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Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

Posted by seysonn 7b WA/HZ 1 (My Page) on
Sat, Dec 7, 13 at 23:34

TOMATOES YOU'LL NEVER PLANT AGAIN:

The original thread got to long. So I decided to start a new fresh thread. The link to the previous thread is shown below.

I think now is the time to pick what we want/plant to grow in 2014, based on your past experience, what you have heard about .... But there can be things that we ALL learn from each other's experience. I find it very helpful when you are about to step into new territories.

So here we go: TOMATOES YOU WILL NOT GROW IN 2014, .. WHY ?
You can also add your "GOT TO HAVE ITs".

ONE MORE THING:
Now that 2013 growing season is history, let us make a report card on how our maters did, if you will.

Here is a link that might be useful: previous

This post was edited by seysonn on Sun, Dec 8, 13 at 7:25


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

In PART ONE. the followings tomatoes were focused more than others that I can recall:

YELLOW PEAR, MR. STRIPY, GREEN ZEBRA, BRANDYWINE, JULIET, ROMA(BER issues),
some BLACK tomatoes were negatively reviewed.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

I had no idea until l visited this thread, that there we SO many different varieties of maters! From what I grew,,,
I will not grow:
Applegate: It was a HUGE plant, but fruit was plum size and thick dark skin.
Roma: Too small to bother with, at least the ones I had were, for the most part. Not too much trouble with BER.
Yellow Pear: Too bland, this plant was given to me. Altho pretty in sauces.

I will grow:
San Marzano: loved it for my sauces, plants were HUGE, but I lost a lot in the beginning of the season to blossom drop. I think DH had too much manure, too soon in the garden.
Siletz: Nice size and good taste and producer. Only complaint on this one is the alien tomatoes that start to grow out the bottom!
Bootie: Great producer, pretty meaty and nice size for slicing. Also great for canning.

I had a cherry tomato seed that came in a pack that it shouldn't have been there, so I have no idea what it was. But it produced heavily all summer long. I would grow it again, as my neighbors handicapped son LOVED them. So I would grow them just for him. So would appreciate knowing of a good variety for this. They were also a nice size, not real small.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

To bring this up:
My own "Zap" candidates are:
== Black Krim. Brandywine, Wild INDET cherry tomatoes that grow like crazy with small fruits. And I don't like the taste of Roma, on top of their BER problem.

== OVERALL, I will not grow any hybrid, except maybe a BETTER BOY, if I find good seedling.

SPACE CONSIDERATION:
For this reason, and also to have more early and mid season varieties, I am looking into more DETS and semi-DETS.

COOLER?shorter season reasons:
Almost same as space problem. Bigger INDETS take usually longer to ripen fruits as they spend considerable energy on growing foliage. But I will have a few late season varieties like Cherokee Purple and Mortgage Lifters.

I am all set to start germinating sometime in February.


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On the Zapped list:

Manitoba = plants produce plenty of slightly larger than golf ball size green tomatoes, but they tend to rot before they fully ripen here in our GA summers.

Black Krim = only got one softball size tomato last year before it died from a combination of blight and what looked like fusarium wilt. It was a nice tasting tomato, though.

On the Keeper list for this year:

Celebrity
Cherokee Purple


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

Green Zebra
Mr. Stripey
Yellow Pear
Green Grape

I'm sure I'm forgetting some.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

I won't bother with Indigo Rose again. The outside ripened so fast to the point where they looked almost black but then it took FOREVER for the inside to ripen. There was no way of knowing when they finally ripened without cutting one open, so over 50% of the time I'd cut one open that looked ripe only to find out it was still green.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

I wasn't thrilled with Indigo Rose either, but in their defence, mine had a small spot on the bottom that turned from green to orange to red, indicating when they were ripe enough to eat. They took a very long time to ripen!

Linda


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

Linda, what did they taste like? Sweet, tangy, meh?


