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Photography Thread III

Posted by luvtosharedivs 5a WI (My Page) on
Mon, May 18, 09 at 23:54

Here we go again...it's me, the pest again...but remember, you said, if I ever had any questions...just ask...remember?

Anyway, I was browsing the Daylily forum, and there is a thread where members are talking about proper exposure for taking daylily photos to get the correct coloring according to what the naked eye sees. Someone mentioned carrying a white card/paper along to focus on for correct white balance. Interesting.

I then browsed my Canon book, and read where you can buy a card at a photography store that is 18% grey, which is used for white balance exposure. (I'm having difficulty explaining myself because it's late, and my brain is ready for sleep.)

So my question is, have you ever used one of those cards for adjusting your camera for correct white balance?
I can imagine that now, after many years of photography experience, you can judge white balance quickly, w/o the use of such a card. Have you used anything besides such a card for measuring/calculating white balance?

Your pest-of-a-student,

Julie


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Photography Thread III

I have never used any of those cards to get correct white balance.

The Canon A-1 and my Nikon both(luckily) have the shutter button that when you depress it halfway down, it locks in those settings, and then you can point the camera at your subject and depress it all the way to take a pic.

When white balance is needed, or for me I like to say, when I need a better coloured pic, if one pic does not have the desired colour, I will sometimes point the camera at a bright part of the sky, away from the sun usually near the horizon, then depress the shutter button halfway and hold til I have the desired subject back in the viewfinder, then take the pic.

This works satisfactory for me. I don't try to get too sophisticated. If it works, I tend to stick with it.

I hope this is what you were asking. My Nikon has a dial setting that easily changes the white balance, and being a digital, I can take several pics in several different settings until I get the one with the best colour. Did that make sense?

Maybe I can explain better tomorrow...it's been a long day.

Kt


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RE: Photography Thread III

Your explanation was just fine.
I was just curious to know if you had ever heard of focusing on a white card/sheet of paper, like some people talked about on the daylily thread.

Someone also mentioned setting the ISO speed correctly, and they didn't say which speed they used, but I'm sure it was set according to sunny VS. cloudy/shady conditions. (100-200 for sunny, 400 for cloudy/overcast...I think.)

Someone else mentioned that some cameras (like mine and yours that you mentioned above) have settings for white balance, like light conditions such as sunny, overcast, neon, incandescent, and even reflected light.

Oh, and then someone elso mentioned using small white umbrellas, or white photography filters - egads, what a bunch of extras some people must carry with them!

I think some daylily people want their photos to show accurate colors, (according to the hybridizers' descriptions,) if they're into selling on line, and they want prospective customers to be well informed.

I have seen websites with greatly exagerated, saturated photos that a trained eye can plainly "catch" and realize the photos aren't true to color. I stay away from sites like that. I would much rather see a vendor state that the photos are untouched, and may not be accurate. They tell their customers to rely more on the written descriptions.

For my own personal use, I just try my best to photograph on cloudy days, so that colors are not washed out. But now that I know more about ISO, I may pay more attention to that setting, if I'm trying to use the 'creative' zones.

I took my Canon book to work with me, thinking I'd have some extra time to read...didn't happen, but I'm keeping it in my rolling tote, just in case I have spare time...need to get back to studying about the complicated camera stuff.

This is an incredibly (sp?) busy season for me, both at work and at home. Much planting/transplanting to do, and boxes keep arriving faster than I can get things planted! I even have some bonus daylilys that vendors sent that I planted in temporary pots, until I can dig up more sod somewhere!

Took some bird photos, but they didn't turn out as good as Bob's, or Terras, but I still may post them some time soon...one of these days to bump spam on the 'other side'. Can't do it now...wrong computer.

Thanks for your advice about pointing your camera on a bright part of the sky for better coloring. Now, if I can only find the TIME to experiment! I'm exhausted just trying to keep up with life's fast pace lately!

Julie


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I have seen websites with greatly exagerated, saturated photos that a trained eye can plainly "catch"...

I've seen the same thing on several different nursery websites.

