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Grub/worm good/bad?

Posted by rj_hythloday 8A (My Page) on
Fri, Oct 24, 08 at 13:34

I have one sunburst tomato that did really well this year, it's still got alot of fruit to ripen. I was digging around the base to put some worm castings near the root system and found two grubs. They were almost clear w/ red on one end. They are bigger than BSFL. About 1" or longer if I was to uncurl it. Are they going to be a problem next year or even this fall?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

Problem with grubs is they attract moles.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

I've got native BSFL in the soil and haven't seen any moles. I'm more concerned that since I found them right up against the base of the tom bush that It might be harmful to next years plants/fruit.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

Scoop them up with a good amount of dirt. Put them into a Ball jar with the dirt. Leave it outside and see what hatches next spring.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

ewwie! lol! if i would have to guess, i would say BAD. mostly because they are icky! lol. hopefully someone else will come along and give a more informed response =)
whenever i see them when i'm digging in the spring, i just chuck them into the street and hope birds would come eat lunch before they crawl away.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

I threw one over the fence hoping the birds would find it and away from my garden a bit. The other I decided I better find out good/bad and left it in the ground.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

GGrub worms pupate into 1 1/2 inch long,extremely irriedescent beetles. I have a pet Oppossum (Penelope) and she thinks they are the greatest thing since sliced bread.I personally have not tasted them so I am just going by her word on them. They don't cause any damage to plants.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

I'm going to dig one up next week and post a pic, It's a much harder shell and definitely different then the regular grubs(BSFL) That I found while dig turning the garden this year.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

Not all grubs morph into Japanese beetles (the iridescent insect critters). Some become other types of beetles. That's why I suggested you overwinter them outside in a jar if you really want to find out what they are. Sorry if Tessa found that suggestion ill informed or "icky."


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

So is there a chance it could be a beneficial? I've got nothing against over wintering some, just don't know what to do w/ the out come.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

Look, I have no idea what beetle your grub will morph into. I know what most of the grubs found in S.W. Indiana lawns will become, and that's Japanese beetles. But I don't even know where you live or what beetles are common there.

Why don't you do a bit of exploring HERE rather than relying on relatively uninformed comments in this thread.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

Thanks for the link, yikes! I don't think I want any scarab beetles in my garden.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

They are good, because grubs are the larval stage of a beetle. All lawns have some grubs. In fact, a good healthy lawn can withstand up to 6 grubs / square foot. Your lawn will be get damaged by grubs if you water more often in late summer and your grass is not deeply rooted.

Here is a link that might be useful: Bio Active Peat


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

I have never heard grubs called good before. They feed off roots, your lawn roots or roots of other plants. They attract undesirable critters. Your lawn can "withstand" a certain number of grubs, that does not mean its good for the lawn. The hatched beetles eat leaves of plants. I have never seen mine eat tomato leaves but they will migrate on your property and choose plants they like an do damage to those. Personally, I kill any I find. I have Japanese, Oriental and Asiatic. I hate every one of them. If they are not munching the lawn as grubs they are decimating my basil, eating my flowers, or making plants leaves look a mess, and even eating enough of the leaves to damage the plants. Mine love my roses and basil the most.

That said, they will not hurt your tomato plants. But they certainly don't do any "Good".

Worms are good. Great in fact. But not grubs. It would take a lot to change my mind about that, lol.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

I don,t think that grubs(some kind of larva) are harmful at that stage. But problem start when they turn into caterpillars, beetles etc.
Moles, eat grubs, that is true but if there are no moles in the area they won't appear suddenly from nowhere. One way to get rid of grubs is to use grub killer. But then you will kill the earthworms too. I would rather not do that.


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RE: Grub/worm good/bad?

Probably a type of scarab beetle which includes the June Beetle, Japanese Beetle, Hercules Beetle, Stag Beetle, etc.

Eating rotting matter...compost, perhaps?

I would remove and relocate or feed to birds (or chickens).

Here is an interesting read: http://ag.arizona.edu/yavapai/anr/hort/byg/archive/whitegrubs.html

Here is a link that might be useful: Stag Beetle Larva


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