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Bamboo Thread Four

Posted by luvtosharedivs 5a WI (My Page) on
Tue, Jun 16, 09 at 18:27

On my way home from work today, I stopped at a local reputable garden center/nursery to browse through the shrub area. There was a small display of Bamboo, so I took a closer look, and there were two kinds...a ground cover type that didn't interest me, and Fargesia rufa...not 'Green Panda', just rufa.

To me, rufa looks just like Panda, so I read the tag, and thought...should I, or shouldn't I? Hmmmmmmm. I examined the plants, and found the healthiest, with the most green leaves, and the most culms. Goodness, there were so many of them bunched together, I couldn't count them!

For some strange reason, rufa ended up riding home with me.
Well, not really strange. I gave it some good thought. If I would have ordered 'Green Panda' again from the same vendor as last year, it would have cost much more, with the $20+ shipping cost. So, I decided to try rufa, which can take even colder temps(-20) than 'Panda'(-15).

Oh, and BTW, I have lost more expensive plants than 'Panda'. I think the most expensive loss was a 'Showy Mountain Ash" tree, which I paid around $80 for, and it only lasted 6 months. So, don't feel bad about recommending bamboo varieties to me.

Well, here it is, Fargesia rufa:
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And closer, just look at those culms! And you prob'ly can't see in the photo, but there are more shoots emerging!:
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I experimented by setting the pot in different locations to get an idea how it might look. The "most protected" location would be on the South side of the garage in the raised bed (excellent drainage.) It would get a couple of hours of direct sun, then dabbled shade for the rest of the day. The only problem here, is that it doesn't have room to spread. If it grows as fast as I read in my research, it would soon be brushing us in the face every time we enter the garage service door...
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I did more research and found that rufa can tolerate sun for part of the day, so I set the pot in my "Screen bed" (so-called, because some day I hope to screen the view of the parking slab.) You can see the pot sitting in the middle, where another shrub is struggling to make a come-back after almost being killed by our horrendous winter:
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In my research, I read that rufa can handle windy locations, so I thought of one more place near the southeast corner of our house. The area between the house and garage can sometimes be a wind tunnel. That corner only receives a small amount of direct morning sun, then mostly shade/dappled shade for the rest of the day. The area you see in the picture would show off rufa quite well, since no other plants are nearby, except the Clematis. If rufa were planted there, it would hide the black section of the downspout behind it:
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So many decisions...

Here's a question for you...
Would I be able to divide rufa in half, or maybe even into three separate plants while it's in this "shooting" stage, or would that harm the plant? I'd like to try growing it in two, if not three different locations.

Thanks ahead of time for listening to "Motor Mouth" here, and I'd appreciate any advice you could give.

Julie


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Looks like Taffy(?) got tired of watching you walk around with that pot of bamboo, and decided to take a nap.

Dividing during while it's shooting will set it back, but not kill it. The new shoots will probably die ans will some of the older culms, which is normal.

I divide at any time of the year that 'I' have time to, but I would wait till later in the year, but then it will be too late to put the plant in the ground, as it needs time to grow before Winter.

It's a very nice looking plant, and if I were you, and living here as I do, I would divide it in half now(not any more divisions than that), then keep one in a pot and put one in the ground.

Need to go for now. I'll respond more later.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Taffy is always sad when she's inside the gate, and I'm outside the gate having more fun than she is. I had to keep her in, because shortly after I took photos, we had to take a trip to the vet to get vaccinated for kennel cough.

Thanks for your input on rufa.
I understand about not dividing while it's shooting, but I also understand that if I wait too long, it won't have time to establish itself before the ground freezes.

Around here, the general rule is to plant a perennial about 6 weeks before the average first frost date, and it will have enough time to establish itself for the winter. That would mean I could plant it as late as the end of August. By that time, the new shooting culms would have had enough time to grow, I would think. Trouble is, late August is often very hot and dry around here.

However, I think it would be better if I would go with what you suggested and divide now, taking the loss of a few culms, and letting it suffer a setback. Because right now, the ground is very moist from ample rains, plus an extra two months of growing would certainly help it establish itself better than if I would wait till August.

Will have to take another walk around the property, and see if there are any other possible locations. Now, to keep half the plant in a pot will be fun, because I can move it around for "accents" in various places. But come Fall, I guess I'd have to bring it in the house, because to leave it outside in a potted stage would mean certain death! No perennials (here) can survive the winter sitting in a container...not even daylilies. The temperature above ground is colder than below ground , and also, there is the danger of alternating freeze-thaw conditions, that could heave a plant right out of its pot!

I'll keep you posted on where I plant half of rufa.

Now, Re: Panda...
I was transplanting some daylilies in my "Panda" bed, looking at the dried culms of Panda, and couldn't stand the suspense any longer. So, I lifted the chicken wire cage, and gently scraped all the mulch away (about 4" worth) from the crown. There was still a little soil above the rhizomes, and I didn't want to scrape any further, but I could see a whole bunch of light colored (creamy) roots reaching out from the crown of the plant. And I know very well that those roots were not attached to grass, weeds, tree roots, or anything else that might be growing nearby. Now, in all my growing experience, I know that white or near-white roots mean that a plant is alive!
Do you think there is still hope?

I covered the crown with just 1" of wood chips, and placed the cage around Panda again...didn't have to water, like I said, we've had ample rain.

I guess I keep waiting, huh?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Yes, definitely keep waiting. I have seen severe stress that can make bamboos here not do a thing until well into the growing season, and some boos won't grow unless the temps stay above 60F at night, so...

Fargesias are kind of rare here mainly because they can't stand the high Summer heat, but even here, some of those that I had didn't put up shoots until about this time of the year or even a bit later, but mine weren't topkilled, but with bamboo stranger things have happened.

Keeping my fingers crossed.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

This year has definitely been a stress on a lot of my plants. Many that are in flower right now are blooming on short plants, because of the looooooonnnnggg wet, cool Spring.

I had started looking in my garden books for a shrub that could take the place of Panda, in case it was dead, but now I have renewed hope that it may still pull through.

I will keep you posted with any news, whether good or bad.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Thanks, and I'm still hoping for the best.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Here is a link that might be useful: Click Here


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Well, that's very encouraging reading!

Panda still isn't doing anything, but I keep watering it. If it doesn't do anything in the next week or so, I may just dig it up - I know, disturbing it isn't good, but I really want to examine the roots. If they're still white, I want to plant it in a pot and keep it near the house where I can watch it closely and maybe nurse it into growing. (Do you think that would be O.K.....or should I STILL wait longer?) Decisions....decisions!

