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Bamboo Thread Two

Posted by luvtosharedivs 5a WI (My Page) on
Sun, Sep 28, 08 at 21:19

We might have to start another link as this one takes forever to load.
You're not kidding, it takes a long time!

I'll BET you're excited about your new 'Clone X'. 87 feet in five years sounds very impressive!

Green Panda is doing fine, I guess. The one new shoot that came up a while ago didn't grow very tall, only about 13-14", but I suppose that's because the nights are turning cool up here. All the foliage is still a nice green color, and I've been a good girl, watering it faithfully.

You mentioned a while back about possibly doing some trading in the future. I would very much like to do that IF Panda makes it through the winter O.K. Maybe we'll have to talk about that next Spring. I don't know how to reach you via e-mail, but you could always reach me, since mine is avaialable through my home page. Just let me know. When I retire, I want to get into this trading stuff more frequently, especially with the daylilies.

Oh, and if we do any trading, I will have to ask you how I divide Panda w/o killing it!

Julie


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Yes, I would like to trade for some Green Panda, but I would recommend letting it grow maybe one more year, unless it is very healthy and has numerous culms.

After planting bamboo here, I never take divisions from my plants for at least a year, but usually much longer.

If it had enough culms to divide when you bought it, then that would be OK.

My email is correct. I can't figure out why no one can ever reach me through My Page...oh well.

I rarely if ever divide at this time of the year, but did so with one giant today that I have in a pot. The pot was already huge, and repotting would mean using even a larger pot, and it's getting tough to move already so I got out my machete and whacked it half in two. Now I have two large thorny bamboos in pots to move around this Winter...not sure if that's a good thing.

Got a couple more that should have been repotted back in the Spring, but I should have time in the next couple of days...in between watering.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I would recommend letting it grow maybe one more year, unless it is very healthy and has numerous culms.
That makes sense. I just went out with a flash light and counted the culms - there are 15, but two of them were chewed off half way up by rabbits, before I surrounded Panda w/chicken wire. When I received the plant, it was very root bound. I have no idea how many culms is "enough" to be O.K. to divide. What do you think?

My email is correct. I can't figure out why no one can ever reach me through My Page
That's because your e-mail has not been made available on your Member Page. If you look on my member page, you can see at the very top there is a clickable "Send me an e-mail" link. You don't have that link on your member page. You would have to edit you member page to allow GW members to send you an e-mail. Here's how:
Click on 'Member Pages' in the green bar at the bottom of any GW page.
You may get a window that tells you to log in first.
The new window should say, "Welcome, Kentuck_8b"
Click on, 'Edit Your Personal Information, Page, and Preferences'.
You may be prompted to log in again.
You should then see the form where you can edit all your preferences.
Look at the very bottom, where it says, "Show my email address to:"
You can choose to show it to None, or Members, or All.
(I chose to show mine to None.)
Now the next thing you must do to allow members to send you an e-mail, is to click the box that says, "Allow other users to send you email via forms at our site."
Then at the very bottom, click "Save Your Member Profile"

That's all there is to it.
Now, you should see the "Send me an e-mail" link on your member page.
Then your mystery will be solved!

I got out my machete and whacked it half in two.
I sure hope I don't have to use a machete to divide mine!!!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I sure hope I don't have to use a machete to divide mine!!!

You shouldn't need one. The rhizomes I was cutting were over an inch in diameter and there were a few of them.

Since yours was pretty much rootbound and has that many culms, it may be OK for dividing next year, however, whenever you divide, the smaller the plant, the more it is set back. That'll have to be your choice.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Then at the very bottom, click "Save Your Member Profile". That's all there is to it.

Problem...When I click "Save Your Member Profile", it returns me to the login page and says I need to verify my password.

After three attempts with the same results, I stopped.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Hmmmmmmmmmm.....

I'm going to do some experimenting.....

Be back later.....

J.


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Editing

Well, Kt,

I don't know what to tell you.
I just opened another browser window, (and followed my own instructions, thinking I might have missed something), edited my page four times....twice to change my favorite forums, then back to the originals, and twice to switch my e-mail link to no e-mail link (like your member page shows), then back to allow GW members to contact me. It worked perfect every time.

I would suggest contacting the manager of GW and ask them what the problem might be.

Until then, you can e-mail anyone you want through their e-mail link, and (I guess you would know this already, huh?) as soon as the other party replies to you, they would have your e-mail. That's how I got Sue's, Bob's, and Mikie's. Their addresses are all saved in my address book.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I emailed Sue without any problem and like you said, then she was able to return an email.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

When I first saw your member page a long time ago, I thought you purposely left the e-mail option blank, so as not to get rif-raf messages, or people who might become pests. I notice there are a lot of GW members who don't wish to receive e-mails through the GW form. That's a good way to filter out who you privately want to talk with.

If I receive an e-mail that originated from GW, I may read it, but I don't necessarily respond to it if I don't know or trust the person. The less people that have your e-mail address, the better.

We (DH and I) get bunches of e-mails sent/forwarded to us through friends, BUT, they get messages from other people, who get messages from other people, who get....on and on. You don't know where/with who the messages originated, and they could contain viruses. So far, our anti-virus program has caught and destroyed/quarantined all viruses.

Our computer is actually set up as two separate computers, with different log-ins, different favorites, different screens, etc. DH doesn't bother to look at my e-mail, and I don't open any of his. But we DO share the e-mail jokes with one another. DH gets some NASTY messages sometimes, but he's careful not to open any that look suspicious.

At work, all of our staff have mailboxes, and we have to immediately delete anything that we don't recognize, esp. the ones with wierd character letters (like we get on the conversation side of the test forum.) Not only do we have to delete them, but also empty them from our trash. Central Office also has spam filters that stop hundreds of threats every day. If the computer system crashed in my line of work, it would be a disaster.

I sure am rambling....

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I emailed a few people over the years(including you), but got no response, so I figured either their filters identified it as junk mail or it was never delivered.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I emailed a few people over the years(including you), but got no response

There were some times in the past when our internet was down, or computer being worked on, or other odd reasons I may not have gotten your message. But feel free to e-mail me again, if you want. I don't have a junk mail filter....everything is allowed, unless I put the sender on my "blocked" list.

Julie


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Just now thought of something.....

...It could be that if I didn't recognize who you were, I may have deleted your message before even reading it, whenever that was. If you happen to e-mail me again, make sure you put something in the subject line that I would recognize, for instance:

Bambooholic
Guitars rule
Photography teacher

Something like that would trigger my brain into recognizing you.

Julie


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Green Panda

I think I will send a message to the nursery where I bought Panda from, here in Wisconsin. I know pretty much how I want to mulch it for the winter, thanks to you. However, I want one more opinion from them, since they didn't send instructions with the plant!
I have a bad feeling that they may have had it shipped in from a Southern location, then offered it for sale, along with several others. OR maybe they kept the bamboos in a greenhouse over winter. It will be interesting what they say. I'll let you know.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

The Fargesias are mountain bamboos and like the colder nights and overall northern climates.

They don't do very well this deep south, but with special care, they can survive.

I grew some Chusqueas a few years ago, and they can take some extreme cold and some can take extreme heat, but the ones that I had did fine year around except when the temps got over 90F...which is when they rapidly deteriorated.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

It sounds to me like you would be reluctant now, to trade for a Fargesia.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Not at all. Every bamboo is a learning experience.

I had an F. murielae here that did quite well for a while but these dry years are killers, and I had an F. nitida that finally died here...that was a sad day, but seeing how the deer had a taste of it when it was already very stressed, then the cows got in and trampled it(good thing my shotgun wasn't within reach), well something had to give, and the plant finally expired.

With correct care, they can survive...I just don't always have the time, especially when I never know when a drought will set in, or when the rains will return.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

O.K. then,
We'll see what happens over the winter with Panda, and maybe talk about a trade....ya think?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Sounds great.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

O.K.

TTYL

J.L.


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

OK = One Kilogram?

TTYL = Trying To Yawn Loudly?

J L = Jennifer Lopez?

What????


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

O.K. = okay = It is so; as you say or ask: absolutely, agreed, all right, assuredly, aye, gladly, indubitably, roger, undoubtedly, unquestionably, willingly, yea, yes. Informal = uh-huh, yeah, yep. Slang = right on.

TTYL = text to you later

J. L. = 'Joying Life


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I just got a reply from Klehm's nursery about mulching my Bamboo. They suggested I add 1-3" of mulch to help insulate and protect against freezing and thawing. They didn't say anything about protecting the culms. I really don't think Bamboo is one of their specialties....they just happened to offer a few different kinds that are hardy (hopefully) in our zone. I'm still thinking that they order them from somewhere else, (potted), and if they're not sold out, they're kept in a greenhouse for the winter.

I just gave Panda another good soaking, and added a couple inches of wood chips. I will still add a couple more inches before winter, but not yet. We will still get some warm Fall days during October. I'll add more as the weather turns colder. After the leaves fall off, I'll fill the cage with Oak leaves to protect the culms from chilly winds, as you instructed me.

Then it's just wait and see what comes up next Spring.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I think you're doing fine and everything will be OK, just remember(again), keep it watered well even during the coldest months..DO NOT let the ground dry out.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Okey dokey....will do!

I'm going to go write/arrange some string music.