Thanks for your advice about pointing your camera on a bright part of the sky for better coloring. Now, if I can only find the TIME to experiment! I'm exhausted just trying to keep up with life's fast pace lately!

You're welcome. I try to keep things simple, myself. Some people go through a lot of extra effort because they don't know there is an easier way.

Yes, things are really busy and I'm getting farther behind. Re-hurt my knee and can hardly walk at times. If I had things done at the country, I'd go to the doctor, but I'm waiting on the builders, etc.

Nothing's getting done, and I'm falling apart...I guess it could be worse.

Kt


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RE: Photography Thread III

Re-hurt my knee and can hardly walk at times.

Oh, No!
That same knee? I suppose it wasn't quite healed from the LAST injury, then it gets injured again.

I think I'll have to start a prayer list:
Bob's glaucoma
Kt's knee
Sandy's blood tests
My own stress

My body has a way of complaining when I'm under stress, and it happens when I'm busy trying to fit everything into a tight "window" of time. Right now I have pains in my innards that I'm hoping will go away in the next couple of weeks when my schedule at work slows down. Don't want to make a Dr. appointment unless absolutely necessary.

I don't mean to complain...my situation is very mild compared to yours or Bob's.

Don't fall apart!
I'm praying for you...

Julie


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I don't mean to complain...my situation is very mild compared to yours or Bob's.

I don't mean to complain either...I know I'm falling apart, but it makes it hard to get things done. I just have to learn to work 'around' or 'with' my injuries. All part of getting old.

Thanks for your prayers...they can only help.

Praying Helps

Kt


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LOL!

Great message...advertising helps!

J.


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RE: Photography Thread III

Hi guys. I'm just going to hijack this thread for a little bit. I see what went on yesterday and just seeing what happens to this post if it will go to the top


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RE: Photography Thread III

Moving this post to the top, after having responded to some of the other un-responded-to threads.

Kt,
I found a great stress reliever today.
Work is causing me great stress lately, thus the pains inside me that I can't explain. I know for a fact the pains are from work stress, because when I do something completely FUN, wiping all other thoughts out of my brain, the stress pains go away.

Anyway, what I did after work was to grab my camera and I went outside and snapped pics of all my Hostas...over 160 pics in all. What a great feeling!

Julie


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Great!! You have learned well, Grasshopper.

Now, you know the secret of well-being and longevity.

Photography, growing things(bamboo...because it grows fast), palying the guitar, etc, all are things that relieve stress for me, and keep my mind off of aches and pains, and relieves them as well.

Digital photography is so much more gratifying than the old 35mm which had to be developed, and since free time is scarce for me, I can take pics, then go load them on the computer and see the results instantly...so much fun.

It's not uncommon for me to unload several hundred pics at a time...I do tend to get carried away sometimes, but as with a sunset, I will take as many pics as possible because I know it will never look that way again. Each sunset/sunrise is different.

Yes, it IS a great feeling. Hope to see some of those hosta pics soon.

Kt


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Now, you know the secret of well-being and longevity.
I need to retire before I can fully enjoy my hobbies.
Until then, an hour or two in the fresh air in my garden is a wonderful break from the hustle and bustle of life. I enjoy feeling like a kid, when I don't have to pay attention to the clock!

The only down side to taking photos in the late afternoon and a heavily overcast day, is that the flash kept going off, and I've forgotten how to disable it...back to the manual.

I'll try and post some of my favorite Hostas in the next few days.

Julie


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I don't know how to use my flash...I never turn it on. Even on my old A-1's, I have an attachable flash, that I never used, and I've had the cameras for decades.

I don't like the way a flash produces reflections and shadows, although you can do some really neat tricks using a flash.

Kt


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flash comment

The only time I like using a flash outside is to highlight a particular flower, thus making the background darker.

With the Hostas, the flash has made for some washed out coloring...BUT I sure did have fun anyway. I plan to take hundreds of photos again, later in the season, since Hostas often change their coloring throughout the Summer, and again in the Fall. Today was a good calm day with very little wind...so I wanted to take advantage of the stillness. Every year though, we get several nasty wind storms that tear some of the unprotected Hosta leaves to shreads, with little opportunity of recovering.