'Rufa' is still sitting happily in its pot until I can get around to dividing it. I have two possible spots picked out, and I will keep half of it in a pot,( prob'ly upsize the pot.)

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

I think that would be OK. Something should have happened by now.

Good Luck.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Something should have happened by now.
My thoughts exactly. It's a good thing I have had losses in the past. It has sort of conditioned me to take losses without "going to pieces". Our harsh climate can be nasty, especially with the West winds we get most of the time. I know I have little micro climates around the property where certain plants will survive better than others.

On particularly windy days, I can walk into the East woods, which slopes down from the house, and the air can be calm making for a peaceful environment. Then just when you think you're safe from prevailing winds, the air currents can shift, and those Easterlies can be just as brutal.

I'll keep you posted on Panda's fate.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Thanks. I'm still hoping for the best...and stranger things have happened with my bamboo(and other plants) before.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Continuing the mysterious Panda saga...

Today I decided to dig up Panda and determine whether to compost it, or pot it up.

I first trimmed off the browned culms, leaving 5" on the plant. I know you told me not to cut it back, but I figured it would be easier to handle without all those culms sticking up in my face. There's no life left in them anyway. I was surprised how strong the culms were, even as thin as they are. I couldn't snap them! They are now displayed in a metal vase sitting on my enclosed front porch for decoration.

On the top of the root ball (I s'pose that's not the correct terminology, but I don't know what else to call it,) the fine "hair" roots had dried out and turned brown. But a few inches down they were creamy colored. Just for kicks, I took a pruner and cut through a couple of the thick roots (rhizomes?) and saw that they were white. I then scraped my thumb across the cut sections, and water oozed out. So, it appears that water is being drawn up by the roots, and being stored.

I decided not to compost Panda yet, seeing as the rhizomes had not rotted or dried up. It's in a large clay pot sitting next to the house in a shady spot, hopefully being influenced by rufa, sitting in a pot next to it. I only wish I had a plastic pot, as they don't dry out as quickly as clay pots do. I added a layer of wood chips to the top of the pot, to help keep some moisture in. Now it's wait and see.

Since Panda is no longer in my "Panda Bed", I had to rename the garden. There was a struggling rose shrub growing in my South lawn, where the soil is quite dry, and I can't always remember to walk all the way down there to water it. So, I dug that up, which was very easy, because it had only grown a foot high. I then transplanted it to replace Panda, so now the bed is renamed "Rugosa Garden."

Question:
Where do new shoots/culms emerge from - the ends/edges of rhizomes, or from in between them?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Where do new shoots/culms emerge from - the ends/edges of rhizomes, or from in between them?

I guess I can answer my own question.

Did some research, and found out that new shoots emerge from the ends of rhizome axes.

Also learned that bamboo requires sandy loam or loamy clay, and they will not tolerate waterlogged conditions. That may explain why Panda showed now growth (shoot-wise) this Spring/early Summer. We had very heavy rainfalls, and many lawn areas were saturated for long periods of time. Poor Panda must've nearly drowned.

Also learned that caring for potted bamboo requires more work than those planted in the ground. A raised bed should be perfect.

Just talking to myself, I guess....

j


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Question:
Where do new shoots/culms emerge from - the ends/edges of rhizomes, or from in between them?

Answer:
On a clumper they come from the ends of the very short rhizomes. I have a pic saved somewhere that I'll post once I find it. I'm having computer problems here so things are slow. All new shoots emerge at nodes in the rhizomes.

Some bamboo does tolerate extremely wet conditions. Some bamboo stores water 'in' it's rhizomes. I have heard of bamboo that grows in water for months at a time, and even potted bamboos being submerged in water ponds.

I have one large potted bamboo that I cannot keep watered enough with this dry spell we are going through, so I keep it in a larger pot filled with water. The potted bamboo is submerged about half way up(down) the potted boo. It's been that way since Spring with no ill effects at all.

Sorry for the late reply. Computer acted up last night so I spent the evening making backups of all my pics. Also I don't get in till 9pm each night. Watering is about all I do after work. Sold 26 more cows, one bull, and 14 calves last weekend. I heard the cattle auction went on til after 3am in the morning, that's how many cattle were there. Everyone is selling out...including us. I am already feeding hay, but only have enough for about 21 more days. Even with rain, I don't think the hayfields can recover enough to get a cutting of hay off them before cool weather sets in.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Oh goodness, so sorry to hear you're having computer problems. I can understand backing up photos is of top priority.

The reason I asked where shoots emerge from is because of something I observed when I examined the roots and rhizones when I dug Panda out of the ground. Now this is very hard for me to describe, but on the ends of some of the rhizomes, I saw what looked like an opening of some sort. The best comparison I can come up with is what's left at the top of a stem after you pick a raspberry or blackberry.

That puzzled me, because I wonder if some shoots had started to emerge there, then died away. But I couldn't see anything that looked like decayed/rotted material attached to those ends.

You must be exhausted every night after doing all that watering in the high heat & humidity y'all are experiencing.

Sad to hear about your cattle sales. Who buys the cattle? Ranchers in other states or in Texas where the drought hasn't affected them? Or are the grown cows & bulls sold for meat and sent off to the slaughter house?

Julie, who is ignorant about cattle stuff.

P.S. Thanks for your response.


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Not sure what you are seeing, but the plant is most likely dead. However, as I mentioned before, I thought I had lost some plants, then potted them up in new well-drained soil, and shazaam!...they come back to life. Still hope I guess, but slim.

Most of the cattle are shipping to Florida, and a few other areas where they have had rain and plenty of grass...others go to slaughter.

A chance of rain this weekend, but if none comes, I will be selling more next weekend.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

O.K., I'll hope for SHAZAAM then!

Otherwise, I'll chalk up the loss as weather related - brutal Winter temps followed by saturating/flooding Spring rains.

Meantime, I now have rufa to focus on, which looks the same as Panda to me, except shorter (at this point), but a lot bushier.

It's hard to imagine Floridians raising cattle. But if that where the grass is, so be it.
Sorry to hear you may have to sell more cattle, but I understand that's what you have to do, if you can't feed and water them. Maybe some day you can build up your herd again.

...all things work together for good to them that love God...

