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Agapetes question

Posted by karyn1 MD 7 (bhkalen@aol.com) on
Mon, Sep 29, 08 at 19:33

I have two varieties of agapetes, Ludgvan Cross and Serpens. Both are growing very well and have at least tripled in size since I got them last fall but neither has bloomed. Is there anything I can do to get them to bloom and what time of the year do they normally flower? These are kept in a greenhouse in filtered light year round. I was also wondering what's the best way to propagate this plant?
Thanks,
Karyn


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Agapetes question

Hi Karyn,
I grow Agapetes 'ludgvan Cross', serpens and smithiana and find that these tend to have the biggest flush of bloom in the spring - early summer. All of them can have intermittent bloom through the year too. I grow mine in filtered bright shade, and fertilize with osmocote in the spring. For winter I move them into a hoop house that offers frost protection (we can drop down to 20 degrees on a clear night) and keep them a touch drier.

I have found that these propagate from cuttings really easy spring through summer. When I have taken cuttings in the fall they have just sat (not died though)not showing any type of root development until spring. I set my cuttings up in a 4:1 (give or take) perlite/peat mix and have rooted them in an aquarium with a lid (to hold in humidity). I typically use KLN rooting hormone, but have found they will root fine without it. I have also set them up on a mist bench when I have that available, but it is not necessary.
I hope this helps, Alicia :~)


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RE: Agapetes question

Thanks Alicia,
I guess not too many people grow agapetes. lol We seem to be doing the same things so maybe I'll get blooms next spring. I hope so. It's not a bad looking foliage plant and I do like the enlarged caudex but I'd really love to see blooms. They are so pretty. I guess I'll wait until the spring to take cuttings. Do they bloom along the newer or older growth or both? BTW what does the smithiana look like? Thanks again for the info.
Karyn


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RE: Agapetes question

It's just not getting enough sunlight.The more sun mine gets-the heavier the bloom. Also other things to keep up on are,the soil should be constantly moist-fast draining as it's a virtual epiphyte.
In San Francisco they do best in full sun and are planted that way.


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RE: Agapetes question

Karyn,
you're welcome. A. smithiana has yellow flowers, round leaves and similar growing form.
Stanofh may have something regarding the amount of light your plants are getting. True enough the Agapetes growing in the city are in full sun, however their temps are cooler (than ours in Sebastopol) and often full sun is overcast. Where I live I see days of upper 90's low 100's often during the summer and have found that they do best in bright shade for me. My shade covering is about 40%. The plants that I am growing under trees will get just a couple of hours of full morning sun when the sun moves lower on the horizon.
Alica :~)


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