug a 100' trench about 30" deep, and laid some thick plastic 32" deep that I got online from a company in Wash. or Oregon. This has kept all bamboo out for 6-8 years. Leave 1" of plastic aboveground so you can see where the bamboo curls over the barrier; easy then to sever it. I forget exactly the thickness of the plastic, but it's slightly thinner than an aphalt shingle.
Hawkeye, do you just hate it, or do you simply lack the space? Might some bamboo form a nice background for your shrubs? I find it beautiful year round.


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RE: Bamboo

This bamboo is way outta hand. My Dad planted it many years ago to grow FISHING POLES! It now has fully overtaken about 1/2 acre and runners and sprouts extend at least 100 feet, Last fall a shoot came up in the middle of the shop and quickly grew up with no sunshine. I am now trying full strength Roundup. I want to try salt but don't know how it is to be applied. Any suggestion Rasputen? I probably will try the ditch and barrier.


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RE: Bamboo

Salt may not be a "dangerous chemical" but it will persist in the soil and you won't be able to grow anything else there after the bamboo. Really not the best choice of a weed suppressant, although I can understand desperation when dealing with the heinous curse that is bamboo. The people who plant this stuff other than in very stout containers should be impaled on its emerging stalks.


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RE: Bamboo

One of my good friends purchased a house with a large stand of bamboo all along one side. I told him to give up on getting rid of the bamboo quickly, but he has really (and amazingly) gotten rid of most of it. How did he do it? Hours and hours or REALLY hard labor and a lot of roundup. And I mean gruelling physical work! He still has to keep a close watch because it will spring up out of nowhere even though it appears to be gone. It's a real chore, but it CAN be done. Good luck! - Ais.


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RE: Bamboo

Round up and brush killer are most effective in the fall when sap is transmuting from the leaves to the roots. Has anyone tryed soaking a sheet in roundup, covering the bamboo and staking a piece of plastic over that(to try to keep the roundup moist)


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RE: Bamboo

Kudzu was mentioned earlier. If there's anything more invasive than bamboo, it's kudzu. Please don't plant it.


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RE: Bamboo

My brother eventually got rid of about a 1/4 acre of bamboo growing on his farm by repeatedly bushhogging the area. the bamboo kind of wears itself out recovering each time. but it took several years of doing this to wipe out the whole patch.


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RE: Bamboo

help! i have been digging and digging for weeks, and I can't kill ALL the bamboo, is there a specific poison that I can use that will blanket the ground? I need real help. this stuff is going into the neighbors yard and their drive way. they're getting very upset. one neighbor has a 4000 dollar driveway... he is going to want me to pay to fix it!

Here is a link that might be useful: my computer repair shop in asheville


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RE: Bamboo

You can get generic roundup (glycophosphate) concentrate in HD Landscape. It is the same chemical. I bought a 3 gallong container for $35 last year. It doesn't work as fast as the consumer roundup, but it's a lot cheaper. We just cut down some evasive eldeberry and I poured undiluted glyco into all of the cut stalks.


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RE: Bamboo

I bought a house with tons of bamboo and have paid a student to cut it down. I'm now just relentlessly cutting new shoots and using Roundup--a biologist friend says that if it's not allowed to photosynthesize it will eventually die. But I'm posting because the property was also covered with kudzu--which climbs over the bamboo to launch itself into trees and because of the bamboo, you can't reach the kudzu roots. So no matter how bad each is individually, both together are a nightmare.

Incidentally, I also have invasive English ivy, poison ivy and wisteria. Luckily, I have a sense of humor as well.


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RE: Bamboo

I think I figured out the kudzu answer. He may have meant that kudzu is so horribly invasive that it would cover the bamboo and smother it out! That might actually work, but then you'd have the worse problem of the kudzu!


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RE: Bamboo

This is more of a question than a response to Hawkeye's question, but I have also been 'bamboomed' by bamboo that had a few sprigs and very little growth for the past five years. This spring about a hundred new shoots came up a few inches. I figured I'd take care of it when I returned. Now a week later these have shot up to 6 to 8 feet and growing several inches per day. My question is: Which is the best killer? I've heard about Cross Bow, Brush Kill, RoundUp, Kills All, and now salt. Any comments?


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RE: Bamboo

It is comforting to see that there are others with the same opinion of bamboo that I have! I have been fighting my neighbours bamboo for fifteen years...the only way that I have found is to ruthlessly cut it down when it matures and run down the shoots with the lawnmower. You can beat it back, but it never really goes away.

I hear that the bamboo in china dies every 70 years...only fifty five years left to wait!


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RE: Bamboo

Mine is from the neighbors'. 1-2 inch diameter, 15-40 ft high. Bushes when big stuff has been cut down.

I got them to agree to let me trench around it when I had to replace our water main (large chain trencher) a few years ago. I put in 24" wide stainless-steel flashing (50-foot rolls). That stopped its spread and allowed me to attack my side of the problem.

