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Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

Posted by mystere540 8 (My Page) on
Fri, Jun 5, 09 at 11:07

I am growing 11 different varieties of heirlooms and I noticed the other day that some of my leaves were beginning to turn a beautiful lime green color at the top of my Black Krims. After two days and a large rain I have noticed that a few of the other plants look like they might be doing the same thing. Can someone please tell me what is causing this to happen? Will I still get any fruit from them this year? Is there anything I can do?

Image link: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt (44 k)


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

Here is a link to better pictures of my garden on flicker. The last pictures in the set are the plants in question. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/23524638@N03/sets/72157618268462090/

Here is a link that might be useful: My garden album on flicker


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

  • Posted by jean001 z8aPortland, OR (My Page) on
    Sat, Jun 6, 09 at 20:34

Definitely *not* Fusarium. Wrong kind of yellowing.


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

Have you fertilized these yet?


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

I put some Malorganite down about a month ago and it was great but it did cause a little burn. Maybe I should try some blood meal? These plants are all blossoming right now and most are at 4 to six feet. What organic fertilizer should I use at this stage. I do see some fruit coming on.


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

  • Posted by jean001 z8aPortland, OR (My Page) on
    Sun, Jun 7, 09 at 15:47

You wrote "Malorganite [sic] down about a month ago and it was great but it did cause a little burn."

Really? Shouldn't occur if used according to directions.


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

The man that I asked at Southern States Farm supply said that I could just dress them on the top of the soil so I did. I used to much and it ate away at the stem.


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

  • Posted by jean001 z8aPortland, OR (My Page) on
    Thu, Jun 11, 09 at 14:20

Okay, so that's one of the many live-and-learn lessons we all have in the garden.

In the future, sidedress your plants by placing the fertilizer of any kind about 6 to 8 inches away from the stem.


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

Looks nothing like pictures of fusarium I've seen. Looks like really healthy plants, but maybe needs something in the way of nutrition. I love fish emulsion. It activates the realy vital bacterial activity that goes on in the soil (rhizosphere)really fast and is slightly acidic, which, as I'm sure you know, tomato plants really like.

Thanks for sharing your pics - your gardening looks so immaculate and your plants look beautiful! Usually when I've seen that look on leaves, yellowing or paleness starting at the stem end of a leaf, of many kinds of plants, it can be a pH problem, but at the same time don't overwater. You know, sometimes we can get too conscientious and make our plants environments a little too lush, like a rainforest - maybe that's it!


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

Looking around this site, I stumbled upon a post titled HELP!!! Tomato Problem Solver 2. Seems somebody posted an entire book, seems to be a trouble shooting type of a book, it has a section called "Better Color Pictures of Mineral Deficiencies in Tomatoes" which looks just like one of your photos with the yellowing in stem end of leaf. ID's it as iron deficiency, helped by acidifying the pH (as in fish emulsion, or some other means - I've had good luck with 2Tb vinegar in gal H2O for speedy results) You might need to read up on iron Rx's for tomato - I use chelated iron for certain plants, (mandevilla, camelia, star jasmine, for ex's). I don't know off hand what to do for tomatoes, but it always helps to acidify (iron take-up is related to pH), at least while you are reading up, it's something you can do immediately. Maybe you don't explicitly need to add iron, maybe you just need to lower pH. Happy reading! Let me know what you find out..


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

This is a good reason for using organic fertilizers on tomatoes. Most of the available organics such as Epsoma's "tomato-tone", contains the most commonly deficient trace nutrients, including calcium and iron at a more naturally consistent and available rate.

Milorganite is ok for your trees and lawn and ornamentals but not so great for edible crops because milorganite(treated and dried sewage)has high amounts of the heavy metals not ideal for human consumption.


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RE: Can someone ID this as Fusarium Wilt

I wish I could edit previous posts but it appears that milorganite is no longer considered dangerous for vegetables? At any rate, I have had much less issue with tomatoes since switching to organic fertilizers. It's hard to keep up with the issues that have been hyped at one point or another.


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