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Identify crepe mrytle

Posted by tcason2 8 (My Page) on
Sat, Aug 3, 13 at 14:11

Im pretty sure this is a Catawba crepe, it has sort of glossy leaves. But it does have a certain pink look to it, more so than purple. Any ideas?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Identify crepe mrytle

another


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RE: Identify crepe mrytle

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RE: Identify crepe mrytle

Are you suggesting that all three trees are the same cultivar? Or are you asking the name of each?


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RE: Identify crepe mrytle

maybe Osage


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RE: Identify crepe mrytle

they are all from the same place and have the same features. So my guess would be that they are all the same cultivar


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RE: Identify crepe mrytle

This is a common Crepe. I see them everywhere. Can't say but I have one growing in my front yard. I wanted a light lavender and got this instead. So the name I was given at ordering time was incorrect. Why don't you take your pics to a nursery that can possibly identify it and sells them or can order one for you. And if you get a light lavender instead, I'll trade you. LOL....

Guessing that's why you want to know.

Sorry, it's the best I can offer.


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RE: Identify crepe mrytle

Given the vigor of the plant, and the fact that the color isn't photographing well, I'm going to guess it's Muskogee.

Muskogee's color is described as a 'lavender pink', or 'lavender'. To me, it's a dusty Orchid. Looks pink in sunshine, but in more pleasant lighting (dusk, stormy weather....) the color is more lavender. I had an art teacher who called colors like that "fleeting". Fleeting colors are actually very valuable in the landscape, because they tend to blend with other colors extremely well.

In my opinion, Muskogee is the very best of all the Crape Myrtles. It stays in bloom longer than almost any other Myrtle, too. I think it has the prettiest 'architecture' of any variety (assuming it hasn't been 'murdered', as were the poor specimens in your photos), and the most sensuous trunks.

Be aware that Muskogee is one of the larger varieties. If you don't want a big tree, then there are other Crapes in other shapes and sizes (including weeping dwarfs, which give the effect of Bouganvillea !!!!). Here's the index to which I refer, when choosing: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/databases/crapemyrtle/crape_myrtle_varieties.html Everything you need to know (including fall foliage and mildew resistance). In case the link can't be made to work, I entered ' Texas A&M Crape Myrtle ' and the search engine took me right to it.


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