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Bamboo thread five

Posted by luvtosharedivs 5a WI (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 1, 10 at 19:08

Rufas are shooting!!!!!!

OMG, I was soooooooo surprised! We've been having a stretch of above normal temps lately, summerlike in fact, so I pulled away the mulch near the crown of the rufa behind the garage, and found a whole bunch of new baby shoots emerging.

I got so excited, that I went over to the rufa next to the house, where it's been getting slammed by some strong winds (wind tunnel between the house and garage.) That one's shooting too!!!! The shoots are 3-4" high, and they are so cute!

Right now it's too windy to take a pic, but I have all next week off work, and will snap some pics then, and post them here.

I DID IT! I finally succeeded to bring my bamboos through the winter and see them spring to life:)))

I guess they like it here!

Wait a minute. I just thought of something. We're not out of danger of frost yet. I doubt if we'll get any hard frosts, but certainly can get light frosts. Our last average frost date is May 10.

Kt, what do you think freezing temps will do to those newly emerging baby shoots?

Now I'm scared.

Julie


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Bamboo thread five

Great! That is good to hear, and they sound like they are healthy?

New shoots here are cold hardy only to 'frost' temps, which is around 34F, maybe a bit higher.

If frost threatens here, people will cover the new shoots the night before, with a tarp or bedsheet, but the frost only lasts through the night and then warms up with daylight.

In your area, the cold might be more drastic.

New shoots cannot tolerate very much cold...just like new leaves(buds) on a tree. Just to be safe, I'd cover at least some of them if cold threatens, that way you could see if the uncovered ones survive without protection...just a thought.

You area is so different than mine here, I'm not sure if any of my advice is worthy or not.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Oh yes, your advice is certainly worthy.
Come to think of it, I know people who cover different plants around here, but mainly in the fall, when they want tender plants to last longer into the late season.

I'll keep a sheet handy, in case there's danger of frost.

Yes, the new baby shoots are healthy.
The coloring is a very bright green, and the taller ones have tiny baby leaves on the tips.

I'll post pics (hopefully) in a few days.

J


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I have a few bamboo starting to shoot here also.

My Moso is alsways the first 'inground' bamboo to shoot, and it has some shoots almost as tall as I am now.

I don't recall my new shoots on my Fargesias being bright green but they were definitely lighter coloured.

I bet they look great, and can't(cain't) wait to see the pics!

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Keep that electric blanket handy Julie because your going to need it.


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Bernie, I don't think I'd go THAT far, (with an electric blanket) - Ha!

I just looked up the 10-day forecast for our area, and the lowest nighttime temp is 37. I know that frost can form even if the air temp (where the thermometer is located,) is above freezing, because at ground level the temps can be much cooler.

There are many variables involved that can affect frost possibility, and I'll just have to watch for them, or simply listen to the evening weather reports. Clear, calm windless nights are positive indications that frost can occur, if the temps are low enough. Cloud cover with wind prevents frost from forming this time of year.

I think the overhang of the garage roof is enough to protect the rufa behind the garage. It's the rufa planted next to the base of the house I'm more concerned about.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

FINALLY I have some pics of Rufa.

All week it has been either raining, snowing, or just plain too windy. I got some pics a few days ago, and then again today, when the wind died down a bit.

I just wish I had three hands. One to hold plant foliage back to see the crown area, and two to hold the camera.

Oh well, I have these few to show the latest progress.

In this first shot, you can see some dried, damages culms that were "wind burned" from the wind tunned between the house and the garage. The green part had been still covered by snow most of the winter, so fared better:
damaged culms

Next we have some nice shoots emerging. They vary in size now from a couple of inches to about 10", and new ones emerge daily:
Shoots

Now here's something that impressed me on Rufa behind the garage where it's more sheltered...new side shoots are growing out of last year's culms...how exciting:
Side shoots

More baby shoots from rufa behind garage:
Closeup shoots

And in this last pic, you can see shoots a little taller...This is one tough Fargesia!
And more shoots

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Very nice!!

My Fargesias never shooted that well here. I think it will do well in your area now that it made it through the Winter.

Normally, it will shoot, then spend the rest of the Summer growing more roots/rhizomes, although it will occassionally put up a shoot now and then.

Many of my bamboos have yet to shoot, and I'm not sure if they all made it through the Winter.

I have one Moso shoot that is over 10 feet tall already and still growing.

In your third pic, as with my bamboos here, if the leaves freeze off but the culm stays green and alive, then it will regrow new limbs as you see. I have several that had defoliated from this year's extreme cold but they are now regrowing limbs and leaves.

Rufa should get larger this year than last year and really large next year.

Thanks for posting those!

I am happy that you got it to survive and I'm happy for Rufa!

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I was so sad after I lost F. Panda last year, and now with Rufa performing with vigor, I feel encouraged again, that I can successfully grow bamboo in our harsh climate.

I'm glad you suggested dividing Rufa and planting in a couple of different locations...it was you that suggested that, wasn't it? Or maybe it was me deciding to experiment.

Rufa behind the garage was protected from harsh Winter and early Spring winds, but it wasn't covered other than the few inches of mulch around the crown. I believe if fared better than the other plant.

Rufa next to the house was well protected all Winter, as long as the snow cover was deep, covering the culms. But as soon as the bitter Spring winds lashed out, the culms couldn't handle the fierce drying winds, and I'm sure that's why most of the leaves turned brown.

It will be interesting to see how the two of them compare through their second year in their locations. Maybe one of them will be big enough to divide later this year, and I can try yet another location.

Many of my bamboos have yet to shoot...
Am I to understand that some varieties shoot later in the season?

I have one question about Rufa.
I will watch the culms to see if any look dead, esp. on the plant in the wind tunnel between between the house and garage, and if (after a reasonable length of time,) it looks like no new growth is starting on any of the dead looking culms, is it O.K. to cut them back to the crown, leaving more room for the new culms?

Thanks for your comments!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I'm sure you decided to divide the plant for experimentation, but I do always recommend dividing bamboos and keeping one in a safe place, that way if one does not survive, you still have a plant to work with.

Am I to understand that some varieties shoot later in the season?

Generally speaking, runners will shoot in the early Spring, and clumpers will shoot in the late Summer or Fall. Fargesias are considered 'mountain' bamboos and they are clumpers, but they may shoot early, and then again in the Fall...I'll have to check into that. And of course, any plant that is damaged in the Winter will send up 'emergency' shoots in the Spring in order to help the plant survive. My clumpers shoot starting in late July through November, depending on the variety, but if they get freezer burn, then they will send up some shoots early in order to help the plant recover.