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Will not grow Black Russian "Paul Robeson". Yield way too small and muddy tasting.
Same for Burpee Supersteak Hybrid- yield too small and not sweet enough.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

In line what Surya said:

Most so-called black tomatoes have a texture that is lacking JUICE and their meat is mushy. But I will just grow one for the heck of it (CP). JMO


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I have out in the garden right now, young plants not producing yet:
*Mortgage Lifter
*Brandywine
*Plum Tigris
*Ananas Noire

Could not get seeds of Ivory Egg to germinate.
Also growing hybrid cherry tomato, and they're already producing tons of very good, sweet fruit. Can't remember it's name though. Will see how I like the others in a few months. Have had Brandywine many times before, and love it. I grow mine in raised beds, as Fl. infamous for nematodes.

Based on some of you good folks reccomendations, I'm willing to try Yellow Oxheart, Galina, Cuore di Bue and Viva Italian next fall. I agree with poster mentioning length of growing season, soil types, weather, and when fruits are picked.
Tomatoes are similar to grapes in that way. They pick up the flavors around them, and that's what you get. Give to them, and they give back to you.

This post was edited by MsMorningSong on Sat, Dec 28, 13 at 5:18


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

Deeby,

I replied, but must not have hit "send" so was surprised to not see it here.

The taste was ok, but "different". Quiet sweet but nothing to rave about. Since my IR's didn't grow bigger than cherries, they won't be invited back.

Linda


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IMO 75% of the people who hate Green Zebra are eating it before it is fully ripe. When you Google pics of Green Zebra, half of the pics that people take of harvested fruit are yellow, and the other half are completely unripe (green). I've never seen any other variety of tomato with so many photos of it harvested unripe. Unlike many GWR, which only need a faint yellow blush, Green Zebra needs to turn a deep yellow. If you didn't like Green Zebra because it was sour, astringent, or firm textured, it wasn't the variety. It was because you ate it before it was ripe.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

Thanks, Linda.


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I really didn't like toronjina. An expensive and hard to get orange cherry tomato that got all kinds of rave reviews from other market gardeners. But the ones I grew had thick chewy skins that you couldn't hardly chew up. They split if they got a drop of rain on them or if they got fully ripe. And if you picked them a little under ripe, they didn't ripen up off the vine, they shriveled and became unmarketable. What a disappointment...


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  • Posted by arley 7b/8a SC (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 2, 14 at 22:31

ZAP list: Black Cherry was very productive, but the flavor wasn't particularly great. I liked the flavor of Black Krim, but they seemed to be very prone to cracking. Opalka very productive, but uninspired taste. Someone gave me a Druzba and Reisentraube (sp?) --neither did well. Arkansas Traveler and Mortgage lifters were good, but this year I'm gonna try for bigger stuff. Cherokee Purples were okay, but didn't live up to the hype.

By far, the two best tasting tomatoes for me in 2013 were Marianna's Peace and Stump of the World. I'm getting Marianna's Peace back in the garden this year, and Rebel Yell which I was told is a cross between Stump and something else.

I'm about to order seeds for Moravsky Div, Rebel Yell, KBX, Wes, San Marzano Redorta, Paul Robeson, Spudatula, Red Penna, Chapman, Neves Azorean Red, Super Sioux, and Omar's Lebanese. I've never grown any of those, so it should be fun.

This post was edited by arley on Thu, Jan 2, 14 at 22:35


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I am surprised that Brandywine is a "zappee"! They do well for me and I like it's flavour. Last season was a lost, though, as it seems that a horde of rodents also shared my taste for good old Brandywine and got to them before I did.


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Won't grow again:
Green zebra - not particularly productive, not great flavor at any stage of ripeness
Juliette - not great taste and an in-between size and meatiness
Brandywine - nothing to recommend it in my garden - poor flavor, poor production, splitting
Roma - always seems to have foliage diseases and flavor doesn't compare favorably to other plums
Early Girl - not particularly early, not particularly flavorful, not particularly vigorous

Probably will grow:
Yellow pear - taste varies, but is mostly OK for me, produces early and well all season, provides a great color pop when mixed with chopped reds in a raw pasta sauce
Mr. Stripey - great flavor and healthy plant, though fruit may split and rot, so not particularly productive


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"Same for Burpee Supersteak Hybrid- yield too small and not sweet enough."

I should have read this post Friday, I ordered some....... Oh well.

I will not plant any black tomatoes this year, I have tried so many different ones, so I can't remember them all. I don't like the texture or flavor of any of them.