Forgive me for quoting part of a Bible verse, but I just wanted to send some hope your way. You know how certain circumstances in life remind you of a song? Well certain circumstances in life sometimes bring a Bible verse to my mind. Don't worry, I'm not going to toss out verses left and right. But in your circumstance, which has gone on for a couple of years now, with little relief in sight, the situation seems grim.

You may not see the "good" out of this for years to come, but there's a reason.

And I'd better shut up now before I sound like I'm preaching.

Just hang in there;)

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Thanks, and I agree with the verse and that things in life remind me of songs,...and yes, verses in the Bible.

I waited a while today before watering because there was thundering and heavy clouds in the south. They were getting closer, but soon began to fizzle out and they moved more east.

It was like being lost at sea for months, after having your ship sunk, and finally seeing a ship in the distance. You have a whole new outlook on things, renewed hope and get a sudden burst of energy...then the ship sails away, never seeing you.


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

I decided it was time to divide rufa, and plant the two divisions in two different locations.

Cutting it in half was quite a chore, since the crown was very tough, and the plant was pot-bound, with roots circling around the inside of the pot. Rufa is proving to be more vigorous than Panda was. Ever since I brought rufa home it has been sending up shoots nonstop! Today I noticed newer shoots (culms) that had emerged just inside the rim of the pot, and they had grown as tall as the original ones. So, this plant now has prob'ly doubled the number of culms since I purchased it! If you look at the first picture I posted on this thread, imagine the plant twice as wide, but not much taller. And at the base there are still new baby shoots emerging!!!!

I realize the brutal cutting will prob'ly stop the newer culms from growing, and some of the older ones will surely die, but I have so many left, it doesn't matter!

I decided not to keep one in a pot over winter, because a potted plant would be harder to take care of since I don't have a greenhouse. One spot I chose which I call a 'micro climate' is in the raised bed behind my garage, facing South. It is well protected from most winds, and the raised bed provides perfect drainage. The third picture above shows my garage bed, but I didn't plant rufa where the pot is sitting in that picture, because it won't have room to spread there. I planted it a few feet from the other side of the Clematis, and I'll be moving a couple of other perennials to give it some growing room. It will get morning sun and afternoon shade. I think this is the best protected location on my property.

The other location is next to the house, as in photo #5 above. Not as well protected there, since it sometimes gets windy between the house and garage, but it's still protected from cold west winter winds. An added plus is that it should get adequate snow cover for insulation, since that's where we shovel the snow from the sidewalk. It will get some morning sun, but mostly shade for the rest of the day. I raked away the decorative rocks, cut away the landscape fabric, amended the soil, mounded up the soil (for better drainage), set the other half of rufa in place, watered, and covered the mound of soil with rocks again.

So there you have it...Fargesia rufa is settled in and will have a good two months to establish itself before frost sets in. I think this cultivar will prove to be tougher than poor Panda was, judging by the growth it has produced since I brought it home!

I will soon give Panda a proper burial in my compost pile very soon, since it has shown no sign of coming to life.

I don't think I will give rufa any special covering this winter like I did with Panda. I think a few inches of mulch will do, especially since both divisions are planted near the house and I can monitor them closely. A short (12") chikenwire cage filled with 5-6" of wood chips should be sufficient....I hope!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

I may have asked before...but do I see a bamboo windchime?

I think the locations are great, but again, planting a borderline cold-hardy plant, at this time of the year, even here where we may have 3 to 4 more months of growing, is questionable.

I prefer giving the plant a full growing season in the ground for best results.

However, you are a better judge of growing things in your area, which is different than the growing season way down here, and since the ground freezes hard anyway, a full growing season might not make a difference.

Panda, if given more time in a pot, may have shown signs of vigorous growth also. In ideal conditions, the plants will flourish, but sometimes it takes a while to establish itself and begin growing.

I agree with just giving them a good mulching and letting nature take it's course. You sure went through a lot of work/loving care to see that the Rufa has it's best shot at making the Winter.

Good Luck.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Yes, you see a bamboo wind chime in the last photo. I got that one on sale 50% off at Shopko, I think. I also have a larger one that is in pieces in the basement. The bamboo sections are fine, but it's the cord that held them all together that broke apart. It's added to my TO DO list.

You completely lost me Kt, in your explanation above. Do you mean to say you would plant a bamboo in the ground and leave it there one full year before dividing it?

I'm sure Rufa will go through a transplanting shock, but as vigorous as it is, I'm hopeful that it will establish itself before the ground freezes.

I was transfering the info from the tag that came with it to my journal, and noticed its life cycle is 60 years, (plus or minus.) What on Earth does that mean?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Forgot to mention about "best times for dividing".
The general rule for dividing perennials (around here, anyway) is to divide Spring/late Summer bloomers in the Fall, and divide late Summer/Fall bloomers in the Spring. However, there are some perennials that can be divided any time of year with no adverse effect, like daylilies or hostas for example.

Since bamboo is not a perennial, but a grass, I don't know the best time to divide...just my luck it's prob'ly Spring.

....a few minutes later....

I just watched a video about dividing a bamboo, and He said normally he would divide a plant while it's "shooting," but for the sake of showing the dividing process in the video, he DID divide it while shooting, so I guess that won't kill the plant. I do remember you telling me you normally don't divide while it's shooting.

One thing I DID do right was to cut off all the roots from the bottom, just like he did in the video. I do that to all perennials I buy in nursery pots if they're pot-bound. I also made sure it was watered well before dividing, again just like the video showed.

So.......we shall see...another experiment.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

You're more experienced than I am with dividing and transplanting in your area.

Divding during shooting will not necessarily kill a bamboo, but it seems to set it back more. I have divided and transplanted bamboo at all times of the year with success.

A borderline cold hardy bamboo, I will always give a full growing season in the ground before Winter sets in.

Do you mean to say you would plant a bamboo in the ground and leave it there one full year before dividing it?

No. Your Rufa was definitley ready to divide. I just don't know how much it will establish itself before Winter.

...life cycle is 60 years...

Some bamboo goes to seed every 20 years, some every 40, 60, or 120 years, etc. cycles. Some bamboo has never been known to seed.

Once bamboo seeds, the plant dies, at least that is the common thought. However, bamboo that starts seeding can be heavily fertilized and trimmed back and saved from dying. Same species of bamboo will go to seed all over the world at the same time.

On a similar note, I have a P. japonica here that has been blooming and seeding since I bought it about 8 years ago, so go figure.

So, I guess everything that you hear about bamboo is not necessarily true for all parts of the world.