If the culms are brown(normally green on Rufa) then they are most likely dead. Some bamboos have brown or tan coloured culms, so it is hard to tell if they are alive or not.

It is OK to cut the dead ones away at any time. I usually bend the culms, and if they don't snap, then they might still be alive, if they snap, they are dead.

You could cut the culms back at any time, but I like to be sure they are dead because if you cut live culms off, then that is that much more that the plant has to regrow, and it sets the plant back somewhat. (I think I had too many 'that's' in that last sentence...improper).

I have been needing to remove my plants from my greenhouses but haven't gotten around to it. I have to fix my cow pens here today and also need to cut some timber out at the country since the brushgrinder will be there Tuesday or Wedsnesday.

I may be replanting some of my large clumpers if they did not survive the Winter. I should have protected them from the cold but I never have enough time.

I have a question for you, do the new shoots come out of the ground looking pointed or spearlike? Or do they have leaves showing almost immediately?

I'm interested in the look of those new shoots. I'll try to find some pics and info on a shooting Rufa.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Thanks for the tip on bending the culms to see if they snap or not. I made a note of it, and will try it some time this next week. Rufa next to the house (which got the most wind damage) has the most dry-looking culms. It also has less new shoots coming up than the plant behind the garage. Not sure why. Might have something to do with temperature? I consider the South garage bed to be a micro climate, being warmer than any other place on my property. (Could almost call it a zone 6.)

There's always some fixin' to do around your place, isn't there? Just when you want/need to move plants from your greenhouse, something more pressing comes up.

I wish I could spend more time tending to my gardens (cleaning up, weeding, etc.) BUT that darn Garlic Mustard is popping up all over, and I need to get rid of it all before it flowers and sets millions of seeds. I spent most of the day digging, and made a lot of progress, but late this afternoon I found some new patches that will never get dug before they flower. So I will have to resort to spraying with Round-Up tomorrow to get the last of the patches. Don't like to use Round-Up,only as a last resort, because it kills everything and leaves the ground bare. But if I don't spray, there's a danger of the darn stuff of invading the whole East woods! Grrrrrr....

But back to bamboo, I had a chance to read your last post a few hours ago, but didn't get to respond until just now. You asked, ... do the new shoots come out of the ground looking pointed or spearlike? Or do they have leaves showing almost immediately?
After I read that, I went out and looked at the newest/shortest shoots (less than 2" in height,) and saw that they have teensy-weensy leaves, and they are not pointed or spearlike.

So what does that mean, as opposed to bamboos that emerge spearlike?

Do you have any Fargesias?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Could almost call it a zone 6.

Yes, I have places here that I could bump up to a higher zone also...or would that be lower zone. Hmmm,...just like guitar strings, I call the wrong ones higher.

There's always some fixin' to do around your place, isn't there?

After penning my neighbours calves that got into my pasture, two calves went crazy and dented my new water trough that took me four hours to install, and they broke two gates, which I have to fix before the middle of this week since we are needing the pens to be functional for our cattle. I also need to put in some posts and replace some boards, and another neighbour is waiting on me to pen a bull that he wants to buy, etc.

I noticed tonight that my water here is turning yellow/brown, probably rust, so that means I will probably need a new waterwell, etc...somedays, I don't even know why I come home, there is nothing here for me except things that need fixing.

Do you have any Fargesias?

I used to, but lost them in the excessive heat and drought a few years ago.

So what does that mean, as opposed to bamboos that emerge spearlike?

Nothing, just curious. I don't remember mine putting up shoots early in the year, at least not that many.

Sometimes bamboos will put up tiny new shoot-like growths that really aren't culms. They are really limbs that are coming from a node that is just below the surface of the ground or mulchline.

I was just curious if those were actuually culms or possibly limbs, although they look like culms.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Good grief, never a dull moment around your place, for sure! Sounds like you've got some feisty calves there! Didn't know calves could do so much damage.

Dark water...new water well...that is a serious issue.
Our hard water here is clear, but over time dulls/yellows all our white clothes.

My plan to spray Garlic Mustard got rained out today.
Plan B: Bundle up and start digging more of the nasty stuff. It wasn't a pouring rain, just sort of a drizzle, so I got a lot more dug out.

...just curious if those were actuually culms or possibly limbs, although they look like culms.
Goodness, there sure is a lot to learn about bamboos! I'll keep watching the emerging shoots to see if any come up pointed/spearlike.

I bent some of the dried-looking culms on the plant that suffered cold wind damage. One culm snapped, and half-a-dozen others did not. In fact, I looked closely, and as I bent some of them I noticed that one side of the culms showed dark green coloring...still alive, I guess. I didn't try bending all of the drier culms, because I was standing in the cold drizzle w/o a coat. (Not too smart sometimes.)

I was thinking where else I could plant a div. of Rufa on my property, where it wouldn't suffer from early cold Spring winds. That's will be a challenge, since we're on a hill, and it's always breezy or windy. I could prob'ly find a place in the East woods, which is somewhat sheltered from the prevailing West winds, but it would have to compete with too many wild/native plants, and it would be too far away for me to take care of and watch closely.

I did a little browsing on Rufa, and several people say that Rufa is one of the fastest growing Fargesias, as far as sending up new culms every year. Here's one quote from the Bamboo forums at bamboocraft.net:
It generates prolific quantitys of culms each year.
A division of 6 culms will have multiplied almost 10 times in 3 years.

At that rate, I could have a whole bunch of new plants in a short amount of time.
But WHERE TO PUT THEM ALL?!?!?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

A division of 6 culms will have multiplied almost 10 times in 3 years.

That's about normal for the smaller clumping Bambusas here. Bambusas are pretty, but I really like the look of the Fargesias.

Dark water...new water well...

I don't have a new waterwell here. This well was drilled back in 1972, next to an earlier older well. Apparently it has a steel well pipe instead of the newer and more commonly used PVC pipe, which is starting to flake and mix with the water causing it to look like tea.

I flushed it from noon today to about 7pm, after I got through putting new boards in my pens, and the water was running clear.

I put in another new filter and will see how long it stays clear.

I still haven't got a well drilled out at the country...that's another whole story and another thing on the list.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Bambusas are pretty, but I really like the look of the Fargesias.
Browsed a little and I guess Bambusas can be very tall!
And it appears that the culms are bare on their lower sections.

Fargesias remind me of fountains.
I found this picture of a Rufa shoot emerging. Looks like tiny leaves at the very tip.

Glad to hear you now have clear water.

Is it Cool Water?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Fargesia nitida's common name is 'Fountain Bamboo'. That is one that used to have.

