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Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

Posted by flowernanny z7MS (My Page) on
Fri, Aug 13, 04 at 20:50

Has anyone in northeast MS had oleanders survive over winter and come back out in the spring? It is in a container now. I was thinking about sinking the pot in the ground on the south side of the house. Thanks for any suggestions.

Dorris


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

Nope, they won't make it unless you overwinter them in a sunroom or something similar, and then they get spider mites something awful. I think they're a zone 9b+ plant.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

It would probably survive most winters in Zone 7, with heavy mulch and sheltered fron the wind. I have friend that has grown them here in Zone 7 for many years and they bloom each year. If you have a severe winter, with temps below 10*F for several nights in a row, I'm sure it couldn't survive, but that is extremely rare here.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

First, you have to pick a cultivar that is hardy - different cultivars have different hardiness. None of them will be above the ground hardy over time in your zone, but the most hardy ones will come back from the roots every year. They bloom on new wood, so this is not a big liability.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

Thanks for your responses. I think I'll try putting it in the ground close to the house on the south side and mulching it heavily. I live near Tupelo and occassionally we will have lows in the upper teens. Hopefully it will come back out.

Dorris


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

I see lots of established oleanders here in my area, just north of Jackson. It's technically zone 8 but on the border of zone 7.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

I've got one that's I've had in the ground here in Clemson for a couple of years. I have no idea what variety it is since my Dad in Charleston gave it to me. He just stuck a broken branch into a tin can and it rooted. (He can do things like that.) He brought it up here and I planted it. It's against a wooden fence and gets afternoon sun.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

IF you are going to try your best bet it with the red oleander, I have seen those grow well in Atlanta and Macon. They flower every year and have little winter damage.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

Where can I find a list of hardy oleanders? Thank you


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

I have two here in NC zone 7. We had a couple of bad (for this area) snow and ice storms last year. They both turned brown after the 2nd storm. I thought they were dead, I cut them down to a few inches but left them in the ground. They are both about 3 feet tall now, but only one of them has bloomed. I'm going to mulch them heavier this year and if we have any snow or ice storms I think I am going to try and cover them with something.

Ginger


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

Be aware that oleanders may clog your sewer lines if they are older clay type pipes. If your home was built with in the last 25 years you probably have PVC lines. My father-in-law was a plumber and he said oleanders made him a lot of money over the years. Keep that in mind when you decide where to plant them.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

FlowerNanney -

I know this thread is long dead, but I'm from the Tupelo area and have just aquired a red oleander. I'm wondering how yours fared this past couple of years?


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

Most of the ones I see in NC are right on the coast. I don't see any in my area...or at least they don't make it to see another spring.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

I live in Oxford, MS. I have had two oleanders for 5 years that I keep in large pots around my pool. The first two years they wintered indoors at my office. Last year I kept them in the garage. This year they stayed out by the pool all winter. I cut them way back in early spring and they are budding out as pretty as you please. They always have beautiful blooms and the jury is still out on that for this year, but I will let you know.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

Oh that is good to hear - the blooming on new wood bit. One of mine died - but the other one is putting out new growth! I have been thinkging of planting some closer to the house - but i think i will hold off on that, since it is an OLD house. :)


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Post freeze oleander cleanup

We got some cold days here in south Louisiana and our oleander is looking pretty scrappy. I am pretty sure it is not dead, the leaves just took some abuse. Is there anything we should to to cleanup the frost-bitten areas or will they take care of themselves? I attached a picture.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

feenix, wait for a few more weeks, then prune your plant all the way to the ground. You'll be pleasantly surprised at how quickly it regrows. That looks like an awfully crowded spot for it, however.
Why is that green tie around the stem?


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

You are right, it is an awfully tight spot. I am not sure why it was planted there except maybe they thought it would be "bushy" on top and stay bushy under the roof edge. It is not my favorite location. I do not know how long it has been there but I know it has been at least 5 years since I moved in and it was there then. The roots of the shrubbery in general are just knots so i doubt it would transplant well if I was able to "cut" it out of that location.

That green tie is a rubbery plastic tie that keeps the top heavy shrub from almost laying down on top of the hollies below.


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RE: Do oleanders survive winter in zone 7-NE MS?

This winter is the first time that I have ever had any trouble in 20 yrs. of growing them. They were 1 and 2 yr old. The larger ones survived. The younger ones were more exposed, whereas, the older ones were somewhat shielded by pines. In my opinion they are worth the try.


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