Confused yet?

One thing I DID do right was to cut off all the roots from the bottom...

That is one thing that I NEVER do. Those roots have to grow back before the plant can start establishing itself.

I've seen countless people and so-called experts who say to cut off the roots, or slice the rootbound plant to get the roots to grow, but all this does is damage the plant giving it more to recover from and allowing wounds for disease to enter.

If there are too many roots, the ones not used will die 'naturally' and new ones will grow where needed. Cut roots have to 'heal' and re-grow which sets the plant back further.

Try an experimant sometime with two similar plants. Put one in the ground straight from the pot, and cut off and scarify the roots on the other. You'll see the difference almost immediately...within a few days. You be the judge.

I'll watch the video later, and get back with you.

My number one rule for planting is..."Don't make too much of a science out of it." That's part of the fun of gardening/growing things. You learn by trial and error.

So having said all of this and totally confusing you, see what happens. Two months may be more than enough in your area and for that type of bamboo. Here, I like 6 to 8 months for a plant to establish, but then we are talking about different species of plants.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

First of all, thanks for taking the time to respond.
This bamboo stuff is still in the experimental stage for me.

I think I have a better cultivar to work with this time.

I see I misquoted something in my post Fri @ 0:29 (actually 11:29 my time.) Re: the guy in the video, I said, "He said normally he would divide a plant while it's shooting," but what I meant to say was, "He said normally he WOULDN'T divide a plant while it's shooting." (Bad proofreading!)

Same species of bamboo will go to seed all over the world at the same time.
I remember reading that somewhere. So if one species dies completely out, do the seeds come true to the parent?

You are the first person that I've heard say that you never cut roots off from the bottom. I do that all the time to annuals and perennials if they're pot bound because it's what I've read or been told what to do. I've always thought this practice stimulates new growth in the root system. Your explanation of the old roots dying on their own makes sense though. I'll try and remember that next time I plant a pot bound plant.

The reason I waited a few weeks before cutting Rufa in half is that you told me dividing it right away would set it back and that I should wait until later in the year. I though this would be the best time, since I have a good two months before our average first frost date for our zone 5.

After reading and researching Rufa, I see the absolute best time for dividing is in the Spring before it starts to shoot, but I couldn't do that, so I took the chance now.

I also noticed that Rufa is hardy in zones 5-7, so there prob'ly wouldn't be a chance for us to trade, since Rufa would prob'ly die in your heat. If I am successful with this one, maybe I'll try something in a runner - (yikes!)

I like your number one rule:
"Don't make too much of a science out of it."
What works for one person may not work for the next person...too many variables - climate, soil, sunlight, location, water, nutrients, etc. Heck, even on my own property there are different micro climates, soil, sunlight, etc. and same types of plants behave differently in these different areas! I've had to move many plants because of unfavorable conditions or competition from trees or other plants.

After I retire I plan on joining a garden club in Racine where I'll meet other gardeners and hopefully I'll meet someone who grows bamboo here!

Thanks again for taking the time to give suggestions;)

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

You're more than welcome...I just hope I'm helping and not confusing you:)

I see I misquoted something....(Bad proofreading!)

Yes, I understood what you meant, no problem.

So if one species dies completely out, do the seeds come true to the parent?

Not always, which is why seeding is not necessarily a bad thing, and why seeds are so much in demand. Everyone wants a 'new' cultivar.

Sometimes variegated bamboos come from seed or even more cold hardy bamboos than their mother plant.

One poster on the bamboo forum a while back said he planted several dozen Moso seeds. After reaching some size, he then left them out on consecutively colder nights until only a few were left...supposedly more cold hardy than those that froze, but I still think there might have been some other factors involved.

A good example are the Bambusa multiplexes. There are several subspecies such as B.m. Al Karr etc. One of the first bamboos that I ever purchased was an Al Karr, which had green shoots coming up among the normal yellow striped ones.

I eventually realized they were B.m. Goldstripe. What happened was, the nursery had started the plants from seeds(all from one plant), planting several in a pot...and one seed apparently came up as a different sub-specie or variety. Did that make sense?

I had a Fargesia murieliae and a F. nitida, but the drought got the last one at the beginning of last Spring. Too hot and too dry. They can survive here, but always look ratty.

There's a lot of people who grow bamboo in your zone, and well into Canada, but what they go through to Winterize it...I don't know.

I tend to think you will be fine with Rufa, and leaving it uncovered may be the best thing. I'm already interested to see the results!

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Well, starting bamboo from seed would have to be exciting, especially if some don't come true to the parent. A sub-specie/variety would be a nice surprise!

About Rufa, I'd rather treat it like most of my other perennials around here. They are either left alone (bare to the elements) or covered with a minimal 3-4-5" of mulch if newly planted that particular year. If I have to go through a heavy covering, then it's just not worth it to me to keep and care for that kind of plant. Easy maintenance is what I go for, especially with the huge number of plants I now have.

One of these days I'll try and count all the perennials, bulbs, shrubs, and trees I have growing around here. They're all listed, but I've never totaled them up.

Anyway, I'll keep you posted on Rufa's progress.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

How deep does the ground freeze there?

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

How deep does the ground freeze there?
Good question!
I don't know for sure, but I think it depends on the type of winter we have. Usually there is a typical "January Thaw" where a lot of the snow cover melts, and we have puddles and mud for a while, followed by a heavy freeze again. But that doesn't mean total thawing of the ground deep down, but rather just thawing of the top few inches of soil. That's why people mulch certain perennials AFTER the ground first freezes, in order to keep it frozen during those temporary freeze-thaw-freeze-thaw cycles. Otherwise (if not mulched) certain shallow rooted perennials can heave right out of the ground. That's never happend to me though.

Didn't answer your question, did I?
I will try and find out this winter, and let you know. I do remember a few winters back, some of the local people here were talking about the ground being frozen down to six feet, and that was one darn cold winter, with no January thaw!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

I figure it typically freezes 4 feet anyway, right?

Here we bury our water pipes mainly to keep from tripping over them...standard is about 1 foot deep.

In Colorado, some friends have their pipes buried a minimum of 6 feet.

Anyway, I ask because if it freezes 4 feet down, then it shouldn't matter if the plant gets a full year to establish itself, since the rhizomes and roots will be in solid frozen ground either way, so 2 months should give it time to get itself ready for Winter...saving up energy in it's rhizomes for Spring growth.