My tallest Bambusa is 44 feet...give or take a few inches. They become bare on the lower culms after they reach large size, probably and/or partially due to lack of direct sunlight on the lower culms. They will grow taller under better conditions.

I have one Bambusa that is listed to grow to 75 feet. That would be cool!

That picture is definitely a new shoot. It is growing farther away from the other culms. The underground limbs that grow from underground nodes on existing culms generally lean outward and grow very close to the existing culms.

Cool Water...definitely a cool song.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I went out again today and looked more closely at both Rufas and observed where all the new shoots were emerging.

All new shoots around rufa in the wind tunnel emerged close to the mother plant. So maybe they're all limbs from underground nodes.

Rufa in the garage bed is spreading with oodles more shoots. Some emerge from close to the mother plant, but a few others came up a good two inches away. Most of those shoots/culms are a good 6-10" tall now, and I don't see any new short shoots emerging. So maybe I have a combination of new shoots and underground limbs growing from that more vigorous Rufa.

I'll keep looking though, to see if any more shoots are just starting. I'm hoping the plants as a whole get a little taller this year.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

It should get larger and taller each year until it reaches maturity in your area.

The limbs won't grow as large as the new culms, they will be short.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I used to subscribe to half a dozen different magazines, then narrowed it down to four.

Four is still too many to keep up with the reading, especially with all that's happened this past year.

I will soon narrow it down to two. I keep up with reading the Daylily mags that I get regularly, but the rest have been piling up to the point that I'm a full year behind.

I've been taking one or two in my rolling tote to work because I often have a few minutes where I can read a bit.

Anyway, I picked up a March/April 2009 'Chicagoland Gardening' issue from my end table to take to work with me, and browsed through the table of contents. There happens to be an article titled, "A Plant to Save the Planet?" with the subtitle: Bamboo is starting to look like the answer to an environmentalist's prayer.

The article is six pages long with tiny print and a few pictures. (I carry a magnifying glass that lights up, to aid my eyesight, and prevent straining.) Anyway, I thought you'd get a kick out of this news. I will read it hopefully this week, and report back here with any highlights from the article. I'm hoping, since the magazine has articles about plants that can be grown in the Chicagoland area (which is the same zone as mine,) that it might feature some varieties that will grow well here.

Oh, BTW, this is NO indication that I might be getting addicted to Bamboo;)

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

You're in denial! :)

I do know that bamboo is the most used plant in the entire world. It is also the fastest growing, so there are signs that it might help renew felled trees and forests that help cleaned the air.

It is becoming more widespread and used more often in areas where it isn't common, and not just for landscaping.

It can grow where other plants don't do well and can also eliminate/break down toxins from the soil.

Can't wait to hear about the article.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

...denial...very funny!!!

Didn't have time to start the article today.
I took a half day off from work to do some chores for my Mom, then spent a few hours outside at my place mowing grass, and dividing & transplanting Hostas....I was in Heaven :)))))
Hope to do more of the same work outside tomorrow, until the setting sun forces me indoors.

We're supposed to get rain/T-storms Sat. & Sun., so I have a better chance to get the article read then, when I'm stuck indoors.

Or maybe I'll get some free time at work tomorrow.

I'll keep you posted.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I did the same here, today.

I took off this afternoon, replaced the blades on my mower(you'd laugh if you saw the old ones), mowed my entire yard, inside and out(over 2 hours) then weed-eated(or is it weed-ate), and now I can remove my plants from my greenhouses this weekend.

We have rain(T-storms) predicted here also, but I think it will go north of here.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I had a chance to read the article today, and there were a lot of statements made that I already knew, because of what you taught me.

I think there will be more of an effort to educate the public - not only beginning gardeners, but experienced gardeners - about bamboo in the upper Midwest. There may be more of a push to sell the more hardy varieties in Northern nurseries in the next few years.

I get the idea that some people think bamboo is more of a weed, because some varieties are hard to get rid of, so Bamboo gets a bad rap from "uneducated" gardeners.

The statements you mentioned in your post Thu, Apr 22, 10 at 20:47 were covered in the article, in fact you very well could have written the article, I'm sure!

Some highlights:

Bamboo can be harvested and re-grown so much more quickly than trees like pine, oak, maple and redwood...thus it promises to be a viable renewable resource for the future.
I just don't think the bamboo will grow as tall up here as the hardwood trees, but maybe in zones 6 or 7.

Bamboo helps to cool the environment because of its effectiveness in absorbing heat.
Now that I didn't know! Another part of the article mentioned planting several bamboos along a sunny side of a home to help cool the home and provide shade.

The varieties we can grow around here are limited, because of our cold, windy winters. But if they are hardy, and planted in the right location, the runners could run rampant, ending up in your neighbor's yard....then it goes into the long explanation of installing barriers.

There are some nice dwarf varieties that can be grown as ground covers under trees.

Two natives were mentioned that I've never heard of that can be grown in zones 4, 5, and 6:
Arundinaria gigantea and A. gigantea tecta. I will have to look those two up, because I don't know if they're clumpers or runners. Have you ever heard of either of them?

And of course a whole variety of Fargesias are hardy, but also many Phyllostachys (which I haven't researched yet.)

I might try to look for some variety that is tolerant to wind, since our site is on a windy hill. Our North woods is somewhat sheltered from the wind...it might be neat to try and start some runners there, to see if they could compete with the natives. Hmmmmm, something to think about. Acording to the article, more that 30 varieties can suposedly survive here.

The article goes into pruning/thinning/cutting out dead culms/removing lower branches to reveal the beauty of the culms, etc.

Oh! And the deer don't like to eat bamboo!

Bamboo is evergreen and it is natural for leaves to fall off and be replaced by new ones. Well, no wonder my rufa behind the garage stayed green all winter!

One place in the article said that bamboo doesn't need to be fertilized to be healthy, but another paragraph said to feed with a high nitrogen fertilizer....hummmm...confusing.

You have mentioned in the past that watering newly planted bamboos is very important. The article mentions that too, saying that you should water almost daily, especially on hot, windy days.

There are lists of bamboos that are good for containers, and others that are especially hardy for this area.

Phyllostachys nigra would be cool to try, but it's not reliably hardy here.

All in all, if people in this area want to grow bamboo, they need to educate themselves about growing conditions, and have a control method.

F. rufa is grown in one of Chicago's Parks. So, it looks like I made a good choice in purchasing my rufa.

I think I will tear the aritcle out of the magazine and put it in my "Bamboo folder" for future reference.

Hmmmm, that was long-winded.

Julie


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RE: Bamboodd thread five

We were typing/posting at the same time again.

