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Question re Goose Creek tomato

Posted by anney Georgia 8 (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 8, 10 at 10:14

Is Goose Creek a red or pink tomato? Some sites say pink, some say red. Is the skin color yellow or clear?

I'm trying to list the characteristics of all tomatoes I'm growing so I can ID them when I bring them inside. Shape and color as well as where I've planted them will all feed into the equation, but if they get brought in all together and mixed up, it will help to be sure about the color.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Intersting question b'c I find Googe Creek listed in both the red and pink sections of the SSE YEarbook, the pink being described as an 8-12 oz, shape not mentioned, but the red being described by one person as a small red salad tomato and another person dwscribing it as an 8-10 oz globe.

When I look at Google images I see various shapes but it's impossible to tell the colors.

Laurel was the first to sell plants of Goose Creek with seeds given to her by Jimmy Williams and I cut and pasted part of her description below:

(Goose Creek, a stunning, deeply red fruit, round or slightly flattened, sometimes lobed, with occasional gold streaks or speckling, faintly visible in the photo. Juicy, very sweet and intensely tomatoey as if injected with concentrated tomato flavor, it is ambrosial. I've rarely tasted a tomato to compare. Averaging 6-7 ounces, with very few seeds; it has now made my top 3 list.)

The speckling she refers to is no doubt Gold Flecking, a genetic disorder which is also found with Depp's Pink Firefly.

So if it should be red and a slightly flattedned globe of only 6-7 oz then there are a lot of Goose Creeks out there that aren't GC. And if red then the epidermis will be yellow.

I have never grown it and won't be growing it in the future.

Carolyn


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Anney,

I gave up on that years ago--just couldn't handle all the variations and data.

So, what I do is as follows:

1)Each plant gets a plastic label with key information on it
from an indelable marking pen. I staple it to my stakes, with all tags orientated in the same direction. On the
tags are variety name, 78-I-Pot (DTM-Plant type-leaf type),
a large star if I have determined to save seed based on inventory (this gets marked out once that job is done), an H
for hybrid or an O for open pollinated, and if a hybrid I also mark the desease resistance advertised as VFFNT etc.
Now, without taxing my memory, each time I view my plants I learn to identify characteristics through observation and
through repetition it goes easily into memory.

2)When I want to sample for taste I have a nice convenient salt shaker stored by the garden in a can with a plastic lid. Now I can easily relate taste to variety.

3)When I take fruits inside and want to keep them identified (for example to save seed) I mark the fruits with the same indelable pen used to label the plants. No,
the markings haven't croaked me yet, but if you are neat and have good penmanship the letters don't have to be very big, you know! By the way, I eat the tomatoes from which I save seeds and all that goes into the much taxed often prodded data bank for extra reinforcement.

4)And out of all the above comes a collection of personalized opinions about what I want to grow again, what I probably won't, and a whole mess of other conclusions about the various varieties which I hope get more accurate year to year. Now in my 75th year I find myself far from
perfected memory and perception, often suffering from TMI.

5) I'm growing Goose Creek for the first time this year, so
we'll just have to see how it goes!


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

  • Posted by anney Georgia 8 (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 8, 10 at 12:59

Carolyn

I am interested in growing the GC that is somewhat heat-tolerant and very tasty. The description that Laurel gives is the one I want, but I did get the seeds in a trade so will have to see if it can be linked to her description. Thanks for confirming the color confusion. It doesn't seem to matter which color is claimed -- those who describe them say they're delicious, red or pink! But as I say, I want to see if they're heat-tolerant here in Georgia.

Larry

I suppose writing on harvested tomatoes is one SURE way to keep them separate as long as you know what you've picked! I may be reduced to doing that, too, particularly for those whose seeds I want to save.

Let us know how your Goose Creeks turn out, and if they're the same as what Laurel describes.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

I'm growing GC for the first time as well...we shall see!


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

those who describe them say they're delicious, red or pink!

****

Perhaps, but please note I said that some SSE descriptions as well as Google IMAGES indicated different shapes, which I think is most important, as well as different sizes. So the way I see it there could be a lot of wrong GC seeds out there running around.

if it were a simple spontaneous epidermis mutation from yellow (red) to clear ( pink) OK, but the shape should then be the same b'c all that was affected was epidermis color.