I only recall the ground freezing here once in this area, and then it only was a few inches at most, and some areas didn't freeze at all.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

I think some of the local farmers may have been exaggerating if they said the ground was frozen 6 feet under. That just seems just too extreme. I googled one source that said Wisconsin's frost line is 42". I also found an interesting map that shows extreme frost penetration across the U.S. (You'll have to scroll down almost to mid-page and click on the thumnail map to view the larger image.)

I guess it all depends on the weather in a particular season, and snow cover. If there is little snow cover, there is a greater depth of freezing. I remember one winter here a few years back when we had a winter drought...saw 1" cracks in the ground all winter. That may have been the winter the locals were saying the ground was frozen 6 feet under.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

As I was driving between work locations today, my route took me through the rich subdivision of Wind Point, an area on the shores of Lake Michigan.

The speed limit there is only 30mph, and I like to view the great landscaping on various properties. I had to take a second look, slowing down my vehicle, when I saw an unfamiliar looking shrub (for our area, anyway.)

Upon closer inspection, I realized it was a Bamboo! Now, I don't know one Bamboo from another, but it looked a lot like Fargesia rufa, or 'Green Panda', as seen on some of the websites I've visited. It was quite a mature specimen, maybe 5 or 6' tall and wide, definitely a well-behaved clump.

What impressed me is that it was growing in a very open, unprotected area. It didn't look like a new planting, but rather established in its location, in someone's front yard, about 20 feet from the roadside.

That's the first Bamboo I've seen in a landscape setting around here. Gives me hope that my rufa may survive. The Village of Wind Point is situated in a northern section of Racine, and it juts out into lake Michigan in sort of a triangle shape. Therefore it's climate is cooler in Summer and warmer in Winter than where I live, about 10 miles away from the lake. They may have a mini-climate of Z5b, just a tad warmer than my Z5a.

Anyway, the leaves glistening in the sun, with gently waving culms was very impressive.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Excellent! I was wondering if you might someday come across a plant somewhere like that.

It was most likely a Fargesia, but it could also be one of a few other mountain bamboos that can survive your zone, but are less common.

Chusqueas, Borindas, & Thamnocalamus' are some of the other cold hardy mountain bamboo possibilities.

I really like the chusqueas, and some of the borindas and thamnocalamus' do very well even down here.

You're hooked! Everywhere I go, and even when I'm not looking...I spot bamboo. I can spot it anywhere, even while watching TV, which isn't very often. Same goes for arrowheads and petrified wood. I spotted a chunk of petrified wood in New Mexico while driving 70mph down the road...and in Colorado hunting one year, I found several arrowheads while I should have been looking for deer or elk....crazy.

Anyway, it would be interesting to know the exact variety.

Keep looking, I bet you'll find more in the area.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Chusqueas, Borindas, & Thamnocalamus'
Can't even imagine how those are pronounced!

I drive through that area about once/week, but seldom see anyone outside except professional landscapers, which are no doubt hired by the rich land owners. I wonder how many property owners actually know something about gardening. Although, I've spotted a couple of older homes where people have obviously been doing serious gardening for many years, with rows of berries, tomatoes, various veggies, and neat rows of cutting flowers.

If I ever see anyone out in the yard with the bamboo, I will surely stop and ask what the variety is.

The leaves had a nice shimmer as the noon sun shone on them.
And no, that doesn't mean I'm hooked...it's just that they have a new and unique look that's rarely seen around here.

If I ever find out the name, I'll let you know.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Take a pic if possible. Also a close-up pic.

Yes, there are some people here who also hire landscapers to do ALL of their work...how unrewarding!

We see a lot of people who move out from the city and have everything done for them. They build a house on 80 acres, just a few yards from the front fence. Country people build out of site...on the back of the property.

City people put up big bright lights that shine ALL night...must be scared of the dark since it's never dark in the city.

City people put benches and swings at the entrance to their place so everyone can see them relaxing, I guess.

After about 2 years, city people sell their house and move on...nothing to do I guess.

That's the beauty of owning a piece of property and working on it everyday. At the end of the day you can sit back and enjoy the peacefulness and admire what you have accomplished.

That's the way I think anyway...

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Take a pic if possible.
O.K. Will do, but I'll have to use my old Olympus camera, since I don't want to take my newer Canon and leave it in the car during work.

Yes, there are some people here who also hire landscapers to do ALL of their work...how unrewarding!
Reminds me of the person a few days ago on the discussion side who asked about solving the weeds and grass problem between their 200 daylilies. I think they said they paid a professional landscaper $750/year to take care of the problem, and they were complaining about the expense. Getting down on your hands and knees and doing the weeding yourself is a lot of work, but rewarding in the end!

I came home from work today and found the electric power had gone out in my entire house. The garage still had power, but it comes from a different underground source. Called the Electric Co. and they sent out a worker who promptly fixed the problem. A fuse had blown, probably from an animal coming in contact with the connection at the top of a pole.

Anyway, what I'm getting at, is that the worker commented on some of my gardens, and said he had some of the same plants I did, and we began sharing growing tips. I walked him around a section of yard, showing him how some areas were grown over with perennials that had spread and filled in through the years. We talked about pruning shrubs, dividing and moving, mulching, and landscaping in general. When you meet another gardener (even if they're a complete stranger,) and start talking about planting your own gardens (rather than have a landscaping company do the work,) you also have the reward of making mew friends. He spent so much time talking with me that his phone rang, with someone on the other end wondering why his truck had been idling for so long and if there was trouble. He told them he was just talking to a customer, but he didn't tell them he was getting a tour of my gardens! We both had a chuckle over that.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

That's great! It's always nice to run into someone who shares the same passion.

I have been asked a few times, over the years, who does our landscaping at work. I do all the work and it is nothing special in my eyes, but they seem surprised when I tell them that I do it all.

It's kind of a compliment to me although they don't say it that way.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

You're so lucky to be able to do some gardening (landscaping) at your place of work. That's a reward in itself, that you have control over the planting and grooming. When people ask who does the landscaping, I'm sure they expect to hear "Such-and-Such" company did it, but are impressed when they hear you do it all!

The chiropractor I go to hires one lady to do all their landscaping, and she doesn't own a company, but she is a Master Gardener. They pay her to do it of course, and it's so unique, seeing the "personal touch" look of a cottage garden, not just a bunch of shrubs like every other business in town has.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

You're so lucky to be able to do some gardening...