TTYL

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Twor

Okie from Muskogee?

I have callouses on my fingers but most are in the wrong places. I do finger a few strings sometimes at night for a few minutes just to keep the fingertip callouses there, but my fingers are apparently too thick(blunt). It is hard to finger some chords without getting a buzz sound...but I am(will) working on it.

The guitar that I like to use has the softer or nylon strings which is easier to learn on but doesn't give me the callouses needed for the steel string guitar, so I have to get it out once in a while and twang it a while...just talking...

TTYL = Tea Totalling Young Lady??

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I started arranging a song for violin on the piano. I bet that doesn't make sense, huh? Well, the piano accompaniment for the violin solo is what I need to play to hear the correct chords in order to arrange new melodies and harmonies that sound good with the piano chords.

I have everything mostly in my head now....just have to get it down on paper.

Switched over to guitar for a while...nylon string classical. I'm learning a Mason Williams song called 'Fettuccini Western'. It's kind of in the style of Classical Gas, but a little slower. I wish I could find it on YouTube, but it's no where to be found. I, too, find my strings buzzing once in a while, because I'm so very out of practice, compared to what I used to be able to do! But this winter should provide some extra hours for practice....PLUS some needed time for photography study.

Tea Totalling Young Lady??
Sometimes drink green tea, or flavored black tea for my (still) swollen vocal cords.
Young? Ha! More like several decades old!
Lady? I certainly hope so!

I'm going to catch a snack before bed.

Later....

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Yes, that makes sense.

Fettuccini Western

I already had my ice cream snack tonight.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Three

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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

The link that you provided for 'Fettuccini Western' is the exact site where I purchased and downloaded the sheet music. Modern technology is awesome! Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find a CD that includes that song:(

Very interesting Bamboo guitar video!
After listening to the guitarist, I would say the quality of sound is definitely metallic, for several reasons.
1. A lot of Oriental music is "tinny" or metallic sounding to begin with, depending on the instrument being played.
2. The video itself, or my laptop speaker may contribute to the metallic sound.
3. The use of finger/thumb picks.
4. The position of the guitar players right hand near the bridge produces a bright, twangy sound. Did you ever experiment with the position of your pick or right-hand fingers on the strings? When you play close to the bridge, you get a metallic sound. The closer you move toward the end of the fingerboard, the more mellow the sound becomes. The player in the video has chosen to keep his right hand near the bridge for the whole song. Most classical guitarists will vary the tone quality by moving their right hand close to and away from the bridge.
5. Could be that bamboo wood resonates well for the high pitches, but not so well for lower tones. I have heard very low-pitched bamboo chimes, but that's because of the construction of the huge tubes. Flattened bamboo wood may act differently......I'm just guessing here.

I'll have to check the specs that came w/my guitars, if I still have them. I think most of them have Spruce or Rosewood tops.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

  • Posted by bob414 USDA 9, Sunset 15 (My Page) on
    Sat, Oct 4, 08 at 11:28

From the local news this morning.
I doubt the .12 inches of rain we got in our first rain since March is enough to keep it growing.


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Bob,
Are you trying to get me hooked on Bamboo, same as KT?
I see that the Mid-States Chapter of the American Bamboo Society covers zones 4, 5, and 6.

What will my neighbor say if I start planting hardy bamboo that creeps into his asparagus patch?!?!?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

  • Posted by bob414 USDA 9, Sunset 15 (My Page) on
    Sat, Oct 4, 08 at 13:50

No, I'm not trying to get you hooked. I might get hooked if I had as much room as you or Kt, but on my city lot and with our shortage of water there's no way.
I thought it was interesting that it grows to 50 feet high in one month. I'm thinking that someone with good eyes could see it grow.


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Jule, yes, I like the mellow sound produced toward the end of the fingerboard, and this is where I usually like to pick, of course, depending on how I'm sitting...

When standing, I tend to play like(what I call the John Lennon style) where my arm comes across the end of the guitar. I've seen Johnny Cash also play this way.

Bob, I grow the Madake bamboo as pictured in the photo, in my backyard, but it didn't do well after it's third year here for some reason. I still have it growing though.

The phyllostachys are the genus of bamboo that caused the 'bamboo panic' that everyone is frightened of. They are large and grow fast. It is one of the largest genus' of bamboo, but only a speck of all the over 1200 species out there.

Of all the phyllostachys, P.aurea aka golden bamboo aka fishpole bamboo is the most common and thus the most notorious, but with a little common sense, it can be planted in an area where it makes a beautiful grove.

There is a grove down at the river about a mile from here, that I used to walk through. Very Nice!!

Bamboo is just like anything else, it should be researched before planting it, especially IF you don't know anything about it.

Plant a clumper and then you never have to worry. Hundreds to choose from.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Try threading some paper through your guitar strings:

I've seen Johnny Cash also play this way.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Yes, I've seen him do that before also. Neat idea.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

In response to your post on the "other side" on Oct. 21:

I have a few giants that are cold hardy to 25F at best. They lose their leaves every Winter, and most of the tops of the culms.
What happens when the tops of culms die off? Do they stop growing up and send out side shoots?

Bamboo cold hardy temps are not real accurate(as with any plant) and that's because different areas have different types of cold spells. When a bamboo is listed as cold hardy to 15F, that's usually the temp that it loses it's leaves at, the culms are a few degrees hardier, and the rhizomes/roots are about 10 or 15 degress cold hardier than the topgrowth, unless extra protection is given.
O.K. My Green Panda is listed as hardy to zone 5, which can get to -15F (and, BTW, that rarely happens.) So, are you saying that the leaves could still be hanging on even down to -15? Wow, that's mighty cold! It will be very interesting to see which parts of Panda survive, and which die off. The weather forecaster said this morning that we will have strong winds on Sunday, with a possibility of SNOW SHOWERS (mixed w/rain.) Not all that unusual for WI, really. But I think I will get that protective cage ready on Saturday, so as not to send Panda into a shock. The really hard part will be next Spring, trying to guess when to start removing the protection of the Oak leaves from inside the cage. I'm guessing I should treat it like we do Roses, and uncover (at least partially) when the Forsythias bloom, mid-late April. Well, one thing at a time, I guess.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Do they stop growing up and send out side shoots?

First of all, remember, a culm grows to it's full height in one season, usually 90 days or less, at which time it puts on limbs and more leaves.

Limbs can usually be cut off and they will grow back, and leaves will grow back as long as the culm and limb is still alive.

I have some bambusas that will put up shoots very late in the year, and reach full height always just before the first frost. They usually only have a few leaves near the top. Then in the Spring, they continue where they left off, and start putting on limbs and leaves. These bamboos are tropical and normally do not have freezing weather, so they just go dormant until it warms up enough to start growing again.

OK, so, if the top of a culm freezes and dies, the culm will not grow any taller. It will only put on limbs and leaves making a bushier plant.

All Fargesias are cold hardy between 0F and -20F depending on the variety. I believe that Panda is cold hardy to about -5F which would normally mean that it will lose it leaves around that temp, not taking into consideration the wind or lack of water.

It also would mean that the underground plant should be cold hardy to -15F or -20F, also depending on amount of protection.

Here, most plants stop growing or drastically slow down in growth when temps go below 60F. Anytime after the temps get below 30F and stay there, it would be a good time to cover the plant.Yes, uncover it partially like you do with other plants would be best in my opinion.

Your plant is young and hasn't had time to get a good root system established, so it will need to be protected the most this first Winter.

I have two Oldhamii's that froze completely to the ground each of their first four Winters. Now they do just fine down to 15F with minimal leaf burn mainly from several consecutive days of strong dry north winds. At 40 feet in height and culms four inches thick, they have become much cold hardier with age.

More info than you asked for but hey...that's me...

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

More info than you asked for...

True, but it's all very interesting. I may not be able to retain it all, so feel free to repeat yourself whenever you feel "talkative."

You told me once a while back that the culms reach their full height in one season, in about 90 days or less, but I had forgotten about that....glad you reminded me.

But now I'm confused again, (nothing new for me.) For example, you said you have bambusas that shoot late in the year, and reach full height just before first frost. But you said in Spring, they continue where they left off. So how can they grow taller than their full height that they reached already?

One thing I won't be able to do after I add Oak leaves to the cage is water Panda. Right now, it's been watered well, plus we've had ample rain. I'm hoping when I add the leaves, they will act as a good mulch, holding water in the soil and keeping it from evaporating. If we have unexpected warm, dry Fall weather, I will at least try and water around the outer edges of the cage. Once the ground freezes (sometime between Thanksgiving and Christmas) I won't be able to water anyway.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

...they continue where they left off...

Sorry, what I meant was that they continue growing, as in putting on limbs and leaves, not necessarily growing in height, but in a few cases, there are a few culms that haven't quite reached their full height, and will then grow a few more inches in the Spring. The top few leaves usually freeze off.

This year was sooo dry, the shoots are only a few inches tall, and they should already be 30+ feet now. The plant also got overly dry a few times as I could not keep up with watering it regularly, and it has lost some of it's top leaves, but the culms are still green so they should put on leaves soon unless it freezes.

I still can't upload to photobucket for some reason. Anyway, as I mentioned, the leaves that were covered in ice don't die, and the ice is great protection from extremely colder temps, but that rarely happens here.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

... they continue growing, as in putting on limbs and leaves, not necessarily growing in height...