You'll find out soon enough. ( smile)

Carolyn, who has linked to a 2004 patent application where Jimmy Williams tried to patent it. You can't patent a variety without a significant gene addition improvement to an OP; the two stage ripening process described is normal for a red fruited variety and there have been several threads elsewhere critiquing this patent application. I also had to do extensive research on this variety as asked to by a magazine that wanted to run an article on the claims William's has made. I'll say no more. ( smile) In the end many would suggest that the most important issue is whether it's a good tasting/producing variety, regardless of other claims made.

Here is a link that might be useful: Goose Creek Patent Application


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

anney,

I've grown them for 3 years now, and I echo what Laurel's site claims. Goose Creek is my #1 favorite tomato.

Raybo


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

  • Posted by anney Georgia 8 (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 8, 10 at 15:20

Carolyn

I'll keep my fingers crossed that I have the real magilla seed!

Raybo

That must be some good-tasting tomato!


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RE: Keeping track of tomato data

Concerning "indelible pens": some of them are not so "indelible" in the garden. Sharpie now has a UV-resistant "industrial", super-permanent marker that, so far, seems to work better than the typical marker, I'm suspending my labels (plastic knives) above each variety, on the field fencing we're using for support. I'm using UV-resistant outdoor painter's duct tape.

I'm trying Goose Creek from trade this year, too. Guess we'll see what it's like in a couple of months, if all goes well.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Hi,

I'm growing Goose Creek for the first time this year. I got my seeds from Gleckler Seedmen (http://glecklerseedmen.com/) who describe it as a pink. I was hoping that it would be the same tomato that Raybo and Laurel love.... but maybe not???

Anne


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

CarolynC1
Plastic knives???
BRILLIANT!!!!!!!! And here I have been fussing around with slicing up old yogurt containers. Plastic knives are perfect!

Carla in Sac


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Re forgot

I forgot to ask--is anyone selling seeds of Goose Creek?

Thanks

Carla in Sac


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

  • Posted by anney Georgia 8 (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 8, 10 at 21:08

SM

I've done an internet search and don't see any vendors selling the original seeds. Maybe there will be some available after the tomato season is over.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

I'm growing Goose Creek for the first time this year. I got my seeds from Gleckler Seedmen (http://glecklerseedmen.com/) who describe it as a pink. I was hoping that it would be the same tomato that Raybo and Laurel love.... but maybe not???

*****

Adam Gleckler called me this evening to tell me that someone, whom I know and who reads/posts here at GW, e-mailed him and suggested that what he was offering was not what it should be.

Was it sheer coincidence that the person cited the patent application I linked to above as well as my description of what Laurel said about it?

I don't know. But I advised Adam to delete that variety since it was pink and the original is red, and quite frankly I don't even know if it's a pink version of the original red, due to an epidermis mutation, and there's no way to prove that so I suggested he delete that offering.

And he offered that the pink was a great tasting variety, and I believe him.

But my stance has always been that it's best to list varieties that match the original description of the variety.

And those of you who read the orginal threads here about Gleckler's being back in business know that I and others were so pleased about that that I spearheaded an effort at another message site and asked for donations of seeds of varieties that in many cases were rare and/ or hard to get.

And that's why Adam called me.

Carolyn


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

I grew Goose Creek in 2006 and 2007 from seeds that CoronaBarb sent me from California. She got her seeds from Jimmy. Both years I grew Goose Creek the tomatoes were pink with clear epidermis.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

All the Goose creek seeds that I have grown over the past few years are descended from the original seeds of it I obtained from Laurel-( She does not normally sell seeds to anyone, but because I live in the UK where importing plants is out of the question-she sent me seeds as a special favor, in an exchange deal).