Yes, but I don't have time to do a really good job like I would like to, and lately, it has got ahead of me. I need more time and just don't have it.

...not just a bunch of shrubs like every other business in town has.

Yes, some plantings in landscaping are beautiful, but repetitive. It's good to see variety.

I planted a papaya tree in between to different varieties of bamboo...all three of which get asked about regularly since they aren't common here in landscaping, but all are similar green and I need some colour variety.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

...but all are similar green and I need some colour variety.

Maybe plant some reblooming or everblooming daylilies for color.
I understand many daylilies readily rebloom in the South.
We seldom get rebloom in my zone, except for a few cultivars.

Here's some I would suggest:

(SE = semi-evergreen foliage, good for the South.
EV = evergreen foliage, good for the South.
If you see a daylily with Dormant foliage, I understand that kind doesn't always do well in the South.
EZ=eyesone
SSM = Stout Silver Medal award... the highest daylily award.)

Going Bananas - lemon yellow - SE
Daring Deception - lavender pink w/purple EZ & edge - SE
Dragon's Eye - pastel pink w/huge rose EZ - SE
Baja - Red - SE
Strawberry Candy - pink w/rose EZ - SE, SSM 1998
Buttered Popcorn - gold - EV
Butterscotch Ruffles - melon-apricot - SE
Elizabeth Salter - lt. pink - SE, SSM 2000
Fairy Tale Pink - pink - SE, SSM 1990
Lady Scarlet - red - SE
Little Business - red - SE
Mary Todd - yellow - SE, SSM 1978
Pandora's Box - cream w/purple EZ - EV

Those are some I'm more familiar with, because I grow all except Butterscotch Ruffles.

I know you don't have much extra time on your hands, but you can keep the above list for future reference.
You can see pictures of all of them plus MANY MORE rebloomers that I'm not familiar with at American Daylily & Perennials. They are originally from Texas, but are now located in Kansas.

I have never ordered from them, because I usually get daylilies from Northern growers, but it looks like a great sight for Southern growers to order from. They have been growing daylilies for over 25 years. If you click on "About Us" you can learn more about their breeding and testing.

I gave you the link to their repeat bloomer cultivars. Just click on the "retail" button, which will take you to 48 pages (3/page) of pictures. It looks like you would have to buy at least three of each variety, but that's what looks great in a landscape setting, esp. for a business.

If you would ever have time to browse that site, (maybe this winter,) and happen to purchase any, I would stay away from any variety that says Dormant. The dormant varieties do best in the North, where the foliage completely dies back during the winter. I only say this because I've read in the Daylily forum that the Southern growers have more trouble keeping Dormants alive, especially in the deep South.

I have daylilies with all three types of foliage, the majority of them being Dormant. I also have Semi-dormant types, and only about 30 Evergreen, since they sometimes struggle during an exceptionally cold winter.

Daylilies are a tough perennial. Yes, they may take extra care the first year, but that's true of any perennial. After established, they can handle drought conditions, (at least up here in the North.) In your situation, I would mulch around the plants to keep existing moisture in.

Sorry I'm babbling here, but you mentioned needing color, and the first thing I though of was ANNUALS! But they would take daily watering, something you surely don't have time for. Reblooming Daylilies are one of the most floriforous perennial bloomers I can think of, that's why I'm suggesting....O.K. I'll stop jabbering now.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Excellent, and thanks for all that info!!!

We had our outer garden removed at work to make room for more parking, but we used to have a dozen or more daylilies there. I liked the ones we had, and they really didn't take much care. We have a sprinkler system so watering is no problem as long as I don't forget to turn it on.:)

I'll look at the site and get some ideas then let you know what I think.

Thanks again!!!

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

You're welcome. Sorry I was such a motor mouth, but I'm as passionate about daylilies as you are about bamboo!

I'm going golfing.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Still looking...just letting you know.

There are soooo many beautiful daylilies on that site.

It's overwhelming. I can see why they become so addictive!

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Great!

You Southerners are lucky to be able to grow more repeat bloomers than we Northerners can.
I read about all the re-bloomers on the daylily forum, and they are forever posting those beautiful photos.

It might be nice if you could find a few to compliment your plantings at your work place...to add color!

About the "bamboo" that I mentioned "seeing" back on Sept. 3:
I took my camera with me one day last week when I knew I'd be driving in that area, hoping to snap a picture.
Remember I said, "Upon closer inspection, I realized it was a bamboo?" Well, that 'closer inspection' wasn't all that close. I was still driving 30mph, and it was about 30 feet or so off the road.

Just last week, I pulled in the driveway to this old homestead that must've been there over a hundred years. Anyway, there was a sign that said, "Honey for sale. Please drive in." So, with all intentions of buying a jar of honey, I drove in, knocked on the door, but no one answered. I then walked over to the 'bamboo' and discovered it wasn't a bamboo after all. (I feel so embarassed!) It didn't have canes with the nodes (is that the right term?), but rather had woody stems and branches with leaves that I'm sure were those of a Willow of some kind.

So there went my encouragement that my rufa will be just fine and dandy, since I was sure I had discovered another just like it in my area.

BUT, I still do feel good that I planted my two divisions in good areas to survive the winter. BTW, they both survived the harsh dividing and transplanting episode. I don't see many dead culms turning brown (yet.) All leaves are holding their green color, and I see no wilting or signs of stress.

I'll keep you posted on their progress.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Interesting...it would still have been nice to see a pic, but yes, probably not a bamboo.

However, some bamboo has non-prominent nodes and culms that look like wood. Bamboo does have branches and some with very thin leaves like a willow.

I have one bamboo that has the common name of 'Willowy' since it resembles the leaves of a willow.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

If I think of it, and if I get a chance, I'll try and snap a pic of that mystery 'shrub' and post it here.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Update:

As I was watering today, I noticed new shoots (culms) have shot up and they are a few inches taller than all the other culms that were growing in the pot.

Well, that sure is encouraging! Both divisions are doing the same shooting (don't know if I'm using the right terminology.) The one in the raised bed, and the one planted by the side of the house have three or four new taller culms.

Maybe they're settling into their new sites and sending out roots into the surrounding soil.

Just thought I'd share the fact that rufa seems to be doing better (growing more vigorously) than Panda did last year.

Will continue updating every time I get excited.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Great! Most clumpers shoot late in the Summer or Fall.

Sounds like they are doing great. If they are shooting, that means that they have energy stored in their roots, which in turn means that they must be thriving.