O.K. now I understand - that makes sense.

I don't know if you shared this Panda link before, or if I found it myself, but I see that this variety is a vigorous grower. I hope it gets taller than 4' next year, and I can't wait until the culms get .5" diameter. Some day I can raise my own bamboo stakes, (if I feel I have enough to spare that is)....or maybe I should save enough for trading.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

If it does well, I would divide it and plant several divsions in different places or make a hedge out of it, then you could have an endless supply of stakes to use or sell and you could also sell or trade divisions of the bamboo.

That's my way of thinking...

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Speaking of trading, I know how to ship daylilies, but not bamboos.

Daylily leaves are normally cut back to 6", and the roots are washed, and sometimes sent bareroot, or sometimes wrapped in moist newspaper or paper toweling, and wrapped again in a plastic bag, before packing them in a box.

But how on Earth do you send a bamboo. I can't see cuttin shoots back, because they wouldn't regrow, would they?

Do you ship them before they shoot their culms up, or if they have started to grow, do you just bend them back if they're not too tall?

And finally, assuming the rhizomes aren't suppose to dry out, do you wrap them with something that will keep them moist during shipment?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I have received bamboo in several ways. Some has been bareroot, some with most of the soil removed, then wrapped in cloth or paper, and some in pots which is how I send mine, that way the roots aren't disturbed. I had one sent to me as a fresh-dug rootball.

Bamboo is pretty tough. The rootball that was sent to me was dug just before shipping, and it had only one culm, cut back to about 14 inches in height with no limbs or leaves...it was originally over 30 feet in length/height.

Cutting the culms back won't hurt, but on smaller bamboos, I usually just bend them over...down...or around to get them into a box.

A bamboo growing in a pot can be shipped at any time since you are not disturbing it in any way. If you are sending it fresh-dug or bareroot, then you don't want to do this just before or during shooting since it can harm the new shootbuds and new shoots.

I try to get bamboo to a small size, which can be difficult if trying to do so by division. A one-gallon pot is normally what I like to send, but have sent as large as three gallon pots, but the price goes way up for shipping a plant/pot that size/heavy.

I will put newspaper around the base of the plant against the soil, then wrap the whole pot in plastic and tape it where no dirt can come loose. Sometimes the culms need to be wire-tied(taped) together and the pot will have to be secured so that it doesn't move around inside the shipping box. I will tape old bamboo culms/stakes to the outside of the pot, all the same length as the inside of the box, then when the pot is put in the box, it can't move upward if the box is turned upside down during shipping(like the Post Office would ever let that happen anyway...right?).

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Sorry to bombard you with so many questions, Kt,
But you sure are kind to answer so thoroughly!
I'm going to eventually print that info, but I'm on the wrong computer for printing right now, so your post is going in my clippings until I get around to printing it.

I'm not sure when Panda is going to send up shoots, but I'm guessing (hoping) sometime in Spring. So if I understand you correctly, if I were to trade with you, or anyone else, I prob'ly shouldn't ship in Spring if I see it beginning to shoot then. Maybe sometime in Summer would be better?

Then there's the whole issue of sending plants during the heat of summer. I don't worry about sending/receiving Daylilies during the heat of summer if they're wrapped properly to keep the roots moist, because they are also very tough plants. But have you ever received a Bamboo in the heat of July or August?

Oh, I just rememberd I still have the box that Panda came in. It's very tall and might be just right for shipping without cutting the culms back. Trouble is, shipping cost may be pricey with a box that's almost 4' high.

Anyway, thanks for all that valuable info!
First things first - I have to get Panda through it's first winter before I even think about trading.

Yesterday I raked enough dry leaves to fill two lawn & leaf bags. I knew it was going to rain on & off all weekend, and don't want to mess with wet leaves, when I fill the chicken wire cage around Panda. I'll probably put Panda to "bed" for the winter tomorrow, because Sunday we're supposed to have 40mph winds with a chance of showers (rain/snow mix) toward evening. I'm sure Panda won't like those high winds.

So then, if and when we ever decide to do some trading, I may ask you all over again, what would be the best way to ship a div. of Panda down to the deep South, depending on what time of year it is.

Thanks!

Julie;)


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

But have you ever received a Bamboo in the heat of July or August?

Yes. Bamboo is pretty tough, but I do worry about extreme heat and extreme cold, however, I have received it by mail in Winter and Summer.

Some nurseries won't send it until late Winter or Spring. I have a couple of boos potted up to send to northern California, but the guy wants me to wait til Spring since it is more convenient for him. The same goes for me...I usually order or get bamboo when it is best for me. Since I have a greenhouse, even if it is Winter, I can keep it potted and warm til Spring.

I keep all my bamboos potted until I can take a division, then I will plant one in the ground. That way, if the outside one doesn't make it, I still have a 'backup' plant.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

It sounds like you are able to receive Bamboo just about any time of year, but you prefer the Spring. Now, if I can't ship in the Spring because Panda is shooting, I may have to wait to see how Panda behaves before I decide when the best time is to ship....IF it makes it through our WI winter.

Yesterday I stuffed Oak leaves inside the chicken wire cage, then added another 24" section above the bottom one, and stuffed that one with leaves, leaving a few inches of leaves exposed. (Too many leaves in that sentence.) I felt good about the job I had done, until today, that is.

This morning I found the whole cage toppled over on the ground, (due to the nasty winds we've been having today) but the culms didn't break. I straightened the cages back upright, and the culms easily bent straight again - they sure must be resilient!

Anyway, the "staples" I used to hold the cage down just weren't going to hold against any strong wind, so I decided to add metal stakes around the perimeter of the cage - 6 of them. But they were thin, and I still wasn't confident that they would hold through the winter, so DH suggested driving in two heaver (thicker) metal stakes, one on the West side, and one on the East. All stakes were tied with nylon rope sections. Now that cage is going NOWHERE!

After toppling over, the cage lost many of its leaves, so I added more, but wasn't satisfied, because the leaves kept blowing out the top, with our fierce winds today. So I did what I didn't want to, and that was to cover the leaves completely, then weigh them down a bit with a few pieces of tree bark. I can remove the bark and leaves a little at a time as the weather warms up next Spring.

I feel so odd giving Winter protection this early in the season. All other perennials around here don't get winter protection until AFTER the ground freezes. The idea of winter protection in those instances is to keep the ground frozen, and guard against alternating freeze/thaw cycles.

This is a picture of Panda in the cage just before I added more leaves and bark to cover it completely.

Panda

Last Friday I happened to talk to someone at work about my Bamboo, and she said, "Be careful. It will spread all over the place and you will have a hard time getting rid of it."
She had some bamboo at a previous residence that she got from somewhere up north of here, but didn't know the name of it. When I asked her how tall it was, she said 8-10 feet. I told her it sounded like a runner type, rather than a clumper type, and she didn't know what I was talking about.

See????? What you taught me is good stuff - at least I know the difference between a runner and a clumper!

It sure is going to be a loooooooong Winter for Panda.....

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Yes, so many people are uneducated when it comes to bamboo. As we talked before, there is basically one genus that causes the big scare, but it is only a fraction of the total number of bamboos that are out there.

Looks like Panda will be protected well from the wind this Winter.

It will be interesting to see how well it does. Here, we have an average of 6 nights each year with temps below 32F, but we get as many as a dozen or more, and nights with frost are even more.

That's where the problem comes in down here,...warm days and cold nights. If it stayed warm for a week or cold for a week it wouldn't be so bad, but usually it's a daily thing and the temp can vary as much as 40 degrees from nighttime lows to daytime highs which is very very hard on plants.

I think Panda will do fine. My only concern would be that it isn't completely established yet. The covering may be a problem also. I would leave some uncovered at least until it gets below freezing, since it will be completely dormant below 32F.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I would leave some uncovered at least until it gets below freezing, since it will be completely dormant below 32F.

When you mentioned that, I recalled in my cob-webby brain, that you told me to do that a while back, but I forgot.

Thanks so much for being patient with this forgetful Northerner, who forgets to read her notes!

I just went out during our first snow flurries of the season, and removed the tree bark and about 8" of leaves from the cage. So now, the top-most leaves can still soak up whatever sunshine we may get before the temps fall to mostly below freezing.

Thanks!!!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I recalled in my cob-webby brain...

...snow flurries...

Brain-freeze?:)

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Brain-freeze?

Ha!
No, just dusty & cluttered up there!

jl


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Supposed to get as low as 35F here tonight. I don't have anything protected and my greenhouses are empty.......guess I will need to start moving plants in for the Winter.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

From The Bamboo Forum, On Winter Protection.

"Mulch heavily to protect the rhizome mass. Regardless, you're going to lose the leaves, and most likely the culms will also die. Although I have never tried this, I might be tempted to make a tent for the culms out of clear visqueen, and weight down the bottom so it won't blow off. If you put a layer of bubblewrap under the visqueen, this would be even better."

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Good to know, Kt!

I have an old plastic (prob'ly polyethylene) runner that I could use around the cage we constructed. It would help protect against the nasty blizzards we often get here.