So all the Goose creek seeds that I have saved over the years from that original stock, and sent out to lots of people since then, are all from some of Laurel's original stock-and a darned good tomato it is too-very reliable and consistant production.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Of the 10 goose creek seeds that I received, only one germinated (compared to 85% average success for the dozens of other varieties of seeds that I tried). The one that did germinated got reduced to a stem in the brutal hailstorm we had in June 2008. It came back, and I bagged a few flowers to save seeds. The tomatoes on the plant were very slightly flattened globes, but because the plant got such a late re-start due to the hail damage only a few fruits ripened (seemed to have a pretty long days-to-maturity compared to others). Seeds saved from bagged blossoms also did not germinate so well, and produced tomatoes that were large, and what I would say were bell-shaped and leaning towards red/orange in colour. Took forever to mature. Flavour was not great. I assume that the original seeds that I received were either saved from a non-bagged parent, or the one that germinated was not actually goose creek (maybe was a hybrid of some sort). Sure was a lot of work for a very poor result.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

I grew Goose Creek in 2006 and 2007 from seeds that CoronaBarb sent me from California. She got her seeds from Jimmy. Both years I grew Goose Creek the tomatoes were pink with clear epidermis.

*****

Now that interests me Hoosier b'c when I was doing that research for that magazine article Goose Creek at that time was a large pink and mostly smooth, and the resaon I remember that is b'c for the time period specificed by Jimmy there were no large smoothish pink fruited varieties.

I double checked with Andrew Smith at the time and he agreed.

But when Laurals description and the patent application both specified a medium red I had forgotten what I had known from years ago, so thanks for reminding me.

Two questions for you.

First, I was led to believe that Jimmy wasn't giving out seed or selling them although I can understand Laurel sending some seed to Michael in the UK. I think at one time when Laurel introduced it she had said something about the association she had made with Jimmy and that the only way to get Goose Creek was via plants from her.

But of course it being OP it would be expected that folks who saved seeds from her plants would share them with others.

And if there are two different colors and shapes out there and had been from the get go, maybe, although I only remember the large pink, it tends to explain folks growing both large pink and smaller reds for this variety that I saw with Google IMAGES as well as the same variety being listed in both the pink and red sections of the SSE YEarbooks.

What's your sense of where we are with this variety now as to two colors and two shapes and sizes?

Lastly, if you were me, ahem, based on the fact that Adam was sent the large pink that I do now remember do you think I should advise him to keep it in his listings, especially since Barb got her seeds directly from Jimmy, in some way, sent you some, and you also got a large pink?

Carolyn, who can't go back and dig out her e-mail exchanges with that magazine or with Andy Smith b'c that was a hard drive or so ago and this hard drive has e-mails only back to April of 2005.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

  • Posted by lee_ NC-7 (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 9, 10 at 9:27

Here's a photo of GC from Tomatopalooza[tm] V.
Hard to tell exactly from the photo, but if memory serves,
I believe these were pink.

Lee


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

  • Posted by anney Georgia 8 (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 9, 10 at 9:44

Now, the big question is whether the fruits for Goose Creek can be both pink and red. If so, does that not mean that the line is not stabilized yet? We've seen other unstabilized lines of tomatoes, one apparently being Sungold Select II having red and gold tomatoes in the line that will show up in different plants.

Could Jimmy have tried to patent an unstable variety, thinking it was a unique two-stage plant ("dual ripening stages") when in fact it was simply different genetic expressions of the plants, one with red fruit and one with pink fruit and maybe additional characteristics, harking back to the parents, not two stages of the same plant? Yet that isn't the description of the difference in the patent documents:

...a tomato line, designated Goose Creek, that has a novel dual-ripening characteristic. ....The characteristics described below were found to be present in the Goose Creek tomato line, which is uniform and stable for all traits. The Goose Creek tomato line comes true to seed.

[0017] The Goose Creek tomato line is an indeterminate growth type with long, medium-wide, semi-erect, bipinnate leaves. The leaves are medium green in color and have a medium level of glossiness. Leaf blistering is weak with small-sized blisters. The inflorescences are mainly multiparous with pubescence of style (hair) present. The flowers themselves are yellow in color and the plant exhibits early flowering. There is no abscission layer in the peduncle. The fruit vary in size, with both small and medium fruit present on the same plant. The ratio of length to diameter in the fruit is medium, and the shape of the fruit in longitudinal and cross section is round. There is weak ribbing of the fruit at the peduncle end and a medium depression present in the fruit at the peduncle end. The scarring on the fruit includes a medium peduncle scar and a small blossom scar. At the blossom end the fruit shape is flat.

[0018] The cross section of the core of the fruit is medium in thickness as compared to the total fruit diameter and the thickness of the pericarp is also medium. The fruit generally has 4, 5, or 6, locules. The fruit has a light green shoulder prior to maturity, and a light-green overall color at stages prior to maturity.