2013 was a bad year for me on tomatoes, too cool and wet.

I'll plant my old standby's and try a few new ones (new for me).

Mine will be:
Burpee Supersteak Hybrid
Rutgers
Better boys
Betters girls
Brandy boy
Brandywine
Sweet 100's
and some seed that I saved from a volunteer that did very well. It was most likely a tomato on the vine from the grocery store.


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I'm not sure how useful it would be for me to post my list because my soil is pretty different from what a lot others seems to have and it greatly affects my tomato growing. So most of what I have vetoed has to do with my particular sandy loam soil. It exacerbates problems with BER, splitting, and I seem to get off flavors in some cultivars that many others like. (Happens with potatoes, too. Yukon golds planted here taste funky and I used to love them.) But maybe it would be good to know the ones I like so far and tend to keep from season to season? I always plant Sweet Baby Girl, and really liked Sungold. Those both taste great and are so prolific that a loss of some to cracking in the rain is not a bother. The only "keeper" of the large tomatoes that I have tried so far is Brandy Boy. It had a wonderful flavor and was low on troubles.


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Never again:
Kentucky Beefsteak and Mr. Stripey. I have had really bad luck with both of these. It could be user error but I am not going to bother with them ever again.

My favorites: Tommy Toes, Sun Sugar (my only hybrid love), and Cherokee Purple.

Last year I bought a plant from a small nursery and it was labeled Box Car Willie. Well the tomatoes that grew were not Box Car Willie at all but they are my new favorite tomato. I have no idea what they are called but they are an almost neon orange color,meaty texture and have very few seeds. They are kind of flattened with some ribbing on the shoulders and are really fruity and sweet. I saved seeds and I am going to plant them again this year. Hopefully they are an heirloom and will grow true to seed.

I will be growing a bunch of new (to me) heirloom varieties this year but I am most excited about Northern Lights and Cosmonaut Volkov, just because I think their names are cool :).


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We typically choose to grow tomatoes that are low in acid and sweet in our house. I've been growing this "pineapple" type that I got in a trade as a newbie many years ago that makes big giant yellow/orange/pink/red tomatoes that we have loved in our family for all uses the last several years. I don't even know what it is, but we love it very much. I've also been growing those red currant tomatoes, and I have to tell you that these tomatoes are wonderfully accepted by my two small and very picky/anti-veggie daughters. They were heavily abundant and made great snacks. Very sweet yet still tasted like tomatoes. We're going to grow the reds and the yellows next season.

Last year I got brave and tried a brown/black type called arbuznyi. Very lovely tomatoes, was fairly productive. We couldn't get past the texture of the meat- grainy. I don't know if we'll try it again. Replacing it with stump of the world to give darker tomatoes another fair shake this coming season.

Early girl is sold everywhere around here because of our short season, and I've tried them every year and every year I wonder why I torture myself. They're really productive for me, but the fruits are too visually unimpressive for me and taste way too boring. When we lived in our apartment, I'd try them in gigantic pots on the porch and BER was always present- even with regular watering via drip irrigation. Just can't make them happy, and their flavor isn't good enough to keep trying. I won't grow them ever again.

Others I've tried and haven't done well with: All sausage-shaped paste tomatoes, Japanese black trifle (got many, MANY green and half ripened fruit every year I've tried it), all pear types (skins too thick), and brandywine types (not productive enough).

I am on the hunt for the best large, heavy producing, blemish free, round or slightly flattened, evenly red with excellent flavor tomato (my husband wants to grow it). Also tempted by burpee's steakhouse hybrid, but not tempted enough to shell out seven bucks for a few seeds that I can't save and grow true the following year if I love them.

Photo is my daughter with our favorite tomato type last summer- the un-named OP whatever it is delicious tomato. :)


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I second Arley on the wonderful taste of Marianna's Peace and Stump of the World. They are some of my real favorites, HOWEVER, they are late season, with Stump of the World especially being fairly late for me.


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Early girl is sold everywhere around here because of our short season, and I've tried them every year and every year I wonder why I torture myself. They're really productive for me, but the fruits are too visually unimpressive for me and taste way too boring.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
that is how I felt about the EG. Plus, it was not as early as claimed. So this year I will replace it with Bloody Butcher, Matina ans Slets, as early varieties.