Re: another subject...I sure hope "you know who" doesn't turn out to be like the other "you know who," if you get my drift.

Julie


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Taking pics now and comparing to later in the season is fun, and interesting. I'm always amazed at how much things grow from March to October, but mainly from June onward.

I'm interested to see some of your pics. If you post them on another forum, let me know so I can see them too. Thanks.

Re: another subject...I sure hope "you know who" doesn't turn out to be like the other "you know who," if you get my drift.

Funny...I was thinking the exact SAME thing today...and you know what I think of the "other you know who".

No worries though, I think all has been resolved.

Kt


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As much as I love Hostas, I haven't posted on the Hosta forum in a long time. (Life gets in the way.) That's where I would post pics if I were to share them, but like I've said earlier, my life is so hectic lately, that the only forums I visit much at all are here, the Daylily forum, and once in a while the Wisconsin forum.

So I'll post some of my favorite Hosta pics here in a day or two. I finally loaded the photos to my computer this evening, but it's taking me a long time to label them and edit (crop & auto adjust.)

I'm happy that "other issue" has been resolved.

J.


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RE: Photography Thread III

Posting individual hostas isn't as impressive as showing groups of Hostas. You get a better idea of how different colors patterns, shapes, and sizes compliment/contrast with each other.

So I took some group shots:

This is a rather new planting (just last Fall.)
In two or three years, the three Hostas here will mature to full size, and their leaf tips will be touching and overlapping:
Photobucket

Medium green, dark green, blue-green, yellow-green, I'm forever moving them around to show them off to their fullest:
Photobucket

This photo contains my favorite Hosta (for this year, anyway...it changes from year to year.)
The large Hosta in the middle is called 'Forest Fire', and it's about three feet wide...it will get bigger:
Photobucket

More:
Photobucket

And more...
Photobucket

Julie


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RE: Photography Thread III

Very nice, Jule!!

The pics are excellent, and the hostas are beautiful! I can see why people love them sooo much.

Forest Fire...three feet wide!?!? Never knew they got that big. I did wonder though when that pic a while back was posted and that little dog was dwarfed by the size of that hosta.

I've only seen small ones here...and they are few and far between.

I see your Jap Painted Fern next to FF. Mine never grew back...strange. I really liked it but can't figure what happened to it.

Do you grow any of the purplish or blue hostas?

It would be interesting to see a pic taken from the exact same spot at the end of the Summer for comparison.

Thanks for posting those!

Kt


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Thanks for your kind comments, Kt.

Yes, I do grow a few "bluish" Hostas.
I'll get them posted soon.

Three feet wide at maturity is only a medium sized Hosta.
The largest plants get to be five feet or more in diameter.
My largest is 'Blue Mammoth' at five feet. I'll make sure to post that one.

Yes, the end of Summer/early Fall coloring on some of the Hostas changes dramatically. Some turn from green to gold and put on a nice display. They all flower, but some put on a skimpy show, others have scapes that are too tall, so I cut them off as soon as I can. Others put up lots of scapes just above the foliage and put on a spectacular display. I especially like the purple flowered ones.

That's another assignment for me, that I've never done...Photograph each one as it flowers.

So sad about your Japanese Painted Fern disappearing. They are magnificant companions to Hostas.

Later...

Julie


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O.K. You asked for it.

Blue Hostas come in as many shades/hues as green Hostas.
Actually, all the bluish Hostas have some varying amounts of green in them.

Again, if I would post the blue Hostas by themselves, they wouldn't seem very blue at all.
So, I'll post some in groups where you can see contrasting leaf colors, which will bring out the blue colors.

I went out this evening and snapped a whole bunch in "flash off" mode, so the colors aren't washed out, as with a flash. The only problem is that some didn't turn out as clear...well, you'll see...