[0019] The fruit has an unusual characteristic of two distinct stages of ripeness with fruit at the first ripe stage having characteristic green shoulders and an orange coloration on the remainder of the fruit. At the second ripe stage the fruit have a characteristic overall red color. The fruit are edible at both ripe stages. The fruit in the first ripe stage exhibits a medium to firm texture with a citrus-like, fruity flavor. The fruit in the second ripe stage exhibits a soft to medium firmness and is higher in juice and Brix (sugar) content than is present in fruit at the first ripe stage. Thus, the fruit can be harvested at either of two different stages to yield the unique appearance, texture, and flavor properties characteristic of ripeness at each stage.

OR was Jimmy's description correct, at least about the fruits having two colors, and people are listing it with only one color indicated?

Has anyone grown both versions of Goose Creek to check it out?

[In the end, I still want the GC tomato that tastes wonderful and has better heat-resistance than most tomatoes in this Georgia heat. But it seems some confusions need to be cleared up before I can be assured of that!]


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

  • Posted by whgille Oakland, FL-Zone 9B (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 9, 10 at 10:11

Hi All

I am not a tomato expert, but just a hobby tomato grower.:o) I grew both kinds described of Goose Creek, I am not naming sources because I don't want to get in trouble,lol.

The first time I grew the red variety from seeds saved by me, and I love the taste and the production.

Photobucket

Last season, I got seeds from another tomato grower and they were also named the same variety, his was pink like described and also taller than mine.

I am growing in my garden now Goose Creek, like the red variety compact bush.

Photobucket

Silvia


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

"What's your sense of where we are with this variety now as to two colors and two shapes and sizes? Lastly, if you were me, ahem, based on the fact that Adam was sent the large pink that I do now remember do you think I should advise him to keep it in his listings, especially since Barb got her seeds directly from Jimmy, in some way, sent you some, and you also got a large pink?" [Carolyn]
---------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------

As to "where we are with two colors," I can only answer that I got pink tomatoes that look just like the pink tomatoes in the pictures posted above by both Lee and WHGille. Same shape. Same sizes. Same color. Same soft texture. Nothing to write home about.

I wouldn't describe it as "large pink," rather a medium size, smooth, elongated globe ranging from 4 - 6 ounces or so.

Can't remember details now, but I think Barb said she got the seeds out of tomatoes she bought from Jimmy, but I could be suffering from CRS in that regard. I could look up the note she sent with the seeds, but would rather take a walk down to the river and enjoy the beautiful spring weather right now.

Bill


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Can't remember details now, but I think Barb said she got the seeds out of tomatoes she bought from Jimmy, but I could be suffering from CRS in that regard. I could look up the note she sent with the seeds, but would rather take a walk down to the river and enjoy the beautiful spring weather right now.

Bill

*****

Don't bother looking b'c I think you're probably right about Barb buying the fruits he was selling b'c for many years he did sell tomatoes, including his named Goose Creek, along I think with some other veggies and fruits at a Farmer's Market.

And whatever Barb does she does right as far as tomatoes go. I don't know if you know that she and I were both Moderators at another site for a while and then she and I and RIley, the tech person left at the same time. I also met Barb when I was in CA for that Hortus Nursery dealie at Pasadena and in Orange County and it was in Orange that she showed up as I recall.

Anney, as I mentioned above, yes, it's possible for a red to mutate to a pink and vice versa with a single epidermis mutation, but that doesn't explain all that's been written above.

And Jimmy had said he'd grown it for years so at least in his mind it was stable and he went farther and suggested it was stable from the get go in the what, late 1700's, I can't remember the exact date now. And to try to file a patent application on a tomato variety demands that a variety be gtenetically stable, but of course one can't do so with an heirloom, but maybe he didn't know that and was jsut trying to protect some finance related issues in terms of income. Who knows.

Barb would have gotten those seeds from the fruits before Jimmy ever associated with Laurel, back near 1999 to 2000, I think.

But, I can contact Barb directly and ask her thru contact at another website.

Anney, no, I don't think that the patent application that I linked to and you cut and pasted from, is suggesting that his first stage is anything other than the normal ripening sequence that one would expect with a red tomato.