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I've heard the same about stump of the world being late season. I've also heard that it does really well in a short season with plenty of heat. That's pretty much what we've got here in central MN- summers with plenty of heat. I'm going off of my consistent success with peppers and eggplants- because I'm probably fairly lucky. ;)

I'm going through this forum looking for others to give a whirl with too. Expanding here, being our second full growing season in our purchased home, things keep getting bigger and better!


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Pinusresinosa, your daughter is beautiful, your garden is beautiful, and that tomato is amazing!!


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Will not plant Indigo Rose again, took forever to ripen and was very bland tasting. Also have given up on many of the blacks I have tried, did not like the green shoulders and the large cores. Felt like I was wasting a lot of the tomato.
I haven't seen much mention of Black and Brown Boar, it tastes wonderful and does well in my garden. New for me last year was Tami G, large grape size, not overly sweet with good tomato taste and does not have a tough skin. Will plant both of these again along with a couple of other boar tomatoes.


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I have never had any luck here with Aunt Gertie's Gold, Prudens Purple (even with a 2nd set of seeds from another source) has not impressed me at all compared to Cherokee Purple, and I've never found a cherry tomato that wouldn't split before it was truly ripe and than let in fruit flies.

Still looking for a hybrid tomato that doesn't bore me (Big Beef is closest - Its not horrible on a salad with 1,000 Island dressing).

Kind of regret I did not find Black And Brown Boar in my catalogs this year. I'll try to remember it for next year. Where did you find it?


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My ZAP, prefer and experimental list:

Cherries:
Amy's Sugar Gem (not prolific)
Super Snow White (ditto and bland)
Yellow Tom Tom (bland)
Helsing Blue Junction (not prolific and bland)
Prefer: Black Cherry, Sweet 100, Sun Gold, Dr. Carolyn
Experimenting with: Blush, Matt's Wild Cherry, Galina's and Mountain Magic F1; Indigo Rose, Green Doctor's Frosted

Early:
Druzba (bland; not prolific)
Stupice (bland; not prolific)
Prefer: Kimberly, Matina
Experimenting with: Pink Honey

Red:
Haven't gotten a "lemon" yet
Prefer: Marianna's Peace, Omar's Lebanese, Gregori's Altai
Experimenting with: Stump of the World, Rose, Neves Azorean

Black:
Paul Robeson (muddy; bland and not prolific)
Nyagous (ditto)
Prefer: Noire De Crimee, Cherokee Purple
Experimenting with: Indian Stripe, JD's Special C-Tex

Yellow/Orange:
Manyel (small fruit; bland; not prolific)
Yellow Brandywine (small fruit vs. the DTM; bland)
Prefer: Kellogg's Breakfast, KBX, Hugh's, Azoychka
Experimenting with: Dr. Wyche's, Golden Queen (USDA)

Bicolor:
Virginia Sweets (not prolific)
Lucky Cross (not prolific)
Marvel Stripe (not prolific)
Prefer: Pineapple
Experimenting with: Gold Medal, Hillbilly

smithmal


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

You can find the Black and Brown Boar seeds at wildboarfarms.com
I am planting their Pink Berkeley Tie-Dye again and trying Solar Flare for the first time.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

ZAPPED - Black Cherry. The flavor was ok, but I didn't care for the leathery, tough skin. I prefer the thin skin and flavor of Sun Gold.

Big success for 2013 - Brandy Boy. Productive, juicy and tangy. Too tangy for my wife, but I like some zing in my tomatoes.

pinusresinosa, I love the photo of your garden!


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Yellow Pear: absolutely tasteless. We actually let that plant go last year without harvesting the last ten million fruit it produced.
Chocolate Cherry: Flavor was good, but we got about four fruits. I might try it again someday to see if I get a better yield.
Pineapple: I got one tomato, wasn't impressed. I prefer my Hillbilly tomatoes in the yellow beefy department.

I am mystified by so many people not liking Green Zebra. We love it! Tangy, juicy, and productive.