The blue Hosta in this photo is called 'Love Pat'. It's one of the first Hostas I ever planted, and was once twice the size, about 24" across, but I divided it, because I wanted a blue accent somewhere else:
Photobucket

The blue one in the lower right corner of this pic is called 'Halycon' and is a slow grower. You can see the Hosta on its left is crowding it out...will have to move it next year, I guess:
Photobucket

Apparantly, in the 'No flash' mode, the camera can't focus on a large scene like the following landscape. I prob'ly should have switched to landscape mode, and used 'cloudy/overcast' white balance...so much to learn!
Anyway, the large bluish Hosta on the right is called 'Blue Mammoth' and is about 5 feet across. Visitors always marvel at this one:
Photobucket

In the foreground of the following photo is my "last year's" favorite Hosta, 'June' which has bluish edges. You can also see a bluer Hosta in the background:
Photobucket

This next photo looks "messy" because the daffodil foliage hasn't died back yet, so you have to imagine what the scene looks like without all the extra thin leaves sticking up & every-which-way. The Hosta on the left, 'Blue Angel', will get much wider and taller! Do you see the yellow trillium on the right?
Photobucket

'First Frost' in the middle of this photo is a real knock out! The picture doesn't even do it justice. I purposely surrounded it with more green Hostas to show off the blue:
Photobucket
Here's another one of my favorites - 'Northern Exposure', the largest one in the foreground, not quite as blue as some of the others, but having a cream edge really sets this one off. Right behind it, you see a vase-shaped hosta, actually much bigger than the picture shows:
Photobucket

I have oodles more, but I think I've given you an idea of some of the 'blues' that I grow.

Julie


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Very Nice, Jule!!

I really like Blue Mammoth. Even in that pic, it's hard to imagine it's size.

You certainly have quite a collection there. I also like the vase-shaped hosta, however, they all are beautiful. I have the same passion for bamboo.

Thanks for posting all those pics. Dare I ask...any more??

Kt


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Thanks, Kt!

I have the same passion for bamboo.
If your passion for bamboo is as strong as my passion for hostas, then I can imagine you love viewing your collections, watching their growth patterns throughout the growing season. And of course you surely love caring for them.

I find myself gradually getting rid of certain plants that don't perform well, or that I'm bored with, and replacing them with hostas (if in shade/part shade), or daylilies (if in sun/part sun.)

I will try to post a few more unusual hostas, once I catch my breath...busy time of year here.

Glad you enjoyed the short tour.

Hey, sometime, (if you have time,) how 'bout posting some of your favorite plants...let me guess...bamboos?

Julie


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More Hostas...

Pointed leaves, a very commanding plant:
Photobucket

Another huge one (5')that glows in the shade:
Photobucket

"serrated" (sort of) edges:
Photobucket

wavy leaves:
Photobucket

You'd have to see this one in person to appreciate the various colors running into each other:
Photobucket

Another bluish hued:
Photobucket

On of the few Hostas that can take full sun:
Photobucket

Bad photo of this one (flash washed out the color.)
The green is actually much darker, which brings out the "T-bolt" with more contrast:
Photobucket

Enough already!

Your turn, please...

Julie


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RE: Photography Thread III

Wow! Too bad I can't grow them here...

I may have to try again next year, and get a couple of the best ones suited for this climate and see what happens...like I have time for more plants.

Thanks for posting those! I keep looking at them over and over...and your picture quality is superb. Suitable for a magazine.

Kt


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RE: Photography Thread III

Thanks, Kt,

Suitable for a magazine.
Goodness, no one has ever given me that kind of compliment before! I have always felt more comfortable shooting close-ups than landscapes & sunsets. I should be able to start experimenting with my camera more this summer when I'm off work for a while.

I'm also waiting for our temps to warm up around here. The weatherman said our average temps should be 75 daytime temps, but we've only hit the mid 60's lately....with cold rainstorms...bummer. I'm anxious to get out at night and try some moon shots again.

What have you been "shooting" lately?

Julie


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What have you been "shooting" lately?

Tried to get some pics from my yard that you requested, but lighting is always bad...too late in the day.