So why did he switch to a red from the original pink? I can't help but wonder if it had anything to do with the comments I sent back to that magazine. First, I never knew if they ran the article and second, I have no idea if they showed him my comments saying that both Andy Smith and myself had said that there were no known large pink, for that's what it was, maybe 8-12 oz as someone who lsits the pink stills says, and that's why he went to a red.

Gotta love tomato histories. LOL

And at this point I think the pink is more valid than the red.

Carolyn, who still has a few searches to do but no time now.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Anyone think it's remotely possible that Jimmy ran out of Goose Creek tomatoes one day at the Farmers Market and substituted Bradley tomatoes for the rest of the day? Just thinkin' out loud ...


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Here's what I hope I will have. From Laurel's:

This delectable historical family heirloom is one of the rarest plants we offer and our #1 top seller. The flavor and color run deep in Goose Creek , a stunning, deeply red fruit, round or slightly flattened, sometimes lobed, with occasional gold streaks or speckling, faintly visible in the photo. Juicy, very sweet and intensely tomatoey as if injected with concentrated tomato flavor, it is ambrosial. I've rarely tasted a tomato to compare. Averaging 6-7 ounces, with very few seeds; it has now made my top 3 list.

This family treasure comes to us from edible landscape expert, Jimmy Williams, owner of Hayground Organic Gardening in California whose home garden we found to be an enchanting escape. Jimmy, born in 1942, and his Native Island Gullah-Geechee family are descendants of slaves brought in bondage from The Caribbean to the coastal islands of the Southern United States to grow rice for plantation owners.

The Gullah are still keepers of a fascinating culture of food, language and beloved traditions--a most extraordinary and delightful people.

The seeds of this sublime fruit have been passed down through generations since the 1800's when Jimmy's great-great grandmother, a young Caribbean slave, smuggled them with her aboard ship. When the ship docked at Charleston near Goose Creek, South Carolina, she had the treasured seeds with her, hidden deep in her skirt pocket and planted them that first spring. Jimmy's grandmother, Elouise Watson, shared this precious heirloom with him more than 45 years ago, assuring Goose Creek 's place in his family's garden for generations to come. Among its extraordinary qualities: A very high fruit yield and very few seeds.

Along with being very heat tolerant, it shows remarkable cold-tolerance along the cooler coastal areas where the fruits continue to set and ripen through November and December. It is a wonderful choice for growing in containers.

Goose Creek has two distinctly different and superb flavors during two phases of its growth: when partially ripe and still showing some light green at the shoulders it has a brisk citrusy taste balanced with a fine, lingering touch of sweetness, and again at full red ripeness when it develops an intensely rich, earthy sweet flavor and luxurious, silken texture.

Very prolific, this exquisite variety has been featured recently in Fine Cooking Magazine, The Los Angeles Times Magazine,

and Visiting with Huell Howser on PBS. This season it will be featured in Sunset Magazine, Mother Earth News, Weekend Magazine and The Victory Garden on PBS Television.

Now available to the home gardener and online exclusively from Laurel's; it is a rare and exquisite selection for your table and your historical garden.

A perfect gift for the tomato-lover on your list.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Hi,

First, IMHO, I think that Adam should continue to offer his Goose Creek seeds. If Carolyn suspects the pink is the orginal strain and Adam thinks it tastes great, that seems like reason enough to keep it. If there's a conflict in the 2 apparent types, maybe he could label it Goose Creek Pink and Laurel could label what she offers as Goose Creek Red.

BTW, I love glecklerseedmen - good prices, wonderful customer service, and lots of varieties I've read about but had trouble locating all from one source. The fact that he offers Goose Creek seeds (that no one else that I know of offers) is a great incentive to buy from Adam rather than going to a number of different suppliers to get the combination of some of the "harder to find" seeds that one might be looking for.

Assuming that he's still around, it seems like one could just ask Jimmy what color, etc. his orginal Goose Creek was. I could see some awkwardness with Laurel if it was a Pink and, conversely some awkwarness with Adam and others if it was a red. I guess the whole patent issue also complicates things. Maybe it was originally a pink but mutated into the red form that he passed on to Laurel so he'd be right on both counts and not offend anyone???

Anyway, very interesting thread!