I'm happy to hear that! After a bad shooting season here with the lengthy drought, it's good to know someone has success!

Keep me posted.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

I remember last year Panda sent up only one new shoot in late summer and it was only 8" or so tall.

These new shoots on rufa are aproximately 2 feet tall, a few inches taller than the original foliage grew in the pot.

I'm hoping for taller shoots next year.
Things are looking good for this more vigorous variety!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

You should get taller shoots each consecutive year until it reaches maturity, which here would be from three to nine years,...don't know about your zone though, but things are certainly looking up for you and your new boo.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Here are some pics of Rufa that I found online.

I have an unknown bamboo that was sent to me as B. edulis, then the name was changed to B. odashimae but it never gets very large although it is supposed to get 65' tall with large green leaves, however, it looks like Rufa to me. It has never gotten over 6 feet tall and has leaves identical to Rufa...hmmm.

I will compare newly emerging shoots next year.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Nice pics!

The third pic looks like my Rufa with culms crowded together. The fourth pic looks to be about the same height as mine, with a few taller shoots around the outside edges.

Both my Rufa's leaves are still nice and green, not browned like some of my other perennials around here. I won't mulch them yet, but will treat them like some other perennials around here and wait until the ground freezes to cover them with a few inches of leaves/mulch.

It would be interesting if you have Rufa down there, because I didn't think Rufa could survive your summer heat.

The second pic showing snow on the ground is interesting. Looks like no winter protection is given. It also looks like a mature plant that wouldn't necessarily need extra winter protection.

Thanks for sharing those photos!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

That's why I posted the pic with the snow, I don't think it needs to be covered on top, just a good layer of mulch.

I didn't think rufa would survive here either, but it still looks like one of the fargesias although I'm still not completely convinced.

The third pic looks almost identical to mine when it was healthier...countless culms packed tight together, except mine seemed a bit more upright.

I will be matching my new shoots next year with those in the pic above.

Newly emerging shoots are one of the main identifiers of bamboo.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Newly emerging shoots are one of the main identifiers of bamboo.

Well then, I'll be sure to post Rufa's newly emerging shoots next Spring, so you can compare mine to your mystery Boo!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread F our

Thanks, that would be great!

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Both rufa 'boos' are alive and well, in their micro climates, and still showing green leaves, which haven't fallen off the culms yet.

But then, November is acting more like October lately, with daytime temps in the 60's. Usually we'd have had a hard frost by now...strange year.

Many fallen Oak and Maple leaves have blown up and around the basses of the rufas, and I'm hoping to set up some chicken wire cages to hold in the leaves...but there's still time. They are in locations where I can also shovel snow over them, if needed (good insulator.)

Kt, have you moved some of your plants into your greenhouse yet?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Great to hear that your boos are doing fine so far.

I wanted to move plants into my greenhouses starting yesterday(Sunday), but we started to get slight showers and I didn't know how much rain we would get so I put it off.

Here, I only got about a quarter of an inch, but just south of town they got over 4 inches.

I plan on moving some plants into the greenhouses next weekend...unless something else comes up.

It's tricky here in moving them since it can get into the upper 70's and even low 80's yet at this time of the year, so inside the greenhouses, it can get to over 100F, which can cook some of the more delicate plants.

Always a tricky situation...if I wait too long, then a freeze comes and I won't get all the plants inside...

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Always a tricky situation...if I wait too long, then a freeze comes and I won't get all the plants inside...

I can believe that.
And it's not like you can run out and throw sheets over all your tender plants if there's a frost warning.
People around here cover their tender plants with sheets or light blankets if they want to grow them outside a little longer in the Fall. Although most plants should have been brought inside by now.

I have some Dahlias that are in pots that have had their flowers and stems damages by frost, so I need to dig the tubers soon and store them in the basement.

I also have some rooted shrub cuttings sitting outside that are holding onto their leaves, and are perfectly happy. They won't need to come inside for the winter. I just need to find a protected spot and cover them all with leaves, pots and all for a winter hibernation. I was tickled pink that about 75% of my shrub cuttings rooted.

j


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

What kind of shrub cuttings?

Do you care to share your rooting techniques? I mostly just stick my cuttings in the ground or in an empty pot, if and when I can find one.

I have a few plants that are really cold sensitive including one bamboo that is only hardy down to about 40F...very strange, as I didn't know that anything would die unless from a frost...hmmmm.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

What kind of shrub cuttings?
Two or three of each:
Red Twig Dogwood
Vicary Golden Privet
Mock Orange
Wiegela (the variety is labeled, but brain can't remember)
Burning Bush.

Lost the Tamarix cuttings and a couple others.

Do you care to share your rooting techniques?
I found a good article online, writen by an author for Fine Gardening Magazine, on how to "Propagate Your Shrubs from Softwood Cuttings."

The tricky part is knowing when to take a softwood cutting. New tender shoots will rot before roots are produced, and older woody growth has a harder time putting out roots. The best way to test for softwood cuttings is to bend the stem, and if it breaks with a snap, it's ready to be harvested as a cutting. If a stem is too green, it will bend, but not break. If the stem is entering the woody stage, it won't bend at all. June and July, sometimes into August are good times (around here) to take softwood cuttings.

Lateral shoots make the best cuttings, and they should be taken early in the day when they are fully hydrated. As I take cuttings, I wrap the ends in wet paper towels, then place the ends in a plastic bag. The cuttings are short, with maybe three sets of leaves.

When I bring them in the house, I remove the lower set of leaves, leaving an open "wound". I also scrape the bottom sides of the stem a little. I also cut some of the top half of the leaves off, which cuts down on transpiration loss. I dipped the ends of the stems in rooting powder, (not directly into the pkg, but rather into a small amount of powder that I placed in a separate bowl.)

I then inserted the cuttings into moistened soil, maybe three to a pot, then covered with clear plastic bags to create a mini-greenhouse. I then set the pots on a table in my enclosed front porch, which is in constant shade, then forgot about them for awhile. (This is where I think I lost the Tamarix cuttings, because I didn't remember to check them often to see if there was too much moisture in the mini-greenhouses I created, and the Tamarix cuttings all rotted.)

I can't remember exactly how long it took before roots formed, but I'm sure I recorded it all in my garden journal...too lazy to look it up right now. But I do remember removing the plastic covers, and setting the pots out in direct sunlight, a few hours at a time. One of the little pots became the "abode" of a big toad. I saw the soil was disturbed one day, reached in to smooth out the surface, surprising both myself and the toad when I brushed its back. I left him in there, figuring he couldn't hurt the cuttings.