I take regular sunset/sunrises and a lot of moonshots lately with the passing full moon...nothing spectacular. Garden plants include bamboo close-ups, a blooming daylily, a bloom of an althea(?), some canna blooms, some unidentified animal tracks in the sand, an anole on an A/C unit taken while waiting in line at the drivethru at Whataburger, & St, Mary's Church at Hostyn. I tried to get some more of the red head pecker in my wine tree but he flew away too quickly.

I have some more that I need to download soon.

I take between 20 and 200 pics a week, depending on how much time I have for photography, but I'm back to watering now and it is taking up a lot of my otherwise spare time, but, I am staying ahead of the drought so far this year.

Kt


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RE: Photography Thread III

Another drought? Or should I say STILL the drought situation from last year?

Well, you certainly are dedicated when it comes to keeping your plants thriving!

When you get a break from watering, please share some pics of your plants, or landscapes/sunsets/moon shots if you have the time.

Julie


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RE: Photography Thread III

Another drought?

Well, we were getting rain, but each rain was less and less and now it has shut off completely. Hauled some hay today...only 17 roundbales. In a normal year, we should get around 100 to 120 bales each cutting, and in a great year cutting, upwards of 200 bales.

When you get a break from watering, please share some pics...

Will do. I just haven't sat down long enough to upload them and post them.

Mine aren't near as pretty as yours, and my yard is nothing as beautiful as yours, so I try to get individual pics of plants which is difficult because everything is planted very close together.

As I mentioned before, my yard is just one big experiment. I grow things more for learning than for aesthetics, at least here at my house.

I don't have time to make it look really nice since I have soo many plants....someday though, I will take more time for that.

Kt


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...17 roundbales...
Those are huge! You must have a special machine to haul them? I see more of them around here than the rectangular bales. The only places I see the rectangular bales are around pumpkin farms, where they use them for display.

...my yard is nothing as beautiful as yours...
Well, thanks, but there are areas of my yard that need much improvement, that would not be fit for a "garden tour/walk." I have experimental areas too, where I'm constantly moving plants around for various reasons...not enough sun, too much sun, poor soil, soil TOO rich (producing abundant foliage, but not enough bloom), aggressive/invasive plants, too tall or too short for such-and-such location, poor performers get thrown out, giving away plants I no longer enjoy, the list goes on and on...

I only have one garden for showing off, and that's the one on the north side of the driveway as people near the house. I have several of each kind of shrub/plant, which holds the garden together. There is something blooming every month of the growing season.

...my yard is just one big experiment. I grow things more for learning than for aesthetics, at least here at my house...
That's the fun of gardening! You can do whatever you want in your own yard! I have one garden that is completely daylily seedlings...certainly not a landscaper's choice of good design. It looks like a huge patch of arching grass when not in bloom! But I don't mind, because it's MY experiment.

When I retire, I want to start growing more things in large pots that I can set on the South side of my house where I can monitor them closely. Right now, nothing is planted there, because the previous owners fenced in a large area for a dog pen, with gravel. We topped the gravel with landscape fabric and wood chips, and I have lots of vines growing on the chain link fence, to soften the look, but it's still not complete...much more area to plant with Clematis and other flowering vines. Potted plants placed among the vines would also look nice, I think. Hmmmmmm....more dreaming to do during the winter months.

Then there's the West side of the house that is an on-going experiment. Poor soil doesn't help! Heavy tan clay is what I find whenever I plant something new near the foundation. I need to amend the soil and plant things that don't mind having dry feet, as the soil doesn't hold moisture well there, because of the "rain shadow." I need to plant some taller shrubs to hide the electric meter (but still leave access for the meter reader), and it would be nice to hide the AC unit (but leaving enough space for blowing hot air). All I have planted on that side of the house are low growing perennials, which would look great if my house were Ranch-style, but being a two story house, it needs some shrubs with height.

Hiring landscapers to do garden work is fine for some people who are either too busy to do the work themselves, or don't care for getting their hands in the dirt. They can have a beautiful manicured lawn, perfectly trimmed shrubs & trees, with splashes of blooming annuals in planters and hanging baskets, and all that to please themselves and the rest of the neighborhood.