Anne


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

It's tomato blasphemy I tell ya! What a crock! Bad enough history doesnt match, now even the shapes & colors don't either!

Hey, let me tell ya bout this Brandywine mater... my great, great, GREAT grandfather Edwin Kornescevswiecz said it tasted better than the stiffest brandy and the finest wine, way, way, WAY back before he even got on board the boat leaving Europe... he ended up in the Wyoming Valley area of northeast PA, the rest is history... well... sorta...


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

But, I can contact Barb directly and ask her thru contact at another website

*****

That's what I said above after Bill said he wanted to go walk along the river rather than searching for his info from Barb.

Barb got back to me and said that she had attended the big Fullerton tomato/pepper sale in 2005 and it was there that Laurel gave her a plant of Goose Creek so the seeds she sent you Bill were seeds aved from that plant.

Since I didn't ask Barb for permission to cut and psste what she said, and since she's occupied elsewhere today I'll just summarize.

She said that the fruits were interesting b'c they were pink with reddish orange shoulders and while she didn't check the epidermis she'd say it was clear ( pink). She said there was a picture of it at another site and I looked but couldn't find it and I think she said she was going to try to find herself.

Here I'm giving the link to a thread that apppeared here in 2008 about Goose Creek:

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tomato/msg1213392125736.html

And below I'm linking to the Google images of Goose Creek. I spent quite a bit of time today with those images trying to get back to the original plaes where they were posted and while It's very difficult to tell color from most of those photos I think everyone can appreciatre the fact that there appears to be no one Goose Creek based just on size and shape and some ribbed, others smooth and interior structure alone, where those were shown.

A couple of folks in this thread have gotten a pink as they posted and Barb, who got her plant directly from Laurel (Barb and I were at one time Mods at the same place where Laurel posted so we three do know each other) also describes hers as a pink but didn't say how those shoulders ripened up.

So at this point I'm willing to say that there is no ONE Goose Creek, viz, there can be either a pink or a red and either can be of variable size and have or not have ribbed shoulders.

At this point I'm going to suggest to Adam Gleckler that he leave his listing for the pink Goose Creek.

Carolyn

Here is a link that might be useful: Goose Creek Google Images


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RE: Plant labels

Yes, Carla, plastic knives work great if you can get smooth-handled white ones (the ones I'm using are Dixie). For crops less rampant than tomatoes, you can print the name on both the top and bottom of the knife and bury the bottom half to protect it from fading in the sun.

For extra plants which I intend to give away, I use plastic spoons marked in the same way. Helps me to keep my own plants separate.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Well, all of this has been interesting but I must comment that I have never seen such a mass of information about what appears to be a fairly normal and unremarkable tomato variety.

The pictures posted so far are certainly not of bragger size, and there exist a plenty of good tasting reds in that size and shape to choose from.

I may just slip this one off on my neighbor where I can still keep an eye on it and if I'd like I am certain I can trade for a sample!

My seed came from Trudi of Wintersown (that selection at my request) and at this point I can only hope it turns out to
be the larger "pink" dealie.

By the way, I have actually been to a town called Goose Creek on several occasions which is north of Charleston, South Carolina. Now to discover that this variety is supposed to have originated from a farmer's market in
California operated by a fellow with an unusual background
makes me wonder.

Oh well, maybe it will be the star of the garden this year.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Mine match Lee's:

Cross Creek 2010


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Hi Gang,

Goose Creek is red. Occasionally some of the fruits will exhibit a pinkish hue with orangey shoulders. Sorta like Anna Russian does. To me it is a red tomato.

If your Goose Creek is pink and beefsteak shaped you do not have Goose Creek.

If your Goose Creek is more than 8 ounces you do not have Goose Creek.

The photograph at Gleckler's is not Goose Creek. Not remotely. He has been bamboozled.

My website description is accurate.

Carolyn's asks re Jimmy: 'So why did he switch to a red from the original pink?'

He didn't.

Carolyn: "I can't help but wonder if it had anything to do with the comments I sent back to that magazine."

He never read it.

Jimmy does not sell fruits or seeds and never has. He sell plants at the Santa Monica and Hollywood Farmer's Markets. If you want to contact him just email me, tomatoplants@pacbell.net and I will put you in touch. He's wonderful guy. Not computer literate, no website.

