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Pineapple guava in California

Posted by Heathen1 10a (My Page) on
Mon, Apr 25, 05 at 15:51

Anyone growing one of these in California? I am curious about it's water needs... I have mine in a pot.... I also got a pink guava yesterday, but I think that one takes more water???
Thanks for all help.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Pineapple guava in California

Heathen1,

Once established, pineapple guavas (Acca/Feijoa sellowiana) are actually quite drought tolerant. I've seen plants that grow with no summer water at all. However, fruit production on such plants is scant -- some irrigation is needed if you want a decent crop. (Also, small plants would probably die in most locations without dry-season irrigation.)

I've never grown the tropical guava (P. guajava) -- but, as you suggest, I would guess that it would require more water.


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RE: Pineapple guava in California

Thanks! I thought so... it even LOOKS like a drought tolerant plant... but I wanted to know if I was almost killing it. :o)
I kept a manila mango alive through last winter... the nurseryman says I should be able to keep the tropical guava alive. :o)


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RE: Pineapple guava in California

Heathen1,

Sure, if you're in Southern California z10a, you should have no problem keeping a tropical guava alive through the winter.


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RE: Pineapple guava in California

No... I live in Sacramento... just depends on where you live in Sac on what your weather is like... 6 miles from my house, my friend gets a hard frost! :o) Downtown Sacramento can be a solid zone 10a... I am really, just the bottom of zone 10a...but I also have a simple unheated greenhouse, which is enough for my zone for many of the hardier tropicals.


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RE: Pineapple guava in California

Heathen1,

If you're in Sacramento, I would strongly urge you to keep your tropical guava inside your unheated greenhouse.

The plant might very well survive outdoors (if up against a warm, south-facing wall, etc.) but lack of winter heat will probably cause the fruit to be watery and tasteless.

The temperature boost that your greenhouse can provide will most likely be crucial if you want to get fruit as sweet and tasty as can be found in the tropics.


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RE: Pineapple guava in California

The pineapple guava requires very little water. It produces the heaviest crops during years with more rainfall, but it also is very drought resistant once established. These guys always produce regardless of the neglect factor. Just make sure they get as much sun as you can and they will give and give. Additionally, you can prune the heck out of them (I have mine very low and wide from intentional pruning over the years) without much loss in production. The blossoms are absolutely stunning and really tasty too. The petals of the blossom are used in desserts and as a garnish.


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RE: Pineapple guava in California

  • Posted by Eggo z10soCal LBC (My Page) on
    Tue, May 3, 05 at 4:57

Tropical guavas are mostly a carefree tree here in my area. Did you know that even seeds of very unripe fruits will sprout? I found that out last year!


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Perplexed by Production of Pineapple Guava

I have an 8 years old pineapple guava. It gave us fruit the first 2 or 3 years, and then stopped. It blooms and then the tiny fruit dry up and fall off. I am absolutely perplexed. It is well watered, and I even hand polinated it this year with a paint brush with no luck! Any suggestions would be helpful. We are in the Los Angeles area. Thanks kindly.


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RE: Pineapple guava in California

Spanky Kitty,

Three possibilities.
1. Are you feeding your feijoa? Stop. When you resume in two years use light PK no N.
2. Fruit is born on first and second year growth. A little pruning should help push new wood for fruiting.
3 Your variety might be lonely. There may have been a mate in the neighborhood that has been removed. No Tom cat, no kittens. Stop by your large box store and look for a Nazemetz (20 bush, 27-34 tree), plus a one gallon baby bush (3.99) There are some HD in Covina, but they can order one in a week. Put the baby near your existing tree and the Nazemetz somewhere in the same yard. Watch out. Meow.


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RE: Pineapple guava in California

  • Posted by Eggo z10soCal LBC (My Page) on
    Thu, Aug 25, 05 at 23:32

I agree Why Buy What You Can Grow! lol.
It does sound like a pollination or cross pollination problem.


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