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Never again:

Green Sausage (hands down the worst tomato I've ever had - hard and tasteless, even when ripe)
Any of the Zebras - I just don't like that in-between size
Arkansas Traveller - didn't produce enough (one tomato)
Pink Grapefruit - went from underripe to overripe overnight
Indigo Rose - decided I find blue tomatoes visually unappealing, and Indigo Rose is pretty tasteless
Sungold - never produces much for me (I know, weird)

Favorites:
Rebel Yell - best tomato I've ever had, good producer too
White Tomesol - Pleasant, mild flavor, very productive, beautiful
Pilcer Vesy - delicious and productive
Orange Oxheart - Super sweet, almost like a dessert tomato


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  • Posted by cziga Zone 5 -Toronto (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 24, 14 at 13:24

Stump of the World was very late for me too, but the taste was worth it. I would grow it again :)

I will never grow Vintage Wine again. It is a beautiful tomato to look at, to be sure, IF YOU CAN GET IT TO NOT CRACK. Perhaps it is just my specific garden conditions, I do sometimes get some cracking, but this tomato was the worst by far. I mean at least 5x worse than any other, with both vertical and horizontal crack lines and so many of them that you could barely see the colour of the tomato. Crazy. And two years in a row too, with two different seed sources. The only tomato in those years, and in my garden in general, that has ever done that. I will not grow it again for that reason, but it may not have liked my garden?

This year I am growing white and black tomatoes:
White Wonder
White Queen
Great White
(possibly Snowball or White Beauty - I'm still trying to figure out if they are diff tomatoes, I am seeing conflicting reports)

Black Krim
Black from Tula
Amazon Chocolate
Black Ethiopian
Paul Robeson
Brad's Black Heart
Bedouin
Nyagous
Noire de Cosseboef
Japanese Black Trifele
Carbon
Sara Black
Tasmanian Chocolate

And of course for some paste tomatoes: Cuore di Bue


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I won't plant Brandywine, Black Krim, Cherokee- maybe it's my soil, but none of them have done well for me.
I love BrandyBoy, Sun Gold, and Lemon Boy (the latter which Burpee does not have available for purchase as a plant, unfortunately). I bought Italian Ice- very small cherry tomato one year and it has volunteered here and there since. I really like it because it is prolific and easy care- flavor is not as good as Sun Gold.
Wondering if anyone has tried Green Envy-a cherry tom offered by Burpee...
And what is your favorite red tomato?


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I grew a green tomato once (forget the name). Never could decide when it was ripe...


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  • Posted by Rhyu 8b- Canada (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 12, 14 at 4:14

Tried a few plants last year, but it was a pretty poor year for us with tomatoes, but thats sort of how it goes on the coast, very hit and miss. Didn't help we had a rat that kept stealing and destroying the tomatoes as they ripened so we got very few in the end. : (

Zaps:
Yellow Pear: Probably the worst tomato last year, or any year. Produced okay (not exceptional), but the fruit was mealy, bland and honestly disgusting. Usually ended up having to spit them out. I wished the rat took these, but even he didn't want them (lol). Most fruit stayed on the plant.
Sunset Falls: (Bi-colored red/yellow roma)- Set a decent amount for a determinate, but the fruit were mealy and almost all the fruit suffered from "puffiness" (the gel cavities were empty and the fruit square shaped). These were at least salvageable as soup ingredients. Taste was bland.
Black Cherry: Produced fairly well, good texture, had flavor, but unfortunately no one really liked said flavor.
Black Pearl: Like Black Cherry but the flavor was blander. Fruit never seemed to color up properly either, stayed a bit "green" textured no matter how long left on the plant.
Brandywine: Plant never really took off and stayed very small, it did produce but ended up being a pest magnet. The one fruit we did manage to wrestle from the rat that had minimal damage, after a thorough washing and removal of most of the pre-consumed areas was kinda mealy, though the flavor was good. Conditions aren't optimal for it here, I imagine elsewhere it'd be a good tomato.
Super Snow White: I actually didn't mind these, but most others weren't thrilled. Texture was nice and had a good size, though wasn't very productive (likely due to aforementioned larger size for a cherry type). Flavor was subtle, but if left to ripen fully was interestingly fruity and fairly sweet, which I liked. If you like a fruity, less "tomato" flavored fruit and don't mind lesser production, I might still recommend this to others. Something novel for kids.