Carolyn: "So at this point I'm willing to say that there is no ONE Goose Creek, viz, there can be either a pink or a red and either can be of variable size and have or not have ribbed shoulders. "

Nah, only one true variety. Not pink. Not large.

Big Daddy and Lee...I see red tomatoes in your photographs but it's 80 degress and 6 pm in Los Angeles and it's November. It's California after all and I may be hallucinating.

And Sunset's Red Horizon/Rostova is and always has been heart shaped.
:)

We are still picking beautiful ripe tomatoes out here. Carolyn, c'mon over, we'll make BLTs.

Peace Out,

Laurel


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

I grew the med-small round pink variety and it is as good or better than brandywine, prue etc. The color gets deep and dark, but it definitely has a clear epidermis.

Based on the great flavor of this "Pink Goose" I'm not in a big hurry to find the real (red) thing.


As for identifying tomatoes...Sharpie in the garden, write on the fruit.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

And Sunset's Red Horizon/Rostova is and always has been heart shaped.

*****

I don't think so Laurel.

The past two days I've been involved in a series of em's about the variety Rostova and all I'll say is that if you go to the DG plant files you'll find a post by Anioleka, who first offered it on e-bay as well as at their website, from 2003 saying that it was a beefsteak variety.

And if you had read at their site before they closed this past July you'll also have read of their dismay when a heart showed up and said they were going to try and get more of the beefsteak one that Nik had originally brought from the Rostova area of the former USSR to the US.

I grew Rostova, aka Sunset Red Horizon, from an original pack of seeds from Tomatofest that were sent to me and they were superb red beefsteaks and that was true for the first few years that Gary sold them, but then the heart one appeared.

So you can check out the DG plant files to confirm what many of us already knew, and that's that the original Rostova was not a heart.

Carolyn, who stays out of the Goose Creek stuff these days, pretty much, been there, done that, b'c it's been talked about and talked about and Barb's plant from you didn't give red fruits, as noted above. I could write a lot more but have chosen not to. And I'm sincerely hoping that all is going well with you and DH in terms of health and all else. As for me, it's the downward spiral into old age, just having had two cataract surgeries, but now I'm certified to kill Mastodons and Mammoths with a spear should they ever appear again. LOL This from a chat I had with my eye surgeon about the evolution of sight in humans going back to ....if you couldn't see it to kill it you didn't have dinner. LOL


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Carolyn, Old Gal,

You should call Gary for the original info. Email me, I will give you his telephone number. He said he would like to talk to you. My email: tomatoplants@pacbell.net

To go along with Kelly S. re SRH or Rostova in Kelly's current situation may not be productive as you know, given the situation (Dave's Garden for Anioleka seeds aka Rogueland Seeds or heirloom.tomatoes@yahoo.com or all of the Spurling Family's seed selling sites.)

I must tell you that Gary is puzzled why the history of this variety got so turned around... he has always admired you so.

OH, almost fergot! Jimmy's book!

Check it out! "From Seed to Skillet" Jimmy's book is selling like crazy at Amazon. I'm so impressed by his work. You're an author; you would love it! You can see the video at YouTube -- search "From Seed to Skillet". You shoulda met him, C. You would have liked him so much.

Thank you for asking about Terry. He turned 71, I turned 60. We are beaming, blooming, blossoming and loving life. Over the top in love and joy with our 5 grandchildren! Life is good. :)

Dinna be Cross with Me Bonnie Girl-- Kill me a Mastodon, Lass O' the Hollow. You Slay it, I'll Cook it fer ya.

Peace On Ya,

Laurel
Celebratin' me birthday, liftin' a glass to ya.

I stand by my statements about Sunset's Red Horizon.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Gary e-mailed me tonight after you contacted him. He sent his e-mail to me and another person as well.

Ask him to forward my response to you and ask him to give you the link that I gave him.

I also asked him why you hadn't answered me here but now I see you have but I didn't see it b'c I've been busy working on my SSE YEarbook listings today.

Carolyn, old gal ( smile), but same age as Terry.


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RE: Question re Goose Creek tomato

Wonder if I should drop a mischievous banana peel around here for anyone to slip on. Funny thing, I got Sunsets Red Horizon from someone several years ago and it turned out to be a beefsteak.

DarJones


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