Next test will be to see if these little guys make it through the winter. I'll cover them well, but will have to make sure they don't dry out.

If I had more time, I'd find a place where I could bury the pots in the soil...might do that next year.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Thanks, Jule! That's pretty much what I do here with cuttings.

I have never really noticed much difference when I use rooting hormone and when I don't.

I've tried Superthrive, which seems to help more with sickly looking plants or those that need an added boost to get growing.

I've heard some people talk about it like it's the best thing since indoor plumbing.

A 4 ounce bottle can make up to 2000 gallons(one drop per gallon), but I use much more than that when I use it.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

You're welcome.

I've heard of Superthrive, but have never tried using it.

Googled the product, and read some comments from people who have conducted experiments, and some say there is no significant difference between using it during a regular watering program or not using it.

But I did find one comment that fits in with your comment about using it on sickly plants:

Re: Super-Thrive: Is It Snake Oil? permalink

---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------

I am a huge advocate of Super-Thrive and it is in no way "snake oil".

Super-Thrive is basically Vitamin B1 and Thamine. Thamine is a rooting stimulant that can be used on seedlings as well as newly cut clones. I also use Super-Thrive on any plant with signs or stress from transplant and it works wonders on them. The best part is the smallest amount, one drop, is all this is needed per. gallon of water. Because it contains no active fertilizers Super-Thrive has no chance of causing nutrient burn or any other damage for that matter, so one need not worry about giving it to their plants. Furthurmore, I have seen first hand the vigor Super-Thrive induces in struggling plants and I can tell you it does in fact work.

Super-Thrive DOES NOT increase bud size or yeilds and mind you this is not it's intended purpose. Most people gather this misconception from the advertisment which pictures super large fruit which they then equate to a wonder formula that will make their plants giants... not so. Rather, it is used as a quick and effective cure-all for immature and unhealthy plants.

About the only thing I dislike about Super-Thrive is the smell that just won't come off your hands.

Hmmmmmm...interesting.
Maybe I'll give it a try sometime.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

The Fargesia Rufas are still green...unbelievable!
The only other living green plants around here are the evergreen trees and shrubs this time of year.
I snapped a couple of pics yesterday, so you could see the snow on the foliage.

Rufa behind the garage is in the most protected spot, facing South, and sheltered from the most fierce winds.

Rufa next to the house has been roughed-up. It was under a pile of snow about a week ago, with all culms flattened to the ground. As the snow melted, some of the culms popped back up, almost vertical again! And still green! I'm impressed.

I figured for sure the leaves would have turned brown because of the many freezing temps we've had so far. Maybe the temp has to get much lower before the foliage suffers. We've had a fairly mild winter so far, but it isn't over yet.

Time will tell.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

They look great!

With bamboo, a general rule about the cold hardy temps given to a particular variety of bamboo is, for example, if the plant is listed as hardy to 10F, that is the temp that the top shows freeze damage, and depending on the length of the cold spell, it can lose all leaves and even freeze to the ground, but the underground rhizomes and roots are usually cold hadier to another 10 to 15 degrees.

Cold hardiness ratings are also for mature, established plants.

So, if it is listed to 10F, it can still survive temps down to 0F or even -5F. Many other factors are involved in the cold hardiness, not just temps, and also, different areas will list identical plants at different cold hardiness ratings...not sure why.

Thanks for posting! I think they will be fine, but this is their first season, so they may be hit a bit hard, but next Summers growth should really be interesting to see.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Many other factors are involved in the cold hardiness, not just temps, and also, different areas will list identical plants at different cold hardiness ratings...

I've seen Rufa listed on different sites, most of them listing hardiness to -20, and one site listing -15.

I can imagine wind is a hardiness factor, since it dries out plants in exposed sites. And of course it depends on the kind of state the plant was in as it entered winter dormancy (as you said, the maturity of the plant,) and how much water was absorbed by the roots. I didn't have to worry too much about that, since we had sufficient rain.

They shouldn't drown, since they've both got plenty of drainage.

Will keep you posted if anything changes...
Oh, and thanks for your continued shared bamboo wisdom!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Both rufas made it through the winter:)))

The one behind the garage is still very green, with some browning on the edges of the leaves. I didn't cover it, only mulched around the crown.

Rufa next to the house in the "wind tunnel" between the house and garage got some wind damage, and about half the culms have brown leaves. The culms that were burried under snow were more protected, and still somewhat green.

I will watch for any new growth, then will post pics here.
Might have to start a new bamboo thread soon, as this one is getting kind of long.

Will continue to update...

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

That's great to hear!!! I kind of figured that they would make it from what you had told me in your last few posts. I can't wait to see some pics.

You should have some good growth this coming year.

Some of my Bambusas got burnt badly here. I had time just before dark today, to check them closely, and most of the culms are goners on several of my more rare varieties.

On a good note though, I found out that some of the species, that I was told were not very cold hardy, survived undamaged or with little to moderate damage. So now I know which boos to plant where, at my place out in the country and I can relay this info to other bamboo growers in the area and let them know the hardiness rating first hand instead of a guess from a supplier who actually has no idea.

Anyway, I don't think that I lost any of the burnt boos, but they did get set back a year or so, but that's OK.

As I said before...my yard is one big experiment.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Our winter wasn't as severe as last winter, and their locations are better than where I planted poor 'Panda',
so I'm excited to see some growth this year...prob'ly not much though, since this would be their second year, and they may just creep along.

Time will tell.

Sorry to hear about your losses (of culms, that is.)
It sounds like those rare ones may still send up new culms from the roots. (Listen to me...as if I know what I'm talking about - Ha!)

...my yard is one big experiment
Ya, here, too - with trees, shrubs, perennials, vines, bulbs, tubers, seeds, annuals, etc......What Fun!!!

It will be fun to see when my two rufas start shooting (Is that the right term?)

Until next time...

Julie


 o
RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Lol! Yes, you DO know what you're talking about!

Yes, shooting is the right term and they should shoot in the Fall or late Summer in your area, although stray shoots can pop up at any time of the year.

My runners shoot in early Spring(any day now), and my clumpers shoot starting in mid-Summer on into late Fall.

Kt


 o
RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Shooting this up


 o
RE: Bamboo Thread Four

Need to review, so I sound like I know what I'm talking about.


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