Right around tax day, the new, soft shoots start up--the big stuff can grow about 3+ feet a week. I stomp (big boots) and/or cut those off (hand-held digging axe) every couple of days for about 2 weeks until gone. This left only the old stuff, which after a few years started to die off normally, but it still "lives".

I have tested techniques on sections of it. Here are some of the techniques that have worked to varying degrees for me. You have to get it ALL or it just comes back.

Brute Force: Pickaxe spade and dig it up. Works every time.

Mowing: I use my old mower with a Gator(tm) blade at a low height. Just keep it mowed low enough and it eventually wears out and dies. This with herbicides on the leafy stuff works if you're persistent (never let it get ahead of you).

Mechanical Force: Stump grinder down about 6 inches throughout.(Rather messy.) Mine is a fairly shallow growth, but not sure I got it all. Those stump grinders throw stuff everywhere!

Herbicides: Cutting off at the base (low as possible) with branch pruning shears or chainsaw. Immediately fill stump hole with herbicide and coat the outside of the stump:
1) Straight RoundUp when actively growing
2) Arsenal AC (growth stimulator) mixed with RoundUp if not actively growing.
or
3) Brush-B-Gone any time.
4) I also used one of those Total Vegetation Killers (Triox?) that seemed to do some serious damage to even the full grown stuff. You have to clean the ground to bare soil (no leaves or such) to apply to the bare ground.
Don't like using these as a general practice. Doesn't seem to be a guaranteed kill. Might be too many other roots off the main rhizomes or its too deep.

I re-connected with a friend of mine who may come over with a backhoe. My hero. Always the best way--let someone else do it for you!

If you can, flooding with water (submerge the ground) for at least 1 week (2 preferred) will also kill it. The water needs to soak well into the ground. This will be my last resort. We have a creek nearby. I will sandbag around it and pump from the creek.

I will endeavor to persevere...Man versus nature.


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RE: Bamboo

  • Posted by emacie southeastern (My Page) on
    Fri, Jun 1, 07 at 18:18

I naively gave my neighbor permission to plant bamboo along our fence 15 years ago. I had no idea it would run so wild. Now it's to the point that it would be impossible to dig trenches as it's even gone down into ditches and up to a terraced area. Makes me wonder what's to keep it from going under a barrier? I dont have the funds or the ability to dig a trench to even put in a barrier. I'm using a water pressure sprayer to expose the roots, and plan to cut them with a chain saw, spray Bayer vine and stump killer then mark them with spray marker paint when dry and cover them again with soil. I hope to be able to check if any new growth occurs. I have been using concentrated super Round Up on the new shouts this year rather than cut them off so it will hopefully kill the root then marking them with spray paint to keep track of what Ive sprayed. I know it kills the new shoots, but not sure if it really kills the root system. Salt hasnt worked at all for me.


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RE: Bamboo

My neighbor planted bamboo in her yard.It crept under the fence,into my yard.It became a pretty good stand,growing about eight foot tall and traveling to my lawn area.I finally cut it down,and then dug down into the soil(and it wasn't easy)and chopped and pulled the roots out.It was a lot of hard work,but I finally got rid of it.


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RE: Bamboo

What did I do about my bamboo situation---MOVE! I had planted different varieties of running bamboo about 15 years ago--it was too late when I realized what I had done. Yes, they are beautiful, they look beautiful in full summer and in the heavy snow (I live in North Jersey). But when culms started reaching 30 plus feet with ever expanding width, it was beyond any control. I had a Southern Magnolia in the back which is on the frontier of the grove and believe it will eventually be overwhelmed and chocked by the bamboo. Running bamboos should definitely be sold with a warning label. PS. I have since converted to clumping bamboos on my new property.


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RE: Bamboo

We have been dealing with a smaller version of bamboo (equisetum hyemale) for 2 years now here in mid-MO. Commonly called scouring rush horsetail or just rush. It creeps into crop fields from ditches and banks and was just taking the fields over. It can't be plowed up- every little root piece will sprout a new plant. We found a ditch full of very dead rush, managed to track down the owner and got the "recipe": 6 oz per gallon of each of the following- Roundup, Crossbow, Rangestar and surfactant. This is very toxic so you can't use it around pets, you have to have complete coverage on the plants, and you'd have to wear protection. Very expensive as well, but you do what you have to do. I feel for you all that have this monstrous stuff in your yards.


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RE: Bamboo

To jmwe29:
Any additional details on this killing solution or web articles? Is it sprayed or poured? On Individual plants or entire area? On mature or immature plants? What type surfactant? Soap? Any indication of damage to wildlife animals? Anything other info?
Thanks


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RE: Bamboo

We use 15 or 25 gallon spot sprayers on the back of a Kawasaki Mule. On a smaller scale, a pump sprayer will work fine. You have to spray when the plants are in full, active growth when it's plenty warm, but not stressed by drought. The chemicals are systemic- they have to be absorbed thru the "leaves"; the leaves are teensy, which is why this stuff is so hard to control. Mature or young plants, hit them all. The stuff doesn't work from the ground; you have to get it on the plants. As far as surfactant, we've just been using what they use in the field from the elevator- farm stuff. I have no clue what you'd use in a home situation. It's cheap; you might
check farm supply places for info on small quantities. Yeah, maybe dish detergent would work, though it foams. I don't know. Laundry detergent might be a better bet. Make sure it's all mixed well before spraying. And be prepared to spend a bunch on these chemicals and to have to treat more than once. We've got large areas of dead rush now, but new shoots around the perimiters, so we'll be hitting it again.