Arundinaria gigantea and A. gigantea tecta, I read, are the only bamboos native to the U.S. They were very useful to native American Indians.

Phyllostachys nigra...if you want to try this bamboo, don't buy any, as I have more than I can handle here. I will get some pics of some in a pot when I get around to it.

Kt


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RE: Bambocco thread five

Also, yes, bamboo can grow very well without ever being fertilized. I fertilize to increase and speed up growth and to hasten root/rhizome growth.

Also, not all bamboos shed their leaves at once, then regrow them like some trees.

In some bamboos, the change is subtle. The leaves will fall as new ones are regrowing so it never appears to de-shed.

Some varieties will lose most of their leaves at once, then start regrowing new onces.

I mentioned above your article(3 posts up), that I worked in my yard today. I noticed some escape P. nigra popping up around the yard. It's a fast and aggressive runner here. Yesterday, I removed some culms from my workplace in town, as it was starting to spread and put up shoots through the edges of the asphalt driveway.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Yes, I noticed after I submitted my last reply that I was typing as you were posting.

Isn't it nice to be able to take half a day off work once in a while, just to putter around at home, even if it's work? Good to hear you can finally remove plants from your greenhouse, so they don't "cook" in temps that might get too hot!

P. nigra with its dark culms might look nice behind my garage, which is white. That's also my micro climate, that could possible behave more like zone 6. If you truly have too much of it, I surely would like to try some, but would want to send you something in trade. Would you by any chance want to try some of my F. rufa, or do you think your climate would be too hot? OR I have zillions of daylilies! My evergreens would grow nicely in your climate. Think about it, and maybe we could do a trade in the future.

Any bamboo that shoots up through asphalt has got to be one tough variety!

There was mention (in the article) about growing bamboo in containers, then bringing them in for the winter, even putting them in the basement and letting them go dormant, then bringing them out in the Spring. Since I'm retiring, I would have more time to care for container-grown plants. Well, maybe I could try one or two.

(What have you got me into...Hey! If you get me hooked on bamboo, I'm going to retaliate and get you hooked on daylilies!)

I need a greenhouse! But I'd hate to think of the heating costs for my area....never mind.

Later...

Julie


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RE: Bamboo threafdd five

Yes, it felt great to get my lawn work done. Great day for it here even though it got over 90F.

I recently got rid of my two best potted P. nigras, but I will see what else I have available.

I don't know anything about bringing plants inside(basement) and letting them go dormant, but I read often of people doing it, especially with bananas.

Here, I have to repot P. nigra every second year to keep it healthy looking, but you could probably go twice as long up there.

I used to have Arundinaria gigantea and A. gigantea tecta in pots. I may still have some, I'll check and see.

I could see myself getting hooked on daylilies...it's happened with a few other plants since bamboo.

I thought about small greenhouses in colder regions. I thought about some of those small 8' X 10'(or maybe smaller) greenhouses and putting a butane or kerosene heater inside(with ventilation of course), and putting the plants up off of the ground. EVen a few degrees of warmth can make a huge difference.

Just thinking and talking...I would be trying all kinds of crazy ideas if I lived in your area. I do some crazy things when it comes to plant survival.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Update: This afternoon I removed all of my plants from my large greenhouse. It was a relief until I realized that I still have the greenhouse inside of my yard with plants in it!

Anyway, here are a couple of pics of P. nigra at my office in town. Quality is not very good, but you can get the idea.

In the first pic, you can see how I keep it trimmed. No lower limbs and making shoots grow in a tight area giving it a clumping look.

I severe the roots/rhizomes around the 'clump' about twice a year to keep it from spreading, and this makes it shoot within the confined area.

In the second pic, you can see the bricks that I use to straighten crooked culms as they emerge. A few days with a brick next to the new shoot is all it takes.

Picture 1.

Picture 2.

I have a few varieties of P. nigra, but there is one called 'Othello' that supposedly, as it runs, it puts up tightly packed areas of culms, does that makes sense? It may be a bamboo for a pot, however, I see no difference in the Othello and the regular black bamboo.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I have been researching Arundinaria gigantea and have discovered it prefers moist soil, which I don't have here, and it is only hardy to zone 6. I don't know why the article I read said it could be grown in zones 4, 5, & 6.
Sounds too "iffy" for my site.

Fargesias seem to be the most favorable for my zone.

Will look into the Phyllostachys one of these days.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thsread five

Oh, and I DO still have a pot of Arundinaria gigantea, and it needs to be divided, so if you want to try it later on, I'll have some.

Also, in the black bamboo pics above, the new culms are green, then turn black by the end of the year(here anyway).

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

There you go again, posting while I was typing!

Your P. nigra looks great next to the white wall! It looks like a dozen or so culms, forming a nice looking group, almost like a tree.

Why are some of the culms black, and some green?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread fiver

Again, posting while I was typing...and you answered my question of why some culms are green and some black.

I'll have to think about the A. gigantea. Did you see what I posted at 23:04?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Did you see what I posted at 23:04?

Yes. That's why I reposted and mentioned it. It's getting to be very confusing since we are simultaneously posting...I have to keep going back over all the posts to see if I missed any of your posts!

I have several bamboos that are only cold hardy to around 25F, and some only to 30F, which as I mentioned before, means that they are usually another 10 degrees cold hardy for the roots/rhizomes.

Without any protection, the extremely low and lengthy cold spell this past Winter killed off many clumps completely to the ground, but almost each day I find one plant that is putting up new growth which is great for me but also making them even more cold hardy than I previously thought.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Your P. nigra looks great next to the white wall!

Thank you. It's just another experiment.

The leaves look kind of bad coming through Winter but that is normal each year. In Summer they are darker green and much healthier looking.

P. nuda is supposedly the hardiest of the phyllostachys at -20F...so several degrees colder for the underground roots/rhizomes.

Just talking...

I didn't get any pics of any potted black bamboos today, maybe this week sometime.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Thanks for the tip on P. nuda. I'll look that one up hopefully tomorrow.
I still have to find time to research those Phyllostachys more.

Oh, and thanks for mentioning that the roots are more cold hardy than the top growth...I forgot about that...you need to keep repeating that kind of info to me....to much to remember about bamboo!

I found a site where it mentions that Arundinaria Gigantea is growing at the Denver Zoo, which is zone 5. So, that's good news, huh?

I just might take you up on your offer of some of your A. Gigantea. But you never did give me an answer when I mentioned a few posts above that I would want to send you something in trade. Do you think you'd be able to grow F. rufa in your climate, or could I interest you in some daylilies that would do well in the South?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I may try the Rufa and/or daylilies.