I just spoke to DH about how we could fasten sections together, since I had no idea how to do it. He said we could punch holes in the sections and use zip ties to hold them all together. I'm not sure I want to cover the top though, because the snow we get should help insulate the upper section of the culms (if they even live - which they prob'ly won't.) Pretty soon I think I should add dried leaves to the top of the cage, over the exposed Panda leaves. I haven't looked at it closely lately.

Just babbling here...what an experiment I have ahead of me.

Thanks for the tip!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Panda is wrapped for the winter!

I tried looking for the old polyethylene runner that I thought I saved, but could find it nowhere, so had to go to Menard's and have them cut a 13 ft. length. I cut it into three equal lengths, and with DH's help, we secured the sections together with ziplock ties (in the holes DH drilled.) We also secured a few places to the metal rods holding the chicken wire in place.

I topped off Panda's leaves (surprised to see they were still green) with oak leaves, then added some tree bark to hold the leaves in. I didn't want to cover the top with plastic, because I want air to be able to circulate, in case we get some winter thaw cycles. And I don't want to create a greenhouse effect in the middle of any sunny January days, which may cause Panda to want to wake up and start growing again. Besides, I want to collect any precipitation, whether it be rain or snow.

This is still so new to me. I have never in my life done so much to one plant to protect it against winter cold and wind! I'm hoping I don't have to do this every year! Maybe one more year of heavy protection, then Panda's gonna have to survive on it's own, (with maybe a few inches of mulch over the crown.) I can imagine it will get larger in circumference, and I sure don't want to have to provide a huge diameter cage for it every year!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

(surprised to see they were still green)

Panda's leaves should stay green until close to it's cold hardy temp, at least 5F but probably lower.

We have had a few nights in the 30's already, and I just put most of my plants in my greenhouses this past Friday.

I have a few larger plants that are very hard to move, that are still outdoors. I will lay them down on the ground on colder nights so they get heat from the ground.

Some of these bamboos are only cold hardy to 40F and some to 32F, but they have done fine so far.

Keep a close eye on Panda, since your cold is much harsher than ours here, I'm not sure what to expect either, but remember that you can also smother a plant by giving it too much protection, but I think you'll be fine with what you have done.

Keep me posted.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

...but remember that you can also smother a plant by giving it too much protection

Actually, the plastic isn't surrounding the chickenwire cage very tightly. The metal support posts are outside of the chicken wire, eight of them, in fact. Then the plastic is outside of the metal posts, with approximately 1" or more air space in between the plastic and the wire cage. Also, air can circulate a little through the Oak leaves, since they curl up, rather than lay flat like Maple leaves do.

I think the real challenge will be to know when to start taking the leaves out and away from the Bamboo in Spring. One of the challenges of gardening is that every year is different, and we can't rely on certain dates as guidelines to do this or that. Springs can be deceivingly warm too soon, then shock us with late freezes. Or we can have exceptionally wet or dry winters. I think the native plants know best when to bloom. I'll watch to see when the Forsythias bloom here. That's the time people start uncovering their Roses (if they've been covered.) That should be a good time to start uncovering Panda. I might be able to remove the plastic before that, then gradually remove the leaves. (Don't mind me- I'm just thinking out loud about different options.)

It's interesting how you lay your taller/larger plants down to get heat from the ground. What we humans do for our plants, huh?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

It's interesting how you lay your taller/larger plants down to get heat from the ground.

Yes, it works on the not-so-cold nights, down to the upper 20's or so, or when the temps are low for only short periods of time.

I have several heavy pots, some over 90 pounds and it is difficult to move them in and out as the weather changes. They are too tall to stand upright inside either of my greenhouses, so I just lay them down. I used to move them in and out but it's just too much work.

Days are too short now...dark by 6pm as compared to after 9pm during mid-Summer. Sure do miss the daylight hours. Leave before sun-up and get home around sundown.

Sundown

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I have several heavy pots, some over 90 pounds...
Is there a reason why you keep them in large pots, instead of planting them directly in the ground?

Sure do miss the daylight hours.
Same here. And I miss the warm temperatures for working outside. Today I could only stand to be out (trimming back spent perennials) for half an hour before my fingers became numb.

Sundown...another great G. Lightfoot song. I just looked for that music in my collection, but can't find it. I could have sworn I had the chords for it. Speaking of chords, I'm heading over to the "more guitar chords" thread...

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Is there a reason why you keep them in large pots, instead of planting them directly in the ground?

Yes, most are not very cold hardy, and would not survive without Winter protection. So it is easier to keep them in a pot at the present time, until I get setup out in the country where I will be able to give them in-ground Winter protection.

A couple of others are cold hardy enough to survive, but I don't need any more of them in the ground here as my yard is already full of giants. I have plans for them out in the country also...someday...

Temps where you are must not change much from night to day. Here, it was 36F this morning, but got up to 72F this afternoon. It's not uncommon to see a 40 degree difference between night and day temps. This is why it is so hard to keep plants alive(especially in pots) during Winter months. They try to grow during the day, then when watered, they want to root-rot at night.

Coats in the morning, t-shirts in the afternoon.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Here's the Bamboo I wanted to ask you about...
I read an article in the "Horticulture" magazine (Hmmmm...was that title supposed to be underlined?) titled "Superb Power Plants." It mentioned Hardy timber bamboo, Phyllostachys vivax. A photo was shown, and it's supposed to be hardy in zone 5, according to the article. I don't think the author knew much about bamboo terminology though, because her statement about this plant was, "Timber bamboo has bold form, with its multiple slender stems." Shouldn't she have said "culms"?

I did some Google-searching, and found its hardiness range is recommended for zones 6 - 10, with a min. temp. of -5 . So the author of the article must be wrong(?), saying it's hardy to Z5, because we (in Z 5a) can get down to -20 , although I've seldom seen it get that low.

So, my question is, have you know anyone is Z5 who has grown this bamboo with success?

And is it a runner?

One more Q - In my google-searching I found Phyllostachys vivax 'Aureocaulis' - Greenstripe Vivax...such pretty culms! (also hardy to -5 )
Would that one be out of the question for my nasty climate?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

The listed cold hardiness temps are for above ground growth, so you can get 10 to 15 more degrees of cold hardiness underground especially with protection, and if you lay the culms down sometimes they will remain alive and just need to be stood back up once uncovered. It can be a lot of work covering and uncovering the boo as temps go up and down and as snow falls, then melts. The amount of work you put into protecting it will be your choice, but most likely it will survive underground.

I have covered and uncovered my bamboo here on a daily basis for months, only to have one last late freeze come and kill it off above ground anyway, so the time spent may not be worth it.

I have both Phyllostachys vivax and Phyllostachys vivax 'Aureocaulis' both of which are listed to -5F as you mentioned, so their actual cold hardiness for underground roots/rhizomes is a bit lower, perhaps 15F or more.

Neither does very well here. The P. vivax took off like wildfire it's first couple of years then slowly regressed. The Aureocaulis is slowly growing, but doesn't look like it will ever do much.

They are both runners, and in your zone from what I'm told and read, is that the runners usually act like clumpers and spread very slowly. If you have soil that's easy to dig into, it would be worth a try, since you could push a spade or shovel around the clump once a year and cut off any rhizomes that may try to spread outward, or you could plant it and dig a trench around it. As new rhizomes grow into the trench, simply cut them off. You could even fill the trench with mulch or something similar.

They are lsited to grow to 70 feet in height, but would never reach that height in your area, 15 feet might even be a stretch, since the top growth would probably freeze to the ground every year without any protection.

Some others of the same Genus of bamboos which are cold hardier are:

P. atrovaginata INCENSE BAMBOO -15F & 35ft. This bamboo has been known to survive -20F. It can grow in very wet spots and if you rub the culms at certain times of the year it smells of incense. Interesting.
P. aureosulcata YELLOW GROOVE BAMBOO and six of it's subspecies are all hardy to -10F & 25 to 45ft.
P. bissetii & bissetii 'Dwarf' -15F 40ft & 18ft respectively.
P. viridiglaucescens -11F & 35ft.

There are also two other varieties of Vivax that are cold hardier than the two above.

P. vivax 'Huangwenzhu' & P. vivax 'Huangwenzhu Inversa', both hardy to -9F & 70ft tall.

Here are Gib Cooper's Picks for cold hardy bamoo from Tradewinds Bamboo in Oregon.

OK, now after all of that, from what I've heard from northern growers is, yes, you could grow it, but it might freeze back to the ground each year, and certainly in it's first couple of years. It would need to be planted very early so that it could take advantage of all the growing time possible before the following Winter.

I think P. bissetii is more commonly grown in the north and some say it is more cold hardy than listed, but I don't know that for a fact.

I'll do some research on some other more colourful bamboos and see what I can come up with.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Oh, good grief, I think I must feel like you did when I was explaining string types to you.

Well now, I certainly don't want to go to a lot of work trying to keep a "borderline hardy" variety of bamboo alive, expecially when they cost $60!

That's precisely why I asked for your advice, and thank you very much! I'm still in the baby stage as far as attempting to grow even ONE kind of bamboo here.
(BTW, I won't know how Panda has done until I start to uncover it next April or so. The one big drawback of mulching heavily with leaves, is that the mice love to crawl in cozy areas like that for winter protection, and they may find the culms to be tasty winter food. In that case, all my winter protection efforts will have been useless. We'll see.)