Maybe:
Green Zebra: Didn't get a lot of fruit from this one for the trouble (like one harvest of 5 fruit), most of the fruit had developed issues that rendered them inedible due to taking too long to mature before the weather went south. The few I got made great fried green tomatoes though. Not sure if worth the space.

Grow Again:
Sun Gold: Grew well, pretty good output, sweet with good flavor.
Sun Sugar: Very similar to Sun Gold (accidently purchased thinking was the Gold), though noticeably different (mostly visually). Still very good overall if you like a sweeter tomato.

Really hoping for a better run in 2014


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I noticed a lot of negative comments on Indigo Rose, I had a different experience. I really enjoyed the sweet tangy flavor and found that it really developed after canning. They did take awhile to mature and I thinned out some fruit after they put on so heavy. I also plant at least one yellow pear every year and love those tasty little treats! I get some of the highest yields off just one plant and had success sun drying the excess. Maybe its just that Oklahoma red clay.

I will no longer grow Green Zebra or Mr. Stripy.


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Although I have tried many of the blacks and agree with the common sentiment that they are not all that great in flavor and especially not in texture there is ONE exception:

Black Velvet.

I love the taste and growth of this 'mater. It's vigorous, but not crazy. The fruit is about the sizeof a tennis ball and they don't crack too bad for me. The flavor tho is what I find remarkable....YUM! (I have a tendency to eat them until the corners of my mouth cracks) The first year I planted it, I thought it was an heirloom and saved seeds. The second year I planted the seeds and guess what...I couldn't tell the difference and was surprised when I read that it is indeed a hybrid and not an heirloom. I have 6,000 seeds just in case (wink, wink)

I was not impressed with flavor or texture of last years:
Cuor Di Bue, Dester, Paul Robeson, Black Icicle, Constoluto Genovese, Polbig or Applegate.

This year I'm trying:
Glacier, Golden Treasure, White Queen, (and I'm giving Early girl another shot.)


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I'm dropping Early Girl. It's early and that's about it. Still trying to decide on a replacement.

In debate at the moment about super sweet 100. It as a hearty plant and an excellent producer, but it was nearly unmanageably large for my garden. Trying to figure if there's another good producing, flavorful indeterminate cherry that won't be quite as much of a monster.

Brandywine was a slow producer but was worth it for the taste. Big Beef was an excellent producer and great flavor. They're staying for sure.


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I like Yellow Pear too. For me it's not sweet (UGH !) but merely mild and beefsteak-y. It can't be beat for beauty IMO.


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I'm having a hard time deciding if I even want to grow tomatoes any more.

I wasted a tremendous amount of time, work and money over about eight years listening to truly terrible advice here before discovering and proving to an absolute, scientific certitude that my "ignorant" suspicion I had after my first season (broadly derided by the assembled "experts") was right:

I will pass this along to those who are complaining of low yields from the very varieties that failed me.

The nighttime temperatures here fall too low for fruit to set on many (notional) heirlooms

I proved this by the unplanned experiment of having a strong wind splitting the stem of an unproductive Black Krim plant about in half. The smaller side collapsed into the mid-September weeds. The larger side remained erect. To that point, I had had no (0) tomatoes from any of the heirlooms I had planted in the spring.

About ten days later, I was pulling up a bunch of this wretched garden when I dug through the weeds and discovered the side of the plant that had fallen down on the ground and was now hidden in the undergrowth was covered with tomatoes!

The "healthy" side that was up in the air still had none.

Another row of somewhat sickly hybrids I had given up for dead after an almost-unproductive spring and summer were now completely overgrown. I dug through the weeds and looked at them, and they were covered with tomatoes.

Looking back on my childhood here, I remember my mother -- who was considered a serious gardener -- only had success with tomatoes that grew on thick, low-lying bushes, where they retained heat from the hot ground during the chilly nights, Every time I've had tomato plants like that (which is unfortunately rare), I got more tomatoes than I knew what to do with. If I had taller plants, I got nearly (or absolutely) nothing.