I grew F. nitida and F. murieliae, but lost them a couple of years ago. After the cows were looking for something green to eat, then the extreme heat and drought set in, well it was too much for them.

Right now, I really don't need any more plants to care for since I'm trying to get things done at the country and an area ready for planting next year(supposed to have been THIS year). Seems I'm getting father behind every day.

But yes, I would at least like to try some daylilies though, when the time is right.

I spent about 40 minutes watering potted plants today. That's time that I just can't spare. If it were daylight until midnight, I'd be working outside...I rarely am in bed for 7 hours each night. Go to bed no earlier than 10:30pm(usually much later) and get up at 5:30am every morning.

I just received three bamboos from a guy in California that I trade with. I will be sending him some when I can get the plants down to a smaller size. I wish I had more time to trade plants with people since I really enjoy it...just don't have the time.

Anyway, I can send you some bamboo when you want some. We can work out a trade. But I can wait for later to get my half of the trade. I am in no hurry.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I found P. nuda at a couple of different sites, and one site said it's hardy to -10, the other site said -20, with roots hardy to -30. That one's looking pretty good right now, but I see it's a runner. Can you plant runners in pots?

I understand about not having time to do all that you want to do. This is a very busy time for me also, at work, and here at home with upkeep of the lawns (mowing) and weeding the gardens. Late May and early June will get even crazier, as I have over 100 plants arriving, most of them daylilies. This will be the last huge amount of ordering (all at once) I will do for a long time. When I retire I will have to watch how much I spend on mail-order plants.

How about we talk about trading in a couple of months (or even later this summer) when both of us (hopefully) can catch our breath.

I would be glad to send you some of my Rufa, plus some daylilies. Do you by any chance have some P. nuda?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Yes, runners can be planted in pots, as I do with many of my phyllostachys. I have some in 25 gallon pots. The larger the pot, the better they will do, but the harder it is to move the plant. BUT, smaller runners will look good longer than large runners, in pots that is.

However,(and this applies to here down south), they tend to look good for one or two seasons before needing dividing and repotting.

Clumpers tend to last longer and look better longer in a pot.

I hope that makes sense.

Unfortunately, I ran out of room for runners before I ever got any P. nuda.

P. bissetii is also a hardy runner. Just a thought.

Here are a couple of sites to look at. They will give you an idea of some of the bamboos sold in the USA and state suppliers.

American Bamboo Society

Bamboo Suppliers List

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Hmmmmmmm, I guess planting directly in the ground would be easier, or I'd be re-potting too often...also watering more often.

I might try to think of an area where a runner could spread freely, but out of the winter wind...another project to think about.

Thanks for the links! I'll find some time tomorrow to browse them.

julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I browsed the bamboo source list, and found vendors in Idaho, Ohio, Michigan, Colorado and New Jersey, all selling cold hardy varieties. I really want to try a runner, but will survey my property for the best possible area. There is an extensive North "open" woods area where I might be able to clear out some brambles, and start a Bamboo grove - just look what you got me into - well, just ideas so far. There's got to be at least half-day sun available for some of those varieties.

I may not be able to start this bamboo project for another year, since I have all these daylilies coming in a few weeks, but I will have time to observe weather patterns, esp. windy sites, then determine where a good site might be to start experimenting.

My son is presently out of work, so I'm going to "hire" him to do some heavy yardword, especially preparing a huge daylily bed, moving dirt, woodchips, and edging some gardens. He's always willing to help me any time I ask.

Thanks again for the links!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

You're welcome.

Just to let you know...most of the larger runners, like the phyllostachys, like full sun, but I keep my potted bamboos under oak trees where they get dappled or little direct sunlight. They do very well and the soil in the pots does not dry out so fast that way either.

I keep some up against my house where they get no direct sunlight and they look great. I think bright sun is more important than direct sunlight. Of course, sunlight here is probably a bit more intense than your Summer sun.

Sometimes in pots, they will get less dense and in some varieties, the leaves will be a lighter colour, but other than that, they do just fine.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

...most of the larger runners, like the phyllostachys, like full sun,...
Good to know!
I guess the Fargesias can handle more shade.

The area I'm thinking of experimenting with is full of black raspberries, which would need clearing out. This area gets full sun all day, except for maybe a couple of hours in the morning, and maybe an hour or two at the end of the day, as the sun sets behind existing trees.

I sure hope I remember all this info when and if I decide to try some runners in a few months...or next year!
Be patient with me, Kt. I sometimes need things repeated several times before info sinks in .

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

No problem, I like to help others so that they don't have to waste time learning on their own.

As I mentioned before, different areas make plants act differently. So what is common knowledge here may not always work in your colder region.

As I mentioned above, 'larger runners like full sun' but they do very well in shade or low sunlight areas.

Black bamboo does best in dappled shade. It needs shade for the culms to turn black. Too much direct sunlight will make the culms look spotted and may take sometimes a year or two to turn completely black, if then. Also, after some upper growth, it provides shade for it's own culms as the plant grows, so that helps to blacken the culms.

Shaded bamboo here though, may be like full sun in your area, I can't say.

Just talking...

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Jule, this guy grows about a dozen bamboos. I haven't heard from him in a while, but he posted recently, and it sounds like his boo is doing great just northwest of you.

Bamboo In Brookfield, WI.

Kt


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RE: Bamboox thread five

Rokwiz1 is the guy I'm talking about...

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Thanks for the link, Kt!

I will try and e-mail him, or maybe will reply to his post soon.

Right now I'm exhausted because of end-of-the-year activities at work, and many evening events going on. I feel like I'm running on auto pilot half the time.

We went to my second "retirement dinner" tonight, and I feasted on a five course meal, and had a little too much to drink, (Brandy & Sour,) so my fuzzy brain needs to be put to rest for the night.

My rufas are growing taller than they were last year, and the one by the house that had half of the culms dead (or browned) is filling in with lots of new green leaves.

Will keep you posted.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I haven't talked to him through posts on the Bamboo Forum in a while since he has been low profile, but he's back now. I remember him having several bamboos, but forgot that he lived in WI.

I feasted on a five course meal...

Sounds nice! I bet you enjoyed that!

Brandy & Sour

Sour what? You should save the drinking for weekends:)...that way you have recovery time in case of a slight hangover.;)

My rufas are growing taller than they were last year...

Generally, even with freezing back, bamboo will get larger each consecutive growing season up to a point where it reaches it's mature size for that area.

If they keep some of their 'green'...such as leaves and culms, then they will grow large faster.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Re: The five course meal: I couldn't finish all of the Lobster, and took half of it home, and finished it off today.