I guess I should stay away from P. vivax varieties for the time being...UNLESS I can find one for $30 or less...fat chance, huh?

The Yellow Groove sounds like a possibility.
The Incense Bamboo sounds like it may need a moister soil than I can provide.
P. bissetii has a nice dense canopy - pretty!
P. viridiglaucescens can tolerate quite a bit of shade.

Hey! I sure like the looks of P. vivax 'Huangwenzhu Inversa'! I like the yellow culms w/green stripes! But alas, it sounds like another borderline hardiness variety.

Fountain bamboo requires moist soil conditions.
Crookstem - sounds like a great possibility!
Nude sheath - another possibility - I like the powdery blue culms!
Dwarf White Stripe looks to be marginal.
K-Zasa - marginal
Sasa t - marginal
Temple bamboo - love the burgundy culms, but again, marginal

Thanks for all that info!
I might be willing to try a runner if it's a variety that dies to the ground every year. After the holidays I should have more time to decide if I want to purchase another one or two. I just can't justify paying $60 yet. I'm willing to go $30, and that's about it.

Again, thanks for sharing your expert knowledge with me!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

If I can get a small enough division for you, I'll be glad to send you a P. vivax or a P. v. 'Aureocaulis', but it might take some time to get a division small enough to send economically.

I send a lot of divisions to people whom I trade with, but I only ask for a division in return in case my plant doesn't survive. That's my insurance for a plant that I really like, but can't always give attention to and keep alive here.

If you ever order a $60 bamboo, for example, and want to trade some, divide it, and send me half. I'll be glad to pay for the other half plus shipping, or trade it for something.

Anyway, there are many other bamboos that do well in your area, although they may never flourish to their max, they will do quite well. I'll look more into it.

You may want to try something in a pot. Potted bamboos do quite well here, but since your growing seasons are much shorter, and Winters are much longer, it may be difficult keeping them alive during the colder months, but I think it is something to look into.

Anyway, I'd at least see how well Panda does this Winter, then go from there. It's new to me also, and will be interesting to see how well Panda does for you. If it does well, go for more.

As I can see, and have experienced myself...bamboo is VERY addictive.

You're an addict...admit it!

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

If you ever order a $60 bamboo, for example, and want to trade some, divide it, and send me half. I'll be glad to pay for the other half plus shipping, or trade it for something.
Very kind of you! I'll keep that in mind.
I should prob'ly be patient first, and see how Green Panda does before I invest in a "Bamboo forest."

You're an addict...admit it!
No, just curious, that's all.
I remember seeing a Bamboo society on the web somewhere in Ohio or something, which might be the same zone as me. I'll browse a little and see if I can find some cold hardy varieties there.

Thanks again!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

No, just curious, that's all.

"Curious"?? Never heard bamboo addiction described as 'curious' before...They'd get a kick out of that one on the Bamboo Forum.:)

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Yes, curious..really!

It's not like I HAVE to have a certain variety, and if I don't get it I'll absolutely die!
That's how I feel about certain Daylilies or Hostas, (have to have, or I'll die) and I'm willing to pay higher prices for them. And I often buy a new variety on a whim if I see something in a nursery that I don't have. Now here's a sign of addiction: buying ten new varieties of Daylilies, not knowing where the heck I'm going to plant them...but oh well, I'll figure that out later...I have to have these now!

Now with the Bamboo, I'd have to do some serious thinking/planning as to where the best soil and lighting would be before purchasing such a variety that would definitely survive my zone! It would be risky to purchase some expensive variety that has beautiful striped culms, only to have it die on me because of my lack of care, or its lack of super hardiness.

No, I am not addicted to Bamboo...just mildly curious...in the experimenting stage, that's all.

J.


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Yeah...right.;)

Now here's a sign of addiction: buying ten new varieties of Daylilies, not knowing where the heck I'm going to plant them...

Why do you think I have so many 'potted' bamboos? Yep, no place to put them, but I just had to have them. However, some are divisions of in-ground plants and some are for trading/selling. They will all find a future home at my place out in the country when I get things set up better out there.

Crazy, huh?,...clear out woods so that I can fill it back up with bamboo...is that insane or what?

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Outdoor bamboo has started to lose some leaves already. We have had more cold spells than usual for this point in the season, but none have been extremely cold although we did have ice once and it has been below freezing quite a few times already.

The really cold temps come in January and February.

The bamboo, out in the country, that I so diligently watered all Summer long looks really great. That general area gets colder than here, but the thick woods have served their purpose well...they have insulated the bamboo and held in enough heat to keep even the tender bamboos from losing any leaves yet. I have more leaf loss from lack of water.

Looks like it will be a great place to grow bamboo, just as I had hoped.

How's Panda? Still snug as a bug in the rug?

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Looks like it will be a great place to grow bamboo, just as I had hoped.

That's great news! All your diligent work has paid off!
I bet the trees also help block strong winds. Are you going to have a water well dug out there next Spring or Summer? Sounds like you're planning on planting more Bamboo out there. Gonna have a bamboo forest some day?

Panda is snug, alright. I looked inside it's protective poly-whatever cage, and some snow has precipitated (is that a word?) down the sides between the chickenwire and the poly-stuff. But there is still some air space left for breathing room. The Oak leaves have settled, probably from having several layers of snow weighing them down.

I just hope mice haven't made that cage into their winter home. And if so, I hope they aren't eating bamboo culms for breakfast, lunch and supper!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Are you going to have a water well dug out there next Spring or Summer?

Yes. I am still on the waiting list to have one dug. With service calls beings so numerous because of the drought and over-use of wells, they have been slow to drill new wells. I was hoping to have it there back in May, then I was just hoping to have it done by the end of the year. Now I'm shooting for Spring.

Good to hear that Panda is hanging in there. I have heard of mice eating newly emerging shoots, but not mature culms, but I have seen mice eat just about anything if they are hungry enough.

Good Luck

Kt


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Bamboo Update

I checked on some of my boos out in the country this afternoon, and amazingly, the not-so-cold hardy ones still have green leaves. Some of the same plants here have frostbite, so again, it looks promising for my bamboos.

Third week in January the brushgrinder guy will be back to finish what I need done, which is only a few hours of work.

Then I can get a barn built, storage room moved in, and waterwell dug.

I'm a year behind where I should be, but at least things are starting to move and then I can get started moving everything out there.

Anyway, back to my boo. It really hasn't needed much water since they basically become dormant and we have been getting small sprinkles on and off for a few weeks.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Then I can get a barn built, storage room moved in, and waterwell dug. I'm a year behind where I should be, but at least things are starting to move and then I can get started moving everything out there.

It's starting to sound like you're planning to move everything including yourself out there! A quite, secluded, peaceful place it would be indeed....oh, wait a minute...I forgot you're going to build that big mansion with swimming pool and guest house...sort of a resort, if I remember how you originally described it! (kidding)

Really, when you say "everything", do you mean all your potted bamboos?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Yes, everything...including me. It will be years in the process.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Oh my!

Moving your cattle and greenhouses too?!?!?

Adding an extra wing or two onto your shack?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Moving your cattle and greenhouses too?!?!?

Greenhouses, yes, cattle, no.

Adding an extra wing or two onto your shack?

Eventually. I'm trying to figure out how to 'tie' into the shack since it keeps shifting. I've got my work cut out for me.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Temperatures will be rising this weekend, and much of our snow cover will melt. I hope to take a peek at Panda, to see what's going on under the cover of Oak leaves. I can see from the house, that the leaves have settled under the weight of snow, to the point where the tops of the culms might be showing. If I see any, I may give them a gentle tug to see if they're still intact. I'm still worried about mice nibbling on them.

Do you do much watering in these winter months?
I bet you've moved many potted plants to your greenhouse.

Oh, and BTW (off topic), I DID get a chance to read your description about the Indian way of smoking meat, but didn't get a chance to respond before all the spam posts bumped it off. It was very interesting reading...thanks for taking the time to share the description. I bet that smoked meat tasted great! But then, I think any food that's cooked outside tastes especially good.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I have been watering every single day. The drought is continuing and NO end is in sight. Trees are still dieing. No green anywhere for cattle to eat and we are in a burn ban.

Hay is scarce. Even with watering the yard, I can't keep up and plants are dieing. If we don't get water within the next two or three weeks, then we won't have a Spring.

Drought has made wild hogs brave and they have uprooted almost out whole homeplace I'm going hunting before work in the morning to try and run them off for a while.

Getting ready to move my plants back out of the green house in about three weeks. Not much of a Winter. Got down into the 20's about five times, the lowest being about 23F. Some bamboos may have died...not from the cold, but from lack of water.

Still can't get a waterwell drilled at my place out in the country. Smoked meat tastes great, but like you said, everything tastes better when cooked outdoors, or maybe it's just eating it outdoors that makes it taste better, I don't know.

How cold did Panda have to endure this Winter?

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Drought has made wild hogs brave and they have uprooted almost our whole homeplace...

How frustrating that must be!
Do you mean your country place where you've planted all those bamboos?

I sure hope you can get a well dug soon!

Sorry to hear some of your Bamboos have died...hope you have (living) divisions of those that died.

How cold did Panda have to endure this Winter?