I went the length trying to find answers online and from chemical companies directly and came up empty. It was just chance that we happened to see that guy's dead rush that day, and that he happened to be home at the time.
Extension service didn't have a clue either. As far as wildlife concerns, you'd just about have to download chemical labels (usually pdf files) to see for yourself. One major concern was getting this stuff into water. If
you've got a creek close where it might run off, that may not be a good idea.

It's pretty much a matter of ganging up on the stuff with herbicides in strong concentrations and several kinds at once. Many won't want to use poisons this strong and I can understand that, but when you're desperate, you're desperate. Farmers have tried to dig it up with equipment and succeeded in only spreading it. Roots are too deep.
(Bill- sorry about the repetition; I decided to post directly to the website as well.)


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RE: Bamboo

Oh God you poor fellow sufferer.

I have bamboo at the side of my yard. It is a constant struggle to keep it within bounds.

I once found it growing up inside my hot tub. It had also ran under the cement patio and started burrowing up underneath it.

I fully expect one day to find a shoot among the living room floor carpet.

It is extremely invasive. My husband digs trenches, and tries to keep them out that way. But you always have to be on your guard.


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RE: Bamboo

We found strictly by accident that turpentine kills bamboo. It is made from Larch pitch and is environmentally friendly. It shrivelled up the bamboo over night. It's only drawback is it is really stinky!!


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RE: Bamboo

I too was naive enough to let my neighbor plant bamboo in 1982! As you can guess, it has a real strangle hold on my yard and woods. I've just started attacking it in earnest, and am thankful for any and all suggestions. I've started cutting it down, leaving about a foot. How do you get rid of the poles? If I chip them up, should I worry about them growing, or should I burn them? Also, how do you use the turpentine method? Thanks!!!


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RE: Bamboo

Turpentine is an organic solvent. Its vapor can irritate the skin and eyes, damage the lungs and respiratory system, as well as the central nervous system when inhaled, and cause renal failure when ingested, among other things. It also poses a fire hazard since it is flammable.


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RE: Bamboo-consider it DEAD!!

I had (key word) running bamboo spreading over my raised drain field about two weeks ago when I cruised to this site for some ideas on how to stop it. (I HAD to stop it or look forward to replacing a drain field in the next year or two! $5000 in this town)
after reading the "cut the stalk near ground level and get 47% Greenout on it before the sap recedes (15 seconds), I decided to go a step further:
I tried to kill weeds in our yard last year with Spectracide for Southern Yards in the hose mounted bottle, and nearly killed the whole yard in my impatience, so I KNEW it could be a real "bad boy" if given the opportunity.
I had some medical syringes left over from a vitamin D regimen.
Combining the two, I injected the stalks about 4-6" above ground level with 1.5 mm of undiluted Spectracide and incanted the mystical gardener's spell: "DIE, DAMN YOU!"
(don't forget this, it's the MOST important part!)
Two days later, all offenders were in compliance, and the chemical contained in the area of offense.


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RE: Bamboo

You guys are going to kill me... perhaps I should keep mum... I eat my bamboo shoots and enjoy them. Whatever escapes and grows to full size is later used by my teenager to make medieval battle weapons - he runs an MBA at school and needs them all the time. My bamboo is, um, heavily used and not really spreading. (I am covering my head).


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Bamboo

During hurricane Ivan my beautiful yard got on the Crazy Train. My kiwi won't produce fruit (posted query in kiwi forum) and the bamboo from hell appeared. We cut and cut but no joy. I hesitant to use strong chemicals because we have pets and recently began flooding. I thought about somehow containing it with flashing but it's gone to far. The thing is I have vintage camellias and azaleas. I know they are there because I see the blooms peeking through. Right now we are refugees from the flood of April 29th so no pets. What can I do, immediately, eradicate or at least contain the aggressive growth. Flashing for containment but how deep? What Chem and how applied?


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Bamboo

During hurricane Ivan my beautiful yard got on the Crazy Train. My kiwi won't produce fruit (posted query in kiwi forum) and the bamboo from hell appeared. We cut and cut but no joy. I hesitant to use strong chemicals because we have pets and recently began flooding. I thought about somehow containing it with flashing but it's gone to far. The thing is I have vintage camellias and azaleas. I know they are there because I see the blooms peeking through. Right now we are refugees from the flood of April 29th so no pets. What can I do, immediately, eradicate or at least contain the aggressive growth. Flashing for containment but how deep? What Chem and how applied?


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