Sour what?
You've never heard that combination? (Brandy & sour?) When we went to Baltimore a couple of years ago, the bartenders didn't know how to make that drink either. It must be a Upper Midwest thing. The "sour" refers to a soda like 'Squirt' or 50-50. (Now don't tell me you don't have those sodas down South, either.)

I only had two mixed drinks, but I think the bartender mixed them strong, because I got a "buzz" after drinking half a glass. I didn't get a hangover, because I had plenty to eat, but my thinking/reasoning was a little slow. I'm not used to drinking any kind of alcohol except on rare occasions only a few times/year, so a drink will really do me in if I'm not careful.

I'll try and shoot a pic of the rufa next to the house some time soon, because all the new green growth is starting to hide the brown culms. I'm very pleased with the fullness of the clump. The spot next to the house is perfect, because it makes a nice accent. The rufa planted behind the garage bed is somewhat hid by other perennials that are growing faster and taller, because they are more established. I just need to be patient while it creeps along this year.

Julie


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RE: Bambood thread five

I kind of thought that's probably what the 'sour' meant. Big beer drinkers down here, maybe a little shine now and then.

I enjoy margaritas(on ice) not frozen, but will drink either. I used to be a big zombie drinker...very fruity tasting. Hurricanes were ok, but not a real desired drink for my taste.

We used to open a bottle of beer, drink some then refill it with whiskey, bet you haven't done that!

I haven't had a drink since January 17th of this year. I guess I'm geting old...

Looking forward to the Rufa pics!

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I had to look up what a zombie was. Sounds good! I have had margaritas, but they're almost too cold with all that ice. Never had a hurricane.

The beer w/whiskey filler sounds dangerous!

I haven't had a drink since January 17th of this year. Are you talking "mixed" drinks? Or are you including beer, too?

I still prefer wine to mixed drinks, but seldom drink it unless on special occasions.

I'll wait a little bit longer to snap a pic of rufa. Hopefully both plants will still grow more so I can show you how much taller they are this year...still growing slowly (I think.)

I'm up to my ears in daylilies. Planting them is easy if I happen to hit good soil. Not so easy if I hit heavy clay that doesn't drain well.

My mind wanders when I stroll around my property, thinking of places I could clear and plant divisions of this and that, maybe with a bamboo for an accent. I'm afraid I'm biting off more than I can chew though, when I can't keep up with the weeding.

Will have to start watering with the sprinkler soon, for the first time this year. Garden beds are drying out from the hot winds we had last week.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Are you talking "mixed" drinks?

I haven't had any alcohol since 01/17. I was tempted to drink a beer the other night though after a long hard day's work outside...that's when an ice cold longneck tastes the best.

Planting them is easy if I happen to hit good soil.

Mine should be blooming any day now.

My mind wanders...I'm afraid I'm biting off more than I can chew though...

It's fun to let your mind wander and take into consideration all the different possiblities for planting things.

"Biting off more than"...yes, tell me about it. I've felt that way for the last two years now.

I've got sprinklers going now. I will move them once more before calling it a night.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Biting off more than I can chew....I've been feeling it these last few days, because the weeds have gotten waaaaay out of hand, and I have to spend hours on each garden, trying to rid them of aggressive weeds that block the textures of all the different perennials. I might finish by November:(

I was feeling depressed after being on my hands and knees for so many hours today, I decided to take some time off and just stroll the grounds and take some pics.

I've taken 150 pics in the last fours days, most of them today. It was totally relaxing!

Anyway, I promised I'd share a pic of Rufa, so here is the one growing next to the house. I had snapped off one brown culm in early Spring, but the others didn't snap, and as you instructed, I left them alone.

It's hard to see from the picture how much taller it grew, actually not much, only 6" or so, but look how fat & sassy it has become!:

click:
Fargesia Rufa

Rufa in the raised bed behind the garage is bigger, but I can't get a decent picture of it, because there is a huge Sedum growing in front of it, and they are both competing for space. Rufa says, "Get that Sedum out of my way!" Sedum says, "Get me away from that pushy bamboo!"

I'll move the Sedum either this Fall, or early next Spring. Then I'll plant some low-growing annuals in front of Rufa to compliment/show it off.

I'm so proud of my Rufas!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Very Nice!!!! It may not grow much above ground the first couple of years but it will eventually get larger.

Many of my bamboos are starting to recover from the hard freeze we had this past Winter, but many are growing back from the ground...leaving all the top growth(some over 40 feet tall) dead. I have yet to remove it all but that's low down on my list of things to do.

Thanks for sharing that pic. That is one healthy looking bamboo!!

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Thanks, Kt!

Glad to hear many of your bamboos are starting to recover, but sad to hear about the loss of the top growth.

You must be a very patient man, to not be devastated by so much loss, and willing to wait for new growth to start again from ground level.

I'm tempted to take another division from one of the Rufas and plant it in a new area, to test it to see if it can survive a less protected area. On the other hand, I'd hate to disturb the roots a second year in a row, which might slow the growth. Maybe I should be a PATIENT lady, and leave them be for a while!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo threffad five

That's another reason that I like bamboo, it grows very fast. Once mature, the culms grow from ground to full height in 90 days or less...even the 70+ footers.

That fast growth helps keeps my lack of patience at bay.:)

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

That fast growth helps keeps my lack of patience at bay.
I'm sure it does!
But you still seem like the patient type anyway, esp. if you take cuttings from shrubs and can wait years for them to mature!

I'll keep you posted if there are any dramatic changes with Rufa.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Yes, I guess you are right about the cuttings and my patience, but with as many plants as I have growing and in all stages of growth, there is always something maturing throughout the year every year, so I hardly notice the waiting period.

Here's what I'm facing today, but don't think I'll get any of it done.

The first pic is two of my timber bamboos that have both died to the ground. They are at least 44 feet tall and they need to be cut down. Each clump is about 10 to 12 feet in diameter.

The second pic shows the right clump again with a different bamboo beside it which is more of a bushy growing bamboo but it has razor sharp thorns and is going to be very difficult to remove.

After these three clumps, I still have 8 more to go...and a few smaller clumps.

Photobucket Photobucket

Do you recognize the tree hanging in the upper left corner of the pics?

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Good grief, Kt!

You sure have your work cut out!
How sad to see all that dead growth. It must have taken several years to reach that height. But I can see the new green growth at the bases of the dead culms. With the mature root systems, will they recover their mature height quickly?

I imagine the job of removing the dead culms is complicated, because you don't want to step on all the new growth, huh?

So, what tool do you use to cut them down?
Can you use the dead culms for stakes? ...or anything useful?...or do you have to burn them?