Remember when I mentioned those couple of days in January that reached -12? and further out in the country it was -19? That lasted for two days. But I'm hoping the snow cover insulated them (at least the roots!) It has been consistently cold, but the snow cover lasted, so the ground temps weren't nearly as cold. We never got our usual January thaw...may get a February thaw instead. Panda will be in more danger if the snow melts altogether, then we get a deep freeze again. March can still have fierce winds, so I won't be in any hurry to remove Panda's protection until some time in April. Only time will tell.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

The hogs aren't at the place where I have most of my bamboo in the country, or where I was watering all summer long, they are at our 'home' place about three miles from my place.

I decided to go water tomorrow sometime since the weather is warm and plants are budding out. It will take me at least three hours to water and fill all my tubs, but it is extremely dry and I can't stand to see the plants shriveling up.

I am waiting to see how Panda fared. Interesting.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

You have so many country places, I get confused.
O.K., I think you're probab'ly talking about that place with the building I asked about a while back, that looked like a cabin or house of some sort, and you showed some of the ground dug up by those darn hogs.

I anyone helping you with the hunting?

I didn't have time today to take a look at Panda...maybe tomorrow. I'll report back later...

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

'My' place is the one with my house on it that I've post pics of often, and is very wooded. The 'home' place is the one, yes, with the cabin on it with the digging.

The hunters had permission from all the surrounding land owners to cross their property, so I sat down at a known hog crossing on our property, and waited for them to come but never even heard their dogs, so I don't know if they ever showed up. I had to get to work so I left.

It is always a nice place to sit even if for nothing else. Very peaceful, and only sounds of nature and an occasional plane flying high above. It could be 200 years earlier and you wouldn't know it. Nothing modern in sight. I likey.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

It is always a nice place to sit even if for nothing else. Very peaceful, and only sounds of nature...

You are very fortunate to have a peaceful place like that, to get away from it all, and just unwind, and fill your senses with the sights, sounds and smells of nature.

I was able to get out today in the warm (42) winter sunshine and do my first yard chore of 2009. Enough snow melted, that I was able to see all the windfalls from the winter storms. We (DH helped) picked up a couple wheelbarrow-fulls of fallen twigs and branches, and tossed them on the burn pile. What a great feeling to breath in all that fresh air!

Guess what!

PANDA'S O.K.:)))))!!!!!

I reached down into the Oak leaves to find a few culms, with leaves still intact, (although dried), and gently tugged on them, and they held! The mice haven't touched them:)))

Decided to try a test that I often do with woody shrubs to see if they're still alive. I can scrape the outer layer of a branch with my fingernail to reveal a green layer underneath, meaning the shrub is alive. I did that with one bamboo culm, scraping a thin outer layer, to reveal an inner layer of firm light yellow-green growth.

What do you think? I mean, how can you tell if a culm has died? I know they are very tough, otherwise they wouldn't be made into stakes, fishing poles, furniture, and wind chimes. But wouldn't the little (thin) culms snap if they were dead?

Anyway, I'm hopeful that Panda will make it through it's first WI winter.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Bamboo is basically a large grass so it doesn't have the phloem and xylem layers like a tree or shrub, so scraping probably is not a good way of indicating life.

If the culms are still green, then it should be OK. If they are discoloured, spotted or brown, then there may be a problem.

Sounds like it is alright to me. GREAT!! Any photos??

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

...the phloem and xylem layers ...
Learned something new here...so that's what they're called.

But doesn't apply to grasses.
Hmmmmm, thanks for straightening me out.

The culms I examined looked green, but I only looked at a few. Didn't think to take pictures, so I'll have to snap a few next time I venture out there, then I'll post them here for your comment.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Well, to be exact, bamboo does have phloem and xylem layers, but without bark, it is hard to scratch down to find the inner phloem as it is in plants such as trees.

As long as it is the same colour as before the cold, it is doing fine.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Took a few pics, and chose the best two to post here.

The culms look pretty much the same as when I covered them last Fall. The main culms are sort of olive green, and the smaller "offshoots" have a reddish cast to them.

Panda

A close-up shows where I scraped the culm to reveal a lighter green area, which looks too washed out in this photo:
Panda culm

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Hmmmm.... Most of the leaves in the first photo are dead. There's a few that look like there might be some moisture in them(kind of hard to tell) on the lower limb out to the right.

The culm doesn't look good either, but then I didn't see it before you covered it last year. However, all isn't lost even if all of this is dead. Remember, the roots are cold hardy to several degrees colder, so you will have to wait and see.

Now you know why I keep a division in a pot. It gives me another plant to try again the following year, and it gives it a chance to get some more size to it which makes it a bit more cold hardy.

Looks like it dried out. Did it have plenty of moisture during the icey spells?

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Most of the leaves in the first photo are dead.
I didn't expect any leaves to survive the winter. I was under the impression that every year's growth of leaves would fall off, just as deciduous shrubs do here.

I can very well understand and expect some or all of the culms to perish over winter, but if some of the culms DO happen to survive, do they send out new side shoots with new leafy growth?

One thing about resizing the files of photos, is that they lose some clarity, and I think that adds to the shriveled look of the culms. Also, the color, especially of the second photo isn't true, maybe because the automatic flash fired. The culm that I scraped isn't that brown looking. It's more of a dark yellow-green, and the spot that I scraped away is a lighter yellow-green, not white, like the photo shows.

(Listen to me, grasping at hope that the culm is still alive.)

Thanks for reminding me about the possibility that even if all top growth is lost, there's still hope for the roots.

As far as keeping another division in a pot, I would think that would be harder up here, because a pot above ground would be more vulnerable to freezing, unless I kept it in the garage...my luck, I'd probably run it over with my SUV.

Did it have plenty of moisture during the icey spells?
Pray tell me how in the world would I water dear Panda when it's below freezing, and the ground is frozen? The water wouldn't reach the roots, but instead form a miniature ice-skating rink around said Bamboo...for mice with tiny skates, maybe?

We had plenty of Fall rains and lots of snow cover that has all melted by now, so I feel confident the roots at least have plenty of moisture.

One thing that comes to mind about the dried out look that you mentioned, is that some of the upper Oak leaves have blown out, perhaps exposing the tops of the culms, thus drying them out. (I'm just shootin' in the dark here, can't you tell?)

Oh, poor Panda, what a severe test it's going through. Nothing I can do now, but continue to wait.

Thanks for your observation and comments!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

...do they send out new side shoots with new leafy growth?

Yes, they will grow new limbs and new leaves from the surviving part of the culm. Topping a culm, whether intentionally or by freezing, will make the plant bushier/thicker.

Yes, a potted bamboo is more vulnerable to cold if left outside. It would have to be inside a greenhouse, or inside your house.

...tell me how in the world would I water dear Panda when it's below freezing?

I thought about that as I was asking it, but here, we just wait a few hours, and even frozen ground will thaw out, so I thought maybe you Yanks new some secret to keeping them moist while being frozen.;)

It's still early to tell. I would recommend though, that when it does start to thaw out(the ground) make sure the ground doesn't dry out, since the roots will start to grow almost as soon as the ground thaws, and you don't want to lose Panda after making it this far.

Good Luck and keep me posted. I find it interesting and can't wait to see some new growth(thinking positive).

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Topping a culm, whether intentionally or by freezing, will make the plant bushier/thicker.
Now that's a good thing! I already know that works with shrubs.

Someday I'd love to have a greenhouse, but heating a greenhouse in this climate would be expensive. We're hoping to buy a camping trailer anyway.

I thought maybe you Yanks knew some secret to keeping them moist while being frozen.
Very funny, Tex!
Our aim up here is to KEEP the ground frozen, and not let it go through freeze/thaw cycles, thus heaving plants right out of the ground. I think I've mentioned that before, and that's why we mulch the ground after it freezes, in order to keep it from thawing too soon.

I will take your wise advice at heart and watch Panda closely in Spring, and make sure it gets plenty of moisture. It wouldn't hurt to remind me again, say in March, because we get fierce drying winds then.

Thanks;)!!!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I noticed today at work, one of our shade trees is budding out...and it's only Feb. 9th!

Crazy weather here. I don't even care about cold or heat anymore...all I want is rain rain rain...

Kt


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Drought

OMG!

Are you in the brown or red area?!?!?

U.S. Drought Monitor


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Going by that chart, I'm in the D2 area right next to the D3.

Very dry. Prediction of rain this evening, but no one has their hopes up.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Good grief!
Severe drought, next to extreme drought.

It must feel like a dust bowl there. I hope your well holds out. With all that sprinkling you do, plus drawing enough water for yourself, your household, and your animals, you must have a very deep well!

Hope you get rain soon, and lots of it!

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

My well here is less than 100 feet deep and I check it everyday to be sure water is going to the water troughs for my cattle. My tank is dry so that is all the water they have. If my well goes out...well I don't know what I'll do.

My electric bill was over $300 last month, the highest ever. A normal bill here would be between $95 and $185, depending on the time of year.

We see a lot of cattle and horses with eye irritation from dust. Hay is very scarce since little to none was made all last year. I'm feeding hay from the year before.

Funny thing...the hay that I am feeding, at least in a normal year, I wouldn't feed since it is tough and not the best quality, however, it is better than what people are buying here now which looks like nothing but weeds, but their livestock has to eat something.