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Won't be bothering with any plum tomatoes....English summers just don't cut the mustard when it comes to heat.
Cherokee Purple - a huge misshapen, splitting monster.
Gardener's Delight - lovely tomatoes but far far too rampant,
Brandywine (or any other beefsteak types)
The bland and tasteless Golden Sunrise
Any white tomatoes

Am sticking with St.Pierre, Bloody Butcher, the hybrid Ferline and a reliable and tasty early, Matina. 15 of each sorts us out for sauces and ketchup - 60 plants is about the limit of pinching, tying and general fussing I can manage.


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Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

Lest we, I, you, they, it forget... Fuzzy Peach. Produced a lot of berries for me in the one and only season I grew it. Really a bland sort of thing with little to offer in the way of tomato taste.

Reginald


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I won't be growing Pineapple or Hillbilly again. Or Mr. Stripey. Beautiful, OK production, but just not the flavor I want.

I won't grow Black Sea Man again. I love all black toms except that one. Taste and texture just weren't right for me. Low and late production.

No more Early Girl unless I take up dry farming, but right now I'm using Earthboxes. (Used to have a 25'x50' plot, so this reduced number of choices is taking some getting used to.)

No yellow pear cherry types unless I live somewhere I can have chickens again. They love the things, and a single big plant can keep 10 hens occupied and happy.

I get low yields from Brandywines and Cherokee Purple, but that's OK... I can get them at the farmer's market. (I don't grow bell peps for the same reason.)

Always, always: Black cherry. Black Pear (*not* plum). Sun Gold.

Matt's wild cherry and Ghost Cherry when I can find them.

And I always try a mystery kind that's obviously mislabeled. One of my black cherries has very different leaves. It will be fun to see what it winds up to be. Last year an Early Girl turned out to be a flattish medium very fruity flavored yellow. Not worth saving the seeds, but it was fun.

Might grow again: Stump of the World. German Johnson. Caspian Pink.

New to me this year: Isis Candy, Japanese Black Trifele, Better Boy, Big Beef. My mom grew Better Boy in New Jersey and then southern Alabama when it was new. I'm hoping Better Boy and Big Beef will hold up better to the heat when the heirlooms tend to go dormant.

I'm still hoping to find the tom of my dreams to grow here: Full acid, lots of flavor, maybe a little smoky, tastes like you already salted it. I'd love some suggestions.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

That's exactly the tomato I'd like too.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

I'm still hoping to find the tom of my dreams to grow here: Full acid, lots of flavor, maybe a little smoky, tastes like you already salted it. I'd love some suggestions.
########

Why don't you guys sprinkle a dash of salt and few drops of balsamic vinegar on any juicy tomato ?


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

  • Posted by pauln z7B Arkansas (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 24, 14 at 20:31

I won't be planting again: Hawaiian Pineapple - huge and beautiful, but too sweet for me, Yellow Pear - bland, Virginia Sweets - pretty sure fusarium wilt came from the seeds and only got one fruit, Brandywines - tried several and it's just too hot here,

Now, that being said, here are some of my favorites: Amana Orange - just can't say enough good stuff about these...prolific, large furits with great real tomato taste, Pink Ping Pong - the hits just keep coming, Mortgage Lifter - not abundant but huge and the best tasting tomato I've ever known, Black Cherry, Green Zebra - freebie seeds I tried last year, and once I figured out to let them ripen until golden and soft, fell in love, Oaxican Jewel - too sweet, but look like stained glass window when sliced, Glacier - not the tastiest, but very early and produce until frost.


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RE: Tomatoes You'll Never Plant Again - Part II

Almost half of the tomatoes that I am planting are from "Farmers market" bought tomatoes. I liked them and I figure those MARKET GARDENERS in my area know better . Otherwise they wouldn't grow them. The remaining half are mostly EARLY and MID season varieties. From last season I dropped :
-- SWEET 100 >>> TO SMALL fruits for too big plants
-- Brandywine ... I did not get a single ripe tomato off of it.
-- Black Krim .. Got few. But wer small, cracked and the plant was sick all season (curling leaves)
-- Early Girl. ... It was not that good and not that EARLY either. I am growing Bloody Butcher as alternative.


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