Looks like the thorny bamboo has several feet of new growth at the base. I suppose you wear thick leather gloves when wrestling with that one?

Do you recognize the tree hanging in the upper left corner of the pics?
I would guess it's a Black Walnut, right?

So, how much did you get removed today?

Did I ask you enough questions?:)

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

It must have taken several years to reach that height.

Actually, those two clumps in the first pic reached that height in about 4 or 5 years from a 1 gallon pot, but the culms continued to get thicker for a couple of years after that. The bamboo completely froze to the ground it's first two Winters and got burnt severely in it's third year, then freeze burn was minimal until this year.

...will they recover their mature height quickly?

Unfortunately the root system appears to be damaged also so it may take a couple of years, maybe three, to regain it's height.

...because you don't want to step on all the new growth, huh?

It will be difficult to keep from damaging all of the new growth, but the damage won't be enough to set the plant back. That's one reason that I don't mind letting the new growth get some size, that way just before the new shoots start popping up, I can go and remove the old growth and all of the 'new fuel' will already be stored up for the new growth...did that make sense?

So, what tool do you use to cut them down?

I normally used a small sharp handsaw made for limb pruning. During a normal year, I will usually have a few to remove and the handsaw works great, but with the whole plant gone on top, I will probably use a chainsaw, after cinching the top culms together with a rope.

Can you use the dead culms for stakes?

The yearling culms are all too soft and beginning to rot already. Normally, older culms are great for building, but the freeze seems to have done something to the culms to make them rot...strange.

The bamboo in the first pic has culms over 4 inches thick, so if any are usuable, I will used them for fencing or sell them. I have smaller clumps of different kinds of bamboo that have very thick culms and they make great stakes or canes for building trellises and such.

The unusable culms I will burn or put along my creek here where I don't want my cows walking. As I mentioned before, bamboo supposedly got it's name from the louds BAM that it makes when you burn it. Those big culms might sound like cannons going off.

Looks like the thorny bamboo has several feet of new growth at the base.

Yes, I wear gloves when I work with that one. Actually, most of the new growth in that picture is from four pots of similar thorny bamboo in front of that clump. Three of those were the ones that I removed from out at the country a while back that I told you about. They were dying so I dug them up and repotted them and now they look great again.

...Black Walnut, right?

You are correct!

So, how much did you get removed today?

None. If the plants were away from other plants or outside of my yard, the task would be much easier. Cutting them down won't be a problem, but hauling them away will be. First, I have to remove the culms from my yard. Then I have to separate the good ones from the bad ones, then I have to haul them away.

In the first pic, you can see a fernleaf bamboo to the very left of the tall bamboo, and if you look closely, you can see a green bamboo(four clumps), that didn't freeze, behind the two larger dead clumps of bamboo. These other bamboos will also make it difficult to remove the larger bamboo without hurting the green healthy ones.

It might be a couple of weeks before I get another chance to work in my yard.

I could retire tomorrow and have enough to keep me busy for at least three months working sun up to sundown, and that's if I stop helping my neighbours.

I hate being this far behind...

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Thanks for taking the time to answer all my questions, especially when you have so little time!

Re: damaging the new growth...
I don't mind letting the new growth get some size, that way just before the new shoots start popping up, I can go and remove the old growth and all of the 'new fuel' will already be stored up for the new growth...did that make sense?
Actually, no, I don't get it. What's the difference between new growth and new shoots?

...after cinching the top culms together with a rope.
I have a vision of the whole bunch of them falling together. Timber!!!!

...and that's if I stop helping my neighbours.
Perhaps after you're finished helping them, THEY could come to your yard and help you!

Not much time left for playing guitar, I bet.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

What's the difference between new growth and new shoots?

Most of the bamboos that froze to the ground are clumpers and don't normally shoot until mid-Summer or Fall. The new growth is all limbs and leaves from the base of the culms or the parts that didn't freeze, even some from just under the ground.

These bamboos spend the Sping and early sumer months building up energy and storing it in the rhizomes for when the plant shoots, unlike running bamboos that normally shoot first thing in the Spring and then after shooting is done and culms are mature height, they spend the rest of the year building up their energy supplies for shooting the next Spring.

Does that make better sense?

I have a vision of the whole bunch of them falling together. Timber!!!!

Yes, it will fall all at once, and will also keep the cut culms out of my way as I cut others...hmmmm, maybe that's why they call it 'Timber' bamboo??:)

...come to your yard and help you!

I would never ask anyone for help. I'm just that way.

Not much time left for playing guitar, I bet.

Interesting you mention that. I have picked up the guitar a few times here recently, and played very well(by my standards anyway). I thought I would be out of practice but even if I was, I enjoyed it and that's what it's all about for me.

I get in late and like to go out on my porch in the dark and pick a little. The sound is better at night also but it mainly helps me unwind.

When I was much younger and had a rough day or a bad day or something was bothering me, I would like to go for a ride on my motorcycle and let the wind blow all my worries away...now I do the same with the guitar.

That's probably why I have soooo many hobbies, they keep my mind relaxed, just like you mentioned with taking pics the other day and how relaxing it was. I like photography for the same reason among others.

How about you? Any guitar picking since you retired, or are you taking a break form your six strings for a while?

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Re: difference between new growth and new shoots...
O.K. now I get it. Thanks for the explanation. I think you mentioned that my rufas may have sent up new growth coming from the crown (underground) rather that new shoots, which would show up farther away from the plant.
So maybe mine will send up new shoots later in the Summer or Fall. Remind me to look for them later, O.K.?

I would never ask anyone for help.
Well, you continue to amaze me...a hard worker on your own land, but always willing to help your neighbors. Do you have a constant renewable source of human energy, or what?

I think you've played your guitar more than I have lately. Various activities have kept me from playing, but most of all, my back and neck have been so stiff lately, that playing my guitar is out of the question for a while. I am getting better though, with all the stretching exercises I have to do.

I was getting good during the winter months for a while, and now I am back to the rusty stage. I think I should try playing soon, even with a still back. Maybe the sound of the music will cause me not to think about pain in my neck & back.

I sure am having fun taking pics though. Got all my hostas photographed, now working on all of my daylilies. Labeling them all with text added to all is time consuming. But I've got so many in my collections now that I can't remember all their names just by sight. I've just about had my fill of daylilies for a while. I have so many that several are starting to look alike. Time to start concentrating on something else....maybe shrubs.

Don't wear yourself out too much...have fun in your yard(s) as much as possible.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Do you have a constant renewable source of human energy, or what?

I wish! I've got to keep moving.

Don't wear yourself out too much...have fun in your yard(s) as much as possible.