I have already seen several people turn their cows out along country roads for a few hours at a time, to eat what little is there. One of my neighbours even turns his cattle in his yard every couple of weeks to eat what little green grows there.

Hoping for rain tonight when the front comes through.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I'll bet the general public has no idea what you ranchers go through from year to year, not knowing when and if the rains may come...not knowing if there will be enough "quality" feed available, not knowing what market prices will be, and a host of other things that I, as a midwesterner can't even imagine will or will not happen.

I'd guess that most people take it for granted that the grocery stores and meat markets will always be stocked full with their favorite cuts of meat, no matter what happens to the ranchers.

In years past, I used to throw out all left overs. Now, I save and freeze that last section of a steak or roast until I have enough for beef stew, or some other tasty dish.

But I'm getting off topic.

I will offer up prayers for rainfall for you, along with Bob and Terramadre.
(I promise not to pray for a hurricane, though;)

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Thanks for your prayers. Looks like we are in for some heavy winds in the next hour or so. Just talked to some folks outside of austin and they had a little rain, hail, and high winds.

I promise not to pray for a hurricane...

The last four hurricanes didn't even give us any rain even though some predictions were for up to 14 inches.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Well, I thought I posted this on a different thread, but am not finding it now. I guess I must not have hit "submit." I hate it when I do that.
Anyway, I was at the (sort of) local zoo yesterday, and was paying attention to the various bamboo that they have. One of the kinds was whacked off 2 or 3 feet above the ground, but they had a different kind that I haven't noticed before this time. Most of the specimens of it had dry leaves, but one sheltered area had plants with green leaves. I was really tempted to cut off a small piece and root it, but I resisted the temptation.
-Jmcat


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Watered most of the weekend while I was off. Chance for rain this week.

Some of my potted bamboos are putting up shoots and the in-ground bamboos are showing signs of new leaf growth.

Supposed to get to about 32F Friday morning...we'll see. Any more promising signs from Panda?

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Chance for rain this week.
It would be great if Bob's rainy storm would travel east and a little south, and dump some drenching rain in your area. Instead, the weatherman tells us it's all coming our way. However, they won't commit to how much rain there will be or if it will turn to mostly snow. The last report was that it will now center north of us, so we may only get 1-3" of snow. That's just fine with me...I've had my share of shoveling for this winter. Northern WI has some abnormally dry areas similar to where you are.

I don't know anyone as diligent as you are when it comes to watering, especially carrying buckets long distances. You sure are getting your exercise!

Some of my potted bamboos are putting up shoots and the in-ground bamboos are showing signs of new leaf growth.
Oh, how exciting that must be! I love to see new buds and shoots of every plant on my property. But February here is still a dormant time for everything outside. I did, however witness new growth on my houseplants upstairs, since they're now getting more daylight hours. If I get time in the next few days, I photograph a couple of them.

Panda is still asleep, I'm sure. If you visited the north for a season, you'd go crazy waiting to see new growth, since you're used to a longer growing season.

I've gotten all my garden lists, plant lists, maps and photos transfered to my external hard drive (that was quite a project, since I had let it go so long), and now I've been researching new daylilies and hostas to purchase for the 2009 season. So far I have 7 pages of internet photos of 111 new daylilies that I have to narrow down to about 50. (another long process) I also need about 13 new hostas, which I haven't found pics of yet, but need to before the end of Feb, so I can get a discount of 20% from a Hosta nursery here in WI.

Here I am babbling about daylilies and hostas, and you're prob'ly thinking, "How many new bamboo cultivars have you researched?" Might think about that if Panda makes it through it's first brutal winter. One of these days I'll post the map of the future Panda bed with circles marked for future companion plants for the bamboo. I just tried to load the map from my hard drive to my laptop, but the @#$*&% Vista program won't read the files! I think I have to upload Microsoft Excell onto this laptop in order to read my maps.

How are all your precious bamboos faring through your drought conditions?

Julie


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map

Just moved to desktop computer w/XP (more user friendly!...reads files from ext hard drive just fine.)

Here's my Green Panda bed plan:

Photobucket

Each square represents one square foot. G. Panda isn't that big yet, but I'm leaving room for expansion.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Ooooohhhhh! All those little circles are great areas for little ground cover bamboos!

Yes, you left a good sized area for the Panda to expand and grow and also leaving room for companion plants. You put a lot of work into you garden areas...very nice.

I can't grow hostas here, at least not easily. There are a few varieties that grow, but they are rare.

One thing that I found out many years ago(about all plants), is that when they are listed as hardy to a certain zone, it doesn't mean they will grow there. There are several plants over the years that I have tried and are well hardy to my area but hardiness ratings don't include all factors such as heat, humidity, sun intensity, day length, etc. Cold hardy ratings are just for cold hardiness and nothing else, even if the cold doesn't kill them, something else surely can.

How are all your precious bamboos faring through your drought conditions?

Here at my house they are mostly doing OK. I am limited to how much time I have for watering during the week, so they have suffered some, but overall look alright. I lost a lot of culms in the giants, but the plants are still alive.

Out at my place in the country, I watered heavily again Sunday, but I'm afraid that I have lost a couple of plants so far, although bamboo is very resilient so I won't give up until late Spring if I don't see any growth by then. Sometimes the above ground plant looks completely dead, and sometimes it is, but then it unexpectedly starts to grow from underground.

What upsets me most, is that even with the low to mid 20F temps we had several times this year, some of the tender boos did very well, but it's the drought that's killing them. These are some of the giants(potential max height 120 feet and 14 inch diameter culms) and even though they would never reach that size here, even half that would be amazing, so keeping these from freezing at least two or three years in a row would produce some monsters.

Here's a site that might help with Hosta ID's. I may have showed it to you before. You can click on the photos of any particular plant for a larger view.

Plant Delights Nursery

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

All those little circles are great areas for little ground cover bamboos!
It figures you'd be thinking bamboo "companions"!
Most of Panda's companions will be Daylilies in that bed, with maybe three hostas in the front, a couple balloon flowers, Rudbeckias, and one or two purple cone flowers. All of those plants are tough for this climate. The ground has been prepared (I think I mentioned that last fall) with newspapers smothering the grass, and a thick layer of woodchips/compost over the paper. I can plant directly into the ground come Springtime.

Yes, I'm familiar with Plant Delights Nursery. I have ordered from them in past years. Lately I've been ordering more plants from Northern nurseries, since their plants have been more acclimated to our winters.
There is one N. Carolina nursery I love to order from though. Mariettas offers excellent daylilies shipped in great condition...large and healthy, with bonus plants, often one or two of their newer introductions.

Yes, I hear hostas are sometimes hard to grow in the deep South, even though most are listed as hardy in zones 3-8. I bet you'd only be able to grow them in deep shade, and they would need a LOT of water in your heat!

Sorry to hear that you may have lost a couple bamboos out at your country place. (Maybe not though.) Do you have divisions of them in your greenhouse? Oh, I've often wondered, since bamboo can get quite tall, how do you store them in your greenhouse if the plants are taller than the ceiling of your greenhouse?

You mentioned some of your "giants" can get to 14" diameter, but probably not in your location. What monsters, indeed! So where in the world to they grow that tall and fat? China? Australia?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Do you have divisions of them in your greenhouse?

Unfortunately, this was a rare case where I did not have divisions kept in pots. Two, are bamboos with thorns, and never do very well during Winter in a greenhouse. They would have been fine if only I could have kept them watered, or if we would have gotten at least a little rain.

...how do you store them in your greenhouse...

Well, most only grow 12 to 15 feet in pots, so when the nights start getting cooler usually the beginning of September, I top the plants, and leave them outside til I eventually put them in my greenhouses around December 1...give or take. By that time, they have put on more leaves and have adjusted to losing the tops of the culms. My greenhouses are only about 8 feet at the highest points.

As you have seen, some of my potted bamboo is over 20 feet tall. If it doesn't get real cold, I just lay them down at night and sometimes cover them with blankets or paper or cardboard. On really cold nights, I put them in my long greenhouse laying down. Not easy when the plants and pots together weigh close to 100 pounds. Then I have to remove them on warmer days to water them...and repeat as necessary.

It's like taking care of a pet! I must be crazy.

So where in the world to they grow that tall...

All over the world. Yes, China and Australia are two excellent places for large bamboo among other countries. Costa Rico and other South American countries are good for bamboo.

Here in the USA, California and Florida have some huge giants. Deep south Texas, Harlingen, is a good place but it ocassional gets cold enough to harm less hardy plants.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

If it doesn't get real cold, I just lay them down at night and sometimes cover them with blankets or paper or cardboard. On really cold nights, I put them in my long greenhouse laying down. Not easy when the plants and pots together weigh close to 100 pounds. Then I have to remove them on warmer days to water them...and repeat as necessary.

I got worn out just reading that!

It's like taking care of a pet!
No, more like a zoo caretaker!

I think I've said this before, but it's a good thing your well is deep! Pray that your well pump holds up!

When our well pump went out late last summer, we were able to hook into our neighbor's holding tank, but only used water for bathing/cooking. I didn't do any laundry during those few days, and I didn't water my gardens. Lost a few things, but was thankful for helpful neighbors.

Goodness, you must be watering plants in your dreams!