But that's not for me. I'd rather do the work myself, and have garden areas where I can "play."

I can fully appreciate your desire to experiment with all your plants.
That's the fun of learning/gardening....ENJOY!!!;)))

Goodness, I sure am rambling...

'Sposed to be 74 this aft! Going out to plant a shipment of Hostas and Daylilies:)))))))

Julie


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Not sure where Photography thread two went.

J


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RE: Photography Thread III

Cleaning house/re-arranging things, huh, Kt.

I'm feeling guilty now, not practicing my photography techniques like I promised myself I would do when I retire.

Been snapping lots of photos on "auto", though, so my camera certainly isn't getting dusty. If I think of it, I'll show a few photos of my quilting projects, (not that you or anyone else would be interested in quilting,) but just to show another addiction of mine.

Julie


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RE: Photography Thread III

Many of my aunts and other relatives used to knit and crotchet. I think that any type of quilting projects are interesting and say a lot about a person. It takes commitment and dedication.

I would enjoy seeing some of your quilting projects!

Kt


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RE: Photography Thread III

Many people create quilts with themes and each quilt is to be named and signed & dated by the quilter. My goal is to make each grandchild a quilt, starting with the oldest. I will only make one each year for a Christmas present.

Here's my oldest granddaughter's, with her choice of colors:
Jaylyn's Quilt
The pattern is called "A Trip Around The World".
It only took me 61 hours to make (spread out in the space of a month.)

Since she plays the flute, I incorporated fabrics with music symbols:
(Click for a larger image)
Musical rectangles

This next project is for Christmas, and the picture doesn't do it justice, because the fancy machine stitching can't be seen well. I made it for the Racine Garden Club (which I joined a few months ago.) We had our December meeting last night, including a Silent Auction. My table runner was bid on a few times and the highest bidder (and winner) was tickled she won it for only $25. She said it would have been worth $40 in any store. (The back, which you can't see, is filled with fancy red stitching, too.)
Table runner
Proceeds from the auction items go the the Salvation Army, except for $50 which will go to a boy at a local church. He has Leukemia and is on his last chance of life with experimental drugs.

I could talk for hours about quilting, but not here.

Julie


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Wow, how beautiful!

Thanks for that close-up of the top quilt with the music symbols. Very nice idea!

Each year at our church picnic, women donate quilts that they make during the previous year. Sometimes they sell for a few thousand dollars(several people join together for one bid).

At almost every fundraiser you can find a handmade quilt. There are a lot of talented people out there, including you.

Kt


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RE: Photography Thread III

Thanks, Kt.

Yes, I can certainly believe some quilts can sell for a few thousand dollars, especially considering the amount of labor involved. I've seen beautiful Amish quilts online that sell for thousands of $$$

I'm just a beginning quilter, and still have a lot to learn. I don't plan on entering any quilt shows, I just want to have fun, even if I break the rules once in a while. Friends tell me the "Quilt Police" will never come after me.

During the last two months I've made two quilts, (one for Jaylyn and a smaller lap quilt for my Mom,) five pillows, one wall hanging, two table runners, (and I'm presently working on another for my own dining room table for Christmas,) and if I still have time I'd like to make a pillow for my neighbor, since she gives me so many veggies from her garden.

Like gardening, quilting is fun, relaxing, and therapeutic (that spelling doesn't look right.)

Some women make quilting rooms in spare bedrooms, but I don't have that luxury. My sewing room doubles with an office/library area. A friend of mine uses half her basement as a design/quilting area. I've come across a couple of men online that quilt. My cousin knows of a retired Engineer that professionally quilts customers' pieced projects on a huge longarm machine, and makes good money providing that service.

Hope my eyes hold out for many more years...there's a lot of strain focusing on those tiny stitches.

Thanks again for your comments!

Julie


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RE: Photography Thread III

I will soon try to remember to post my latest quilt....full of wheels galore!

J


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RE: Photography Thread III

Thanks for bumping up this thread!

I like looking at the pics and re-reading the posts.

Kt


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