I look forward to Sunday mornings, at least the Sundays that I don't have to go in to work, since I get to sleep late, sometimes to 7:30.

Then after church, breakfast, or whatever else, then it's off to work in the yard for a while.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I've got to keep moving.
I guess that's the secret then. If a person sits down for a break too long, it's harder to get moving again!

I just noticed something strange with both rufas today.
New culms have started to grow really fast, mostly around the edges of the clumps, and now are about 6" taller than the rest of the clump. These culms have no leaves, except a couple at the very top.

I haven't checked closely in a long time, but could these be the ones I saw in early April, and they are just now noticeable because they' taller than all the other (older) culms? I wonder when these mostly bare culms will start producing more foliage & branching.

I'm sure you've explained all this to me before, but I can't remember all you said about when every new stage starts. (dizzy brain here.)

I'm thinking I should see new shoots just emerging later this summer, and farther away from the mother plant, right?

Am I making any sense?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

These culms have no leaves...

Yes, new culms usually grow to their full height before putting on branches and leaves...other than a few leaves at the top of the new shoot/culm.

I'm thinking I should see new shoots just emerging later this summer, and farther away from the mother plant, right?

Yes, you are making sense. Sometimes new shoots will pop up among the existing clump also, but as the clump expands with age, generally the new shoots will be at the outer edges of the existing clump.

I'm not real familiar with rufa(Fargesias) so I don't know it's normal shooting season, but most clumpers shoot at the end of the Summer. I have one bamboo that shoots very late in the year. The culms will generally reach full height just as the cold of Winter sets in, then it will leave-out the following Spring, which is unusual since all other varieties of the same species will shoot and grow limbs and then leave out before late Fall.

After saying all that...some bamboos(Bambusas), depending on weather etc, can send up shoots all Summer long, but the highest concentration comes in late Summer.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I don't remember rufa sending up new shoots last year, but then, I didn't expect it to do anything other than get it's roots comfy & established.

I'm keeping a record of what it does, and when, so I'll sort of know what to expect next year. I'm so glad both plants are fairly sheltered from the hot, drying winds we've had lately. If they were planted out in the open, I'm sure their leaves would have been in tatters by now.
Makes me think negatively about taking a division and planting it in wide open spaces.

I've been watering both diligently, but not to the point of drowning. If the biggest concentration of new shoots happens later this Summer, I may have to move the Sedum away from rufa in the raised bed behind the garage sooner than planned!

Thanks, Kt, for taking the time to respond to my question.
I know you are very, very busy lately, trying to do so much to help your neighbor, and I imagine you are staying up late, watering your own plants, and caring for your cattle.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

You are welcome.

The recent and much needed rains have given me a break in all my work. I fertilized some of my bamboos late yesterday and just in time.

I'm starting to see some shooting now but the plants are set far back from the cold Winter and I may not see normal size shoots in many of my clumpers.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Finally found the most recent bamboo thread.

And how are your favorite boos doing this winter?
Still forever watering?

I don't think we'll have as much snow cover this winter, so my rufas may get wind blown and browned more than last winter.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

And how are your favorite boos doing this winter?
Still forever watering?

Thanks for asking.

Most of my boos are doing fine so far. We had two nights down into the mid to low 20's and they all survived fine. The wind was bad though and really dried out the leaves on a couple of varieties.

My country boos look good, even the not-so-cold hardy ones. They are protected by the thick woods. I think I will try a papaya there next year to see if it will survive without any protection.

Yes, I'm still watering(and waiting on my new well to be drilled at the country). I water in the dark during the week there. I shouldn't be watering at all at this time of the year, and I think I already lost some altheas...I just can't keep up with watering everything. Something will have to suffer, unfortunately.

30% chance of rain tonight, and keeping my fingers crossed.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

The wind was bad though and really dried out the leaves on a couple of varieties.
And I bet they're too big to protect with any kind of covering!

I think I will try a papaya there next year ...
Makes me imagine you really live in Hawaii.

...and I think I already lost some altheas...
a.k.a. Rose Of Sharon (up here)...I sure hope I don't lose my four (newly planted last summer) during their first winter.

I don't think I know anyone more dedicated that you when it comes to diligent watering.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I don't think I know anyone more dedicated that you when it comes to diligent watering.

I appreciate that comment...I think:), but I keep thinking the dry spell(s) will end...and I really have more important things that I should be doing.

It is crazy to see dust as you drive at this time of the year. I have never seen this amount of dust in the Winter time, that I can recall.

I think your rufas will be fine this year. I still wonder about damage from covering them, but they have had a full growing season to get their roots established some, and unless you have a really unusually cold Winter, I think they will be fine.

Next year they should really grow for you.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

Wow, a winter drought?
You must be draggin' your feet every night when you finally turn in, after all that watering and doing all the other chores you have around there.

I still wonder about damage from covering them,...
I don't understand what you mean.
The only thing I covered them with last winter was snow, which is a wonderful insulator.

The rufa next to the house may spread faster than I had planned, and if it does, I will have to remove more landscape fabric (which was already there when we bought the house.) Don't know what new shoots will do if they can't punch their way through the fabric. Might have to cut some of the fabric out next April, or even March if the area has thawed.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

I don't understand what you mean.

I was thinking of back when we talked about covering them, and how it might do more damage than not covering them. Some plants here will start to grow if they are warm enough, and cover will make them just warm enough to grow, so by Winter's end, the plant can use up all of it's stored energy and die before warm weather sets in. Does that make sense? I can explain better if I need to.

What does the landscape fabric look like? If it's the same thing I am thinking of, it does not last long here, maybe two or three years before rotting away.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo thread five

O.K. I see what you mean.

Up North we cover things AFTER the ground freezes, in order to keep them frozen, and to protect them from freeze/thaw cycles, which can heave plants right out of the ground.

Both rufas did fine last year, covered with snow most of the time. We're supposed to get less than normal snow fall this season, so both plants may be more exposed and turn brown, but I'm sure the root systems are well established, and will send up many new shoots next Spring.

The landscape fabric has not disintegrated in the 11 years we've been here, and shows no signs of doing so. It reminds me of plastic. In fact, it prob'ly IS plastic.
There are decorative rocks over the plastic, and through the years much leaf & twig debris has collected, decomposed, and provided an excellent medium for weeds to grow:( I almost wish the rocks weren't there, because it's a royal pain to pick out the weeds from between them.

It shouldn't be hard to remove more of the fabric/plastic from around the rufa by the house. I can easily cut it with a scissors.

Hope you get some decent rainfall soon, so you get a break from all that watering!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo thread five

re-arranging


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