Julie


 o
RE: Bamboo Thread Two

 o
RE: Bamboo Thread Three

How's Panda?

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

Bamboo Valley in Oregon...I didn't know you could climb bamboo shoots (culms?)

Browsed the site a little, and learned that the clumpers form more of a bush-like shape, often with "weeping" branches (culms?), esp. the ones that have smaller diameters (3/4" or less.) I like that kind of look more than the upright. Although, I'm sure the upright runners would look fantastic in a grove. My interest, though would be the smaller clumpers that would behave themselves and be nice companions to perennials.

The American Hemerocallis Society sends me quarterly magazines (really called Journals), and in the Summer '08 volume were pictures of tour gardens of the '08 National Convention in Texas. The owners of the gardens listed companion plants and other interesting garden features. One of the gardens in Pearland, TX lists bamboo as a companion plant, although they don't say what kind...I'm sure it would have to be a clumper of some kind.

The map I posted before (which is now gone because of my massive Photobucket clean-up) has now been filled up with daylilies and a few hostas that I have on order. I originally had planned to add some Balloon flowers, Purple cone flowers, and Rudbeckia, but changed my mind, and deleted them from my plan, in order to buy more daylilies for the bed (addiction problem.)

It looks as if Bamboo Valley is located in zone 8, much warmer than here, and I see they speak Japanese.
Cool site!

How's Panda?
Still asleep, I'm sure. I don't dare remove any more leaves at this point. Right now, the top few leaves are exposed to the elements, because I disturbed them a while back to investigate the culms.

March can be a nasty month, (It's STILL winter, you know) and we get very windy. stormy conditions, so Panda must stay snuggled up at least for another month. I figure mid-April is a good time to start uncovering. The ground certainly is getting enough moisture, in fact too much, as far as my already-saturated yard in concerned. It's supposed to rain all weekend:(

I have just the opposite feelings that you have, regarding rain. Too much moisture in the ground keeps me from walking in my gardens to do any clean-up. I don't dare venture onto the ground for fear of compacting the soil around/on top of the plants. And of course if the ground is too muddy for the farmers, they simply can't get into the fields to prepare (till, disc, spray) the soils for planting...resulting in a shorter growing season.

Are your bamboo plants surviving, with all your diligent watering?

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I haven't complained about it raining since the drought of 1996. A total of 8 inches in 14 months, normal being around 40 inches in 12 months. Since then, we have had 2 extremely wet years, including two years ago when we had over 70 inches in 12 months.

Four-wheel drive stayed kicked in full time, but not a single word about it being too wet. I can deal with water, but not lack of.

I dug some divisions from some of my more rare and expensive plants yesterday from out at the country and brought them home. I have several more to go...maybe this weekend. The rest will eventually die...sigh. My tank is about dry there, fish are probably already dead.

Wellman will be out next week to assess the drilling spot I picked. I wanted two wells drilled, but will only get one for now, and it still may be 2 months.

The other drillers would take even longer since they have a backlog of wells to do also. 84F today and the wind has been relentless, especially for this time of the year. Blows gusts up to 40mph from the north one day, then 30mph from south the next...day after day...very strange, but it is drying everything out even faster.

Here at my house I am able to keep everything watered as long as my well doesn't run dry. If so, cattle will be in trouble. Plants are alive but look terrible. Worst my yard has ever looked.

Spoke with one of my brothers today and he will be selling all cattle at our Lone Oak place due to lack of water and NO hay. I have some cows there and told him to sell them also. I say 'sell' but we are just giving them away since prices are so low.

I have hay here for 6 weeks, that is if I really stretch it out.

Sorry to sound like a whiner, but with this drought affecting everyone here, it's all anyone talks about since it is affecting everyone's livelihood, and everytime the president shows his face on TV, the stock market takes a sharp dive, so everyone's life savings are drying up also.

Nothing to look forward to.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I know, I shouldn't complain about too much rain either, because one of these years, it will be our turn. The native plants seem to survive drought conditions better than any cultivars. At least the native plants go to seed, and the seeds can remain in the ground for many years, until conditions are right for germination.

Our cultivars need our help for continued survival. It sounds like you're doing the wise thing, at least saving divisions of your most expensive bamboos. You must have unending energy...that's got to be backbreaking work!

Good news about your wellman, at least getting the process started. Yes, I understand what hot, drying winds can do to foliage and flowers...rips them to shreds, topples plants that aren't staked, topples plants.

I'm so sorry to hear about your hay situation. Can you buy it from other locations? Seems to me, I remember years back, some of the mid-western farmers sent hay to drought-stricken areas.

I don't want to talk about the Prez, or the stock market (a sore spot with me, since I've lost a lot too.)

Nothing to look forward to.
I can't even claim to imagine what you're going through, since I've never been in your type of situation.

However, you seem like the kind of man that is a survivor, no matter what happens, even if you take losses. No matter how bleak the situation is, or if you see no relief in the future, I have confidence you will make your way through this. God doesn't put us through any situation we can't handle, and if the circumstance appears hopeless, HE will carry us through.

Hang in there, cowboy, and don't ever give up hope!

Julie;)


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

We bought hay from Wisconsin in 1996, and I know a man in Colorado that irrigates his hay so he has some available when the time comes.

There is hay being bought and sold down here like crazy, but it is very expensive and is nothing but trash. No protein.

God and I came to an understanding many years ago. I made my peace with him. I've come to see that he has a wonderful sense of humour, although sometimes it may be years before I can look back and laugh about something that I don't understand now.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I could talk for a long time on the topic of "God's ways", but here is not the place for me to ramble on and on and on. All I know is, His ways are "above" us.

Back to the topic of Bamboo, just for kicks, I sent an e-mail question to the Master gardener program at the UW Extension office, asking if anyone grew bamboo, and if so, what kind. Also asked for some horticulture tips on bamboo care, etc. (I didn't tell them I already have one.)

The person that responded to my question was only a little helpful. You gave me much better advise.

Here's her response:

I have bamboo in my garden ... full sun, clay soil, minimal watering in summer. It is 8-9 years old and I can not remember where it purchased it nor what the cultivar is. I have noticed that it is very invasive
and the plumes do not develop for 3-4 years after planting. I have heard that you can plant the grass in a large pot, dig the pot in the area that you wish leaving the pot 2" above the soil.

It has become very messy during the winter. It sheds it long blades and they blow everywhere. I have thought about cutting it down in Nov. but then I would lose the winter interest.

It takes about 5 years before the shoots become strong enough to be used as stakes but they are great to use in the garden.

It sounds as if she has a runner, not a clumper, and some variety that can take full sun. It also sounds like she doesn't over-winter it with any special protective covering.

A couple of Q's for you...

What do you think she means by ...sheds...long blades? Is she refering to the leaves dropping?

And what are the plumes...?
Are those some kind of flower?

She also gave me the names of a couple of local garden centers where I can call and ask what kinds of Bamboos they sell. Well, I already did that last year, and those people are clueless as to how to care for bamboo. They don't know anymore than what's printed on the attached plant tags.

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

What she has is Arundo Donax...not a bamboo at all.

True bamboo has no plumes, and the leaves are small, at least on cold hardy bamboos.

The leaves on A donax are long and slender. The culms resemble bamboo with the nodes and can get to about 1 1/2 inches in diameter and here it grows to about 22 feet tall. There are different varieties, so she may have a subspecie.

Here are some pics. The first two are of a variety of sugar cane. The last two are Arundo donax.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

OMG!!!

You could tell just by her description?!?!?

So what she has is a sort of Giant Reed then.

And she's supposed to be a master gardener?
I suppose I should send her a reply, and mention that Bamboos don't have plumes, and leaves are small. etc.
I wonder if she would be offended.

Geeze, I feel like a lone bamboo grower here in Racine county. I may still try and contact someone from the Racine Garden Club. I have their pamphlet from last summer's garden walk. See what they might know.

Thanks for your expert advice!!!!
And thanks for taking the time to post those pics;)

Julie


 o
more confusion here....

I happened to find this site, and the word plumes is used in a description of a clumping bamboo. You can read it in the first paragraph:

...They have gracefully arching plumes of dark green, feather-like leaves, draping from a tight cluster of culms.

So, I'm wondering if some vendors are describing bamboos wrong? I think of a plume as something fluffy, but I guess others consider a plume as anything that resembles a feather, whether fluffy or not.

Julie, left in a state of confusion...


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I guess you could decribe them as plumes, but my definition of a plume is something separate from the leaves of the plant, as in the last of the photos that I posted above. That is a plume, right?

Different parts of the country describe different parts of plants using similar terminology to describe the same thing. So maybe she does have bamboo, but I would like to see what she is describing as plumes.

I wouldn't say she is describing it 'wrong' just different from the norm.

Kt


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

...my definition of a plume is something separate from the leaves of the plant, as in the last of the photos that I posted above.

Exactly! That's how I imagine a plume to look like.

I just sent a reply back to her, asking for a more detailed explanation of the plumes and blades she talked about.

I'll let you know how she responds.

Glad to hear (in the thread on the other side,) you got some decent rainfall for a change;)

Julie


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two

I think the first Bamboo thread is lost.

j


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RE: Bamboo Thread Two


 o
RE: Bamboo Thread Two

bump


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