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What I learned about guavas this year

Posted by Eggo z10soCal LBC (My Page) on
Sun, Nov 27, 05 at 4:15

This has been an interesting learning experience about guavas this year. I have two different guavas producing fruit right now. A round type. And a more pear shaped pebbly variety. The round guava fruits have not been doing well at all during our cooler nights(and its not even that cool, mostly low 50Fs). Still the fruits have been shrivelling up, drying, getting winkly, dropping and not maturing at all. The other one has no effect at all, and is still hard and appears to be ripening. These are the crunchy varieties. I'm so use to the round ones which I had for years, I always took its inability to handle the cold that well to just being guavas, something normal. The thing is these two plants get the same exact condition. Why? The pebbly ones is grafted onto the round type rootstock. Here's a picture of the fruits, fruited on the exact same tree. But the pebbly ones on the right are handling the cooler nights much better. I shouldn't be but I am quite surprise by the differences on the fruits cool tolerance.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Eggo, do you grow your guavas in a container or outdoors in the earth?
How much sun do they get?
I've a small, 8" or so Pineapple guava growing in a container..It's in a south window, some additional night light, a cool, semi-humid room. Do you consider the guava slow-growing? Do they go dorment in winter? In summer, this plant is placed outside. Thanks, Toni


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

  • Posted by Eggo z10soCal LBC (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 28, 05 at 1:31

Their outdoors in the ground. It gets about 4-5 hours of full sun a day. Then some partial shade and shade. I should have mentioned that they are tropical guavas, Psidium guajava. Pineapple guavas are Feijoa sellowiana. Unfortunately I don't have one of those. They are suppose to be much hardier though. Here's some info on them from CRFG, pineapple guava


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Hi , how do you grow guavas from seeds ? Thanx


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Eggo,

I grow Ruby X guava here in Phoenix on a hot south wall. I really don't have any problem with cold. Some of the leaves turn purplish in winter (not frost damage or anything), but other than that it is totally fine. Grows great.

As I am sure you know, they want all the sun you can give them, and need lots of heat to get ripe. The 4-5 hours of sun doesn't seem like enough to me.

If you are zone 10 on the coast in SoCal (I'm from OC originally) you may not have enough heat to ripen them before you get cool again. The heat will produce the sugars in the fruit too. If you go to Cloudforest Cafe (Norcal coast bulletin board tropical growers) they express their frustration with ripening guavas in their cool coastal climate.

It is intersting the difference you have encountered.

Personally, I don't like 'Bangkok Apple'/white crunchy types. I like the eating and juicing types.

Good luck. Thanks for sharing your experiences.


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Eggo, i thought i hated you when i saw your cherimoya pics, but THIS?? j/k! those are beautiful guavas. how big are they, can't really tell from the pics, are they the large softball sized ones?

in my experience, guavas don't mind 50 degrees as long as they get full sun, which there is plenty of in houston. we just need to keep them alive through winter.


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

I have been havng loads of strawberry guavas (red guavas)during the hot summer months. The tree thrives in full sun. They make excellent guava jelly. I would like to trade the baby trees, about 6 inches tall, with anyone who has some heliconia (spelling ?) roots for exhange.


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Hi Eggo,
You helped me out a while ago to ID my banana trees, also growing in the LBC. I have two guava trees of the same variety as your bumpy ones. Mine will eventually turn yellow, but they never get very soft. This past year I had many that grew to the size of a softball, and the tree routinely requires staking to keep the branches from breaking. The problem is they taste yucky, nothing like a normal guava. I was told some asians treat them like vegetables, and fry them. I have seen Philipino people eating the same guavas like apples while the guavas are green. I haven't tried doing either of those. For me, their highest and best use is letting the kids pick them and throw them. P.S. I saw your pineapple pics - cool!


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

how many years does it take for guava tree to fruit?


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

  • Posted by eggo z10soCal LBC (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 1, 06 at 0:39

It takes guavas about 3 years to flower in California, from seed.

lbbanana man, it sounds like you probably have a green eating type. If your not familiar with them, its a bit hard to determine when to pick them. These type are ripe when it changes color from dark green to a white/light greenish color. At peak ripeness the soft flesh that surround the seeds should be sweet but the outer flesh should be crispy & crunchy. Since you get so many, you could probably pick them at different intervals. These varieties will not soften(more like shrivel up and dehydrate) up correctly, if its yellow its probably waaay over ripe. It actually loses sweetness and tastes when this occur and resembles some kind of tasteless shriveled up pear/apple. Here's another way to determine ripeness, stick a knife into the fruit and twist, there should be a clean separation between the outer crispy flesh and the inner flesh, its at its best during this time, here's a picture...guava section

Jun, they are the large softball size but because it fruits so heavily it was smaller, it must be thinned or it won't produce such size.

sonotaps, yep I experience the same thing. Right now the small 1-2 feet seedlings have these very red leaves. It may be the lack of heat too, my earlier crops ripen alright but the ones that are behind never makes it, but those pebbly ones seem to have no problems, although some of them do lack tastes that late in the year.


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

I "think" i have a Guava tree.............am in north Florida, it has never had fruit but does bloom, (pink and red) Can anyone post a picture of a tree?


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Philfarmer, I am assuming, North Florida, that you are a zone 8b? I am betting that you have a strawberry or pineapple guava...feijoa guavas, not psidium guajavas. They really like it on the dry side during the warm months... a difficulty for Floridians.


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Here's a flower from mine, which was labelled "pineapple guava" when I bought it. I wish I had bought a different type.

Lars


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

hi, I am interested in getting a "bangkok apple" guava tree. My wife has been wanting one. She said she tasted one in China where it is crunchy and was from Thailand. I'm guessing it is the "bangkok apple" one since it is most commonly found there. Does anyone have a tree (or plant) they can sell me? Thanks. Please tell me sizes/prices that you have.


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

I have a guava tree in container at my backyard in Dallas, TX and it is about 3 yrs old. Please see the attached photo. So far i have not seen any fruit !. I have been pruning so that i can put inside my patio during the winter time .
What should i do to get this tree fruiting? Thanks in advance
Jimmy

This post was edited by JIMMY_SAYAVONG on Mon, Jul 29, 13 at 11:16


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

My seedling has 1 fruit by the end of the 3rd summer. The 4th yr gave me about 60 fruits. I didn't know they have to be thin. Until it was too late. Only 1 ripen outside taste great. The rest were bland and ripen inside. I left about 26 and it was still too many. This year I am leaving 19 and thin the rest.


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

GUAVA!

Glad i stubled here.

I just tasted my first tree grown guava.
I didnt think they would be ready yet (i have lots on the tree)

i pulled lightly on some, and a few fell off, so i guess they are ripe.
They smell very musky, taste OK,
but the seeds are a pain in the A**

Are these properly ripe, and what type of Guava is it ?

We get torrential rains here (New Orleans), i thought maybe they got TOO much water and dropped early.

Should i "thin"the tree, or is it too late?
%95 have not fallen yet, these are the first

 photo g3_zps71ca16e8.jpg

thanks
Brad

This post was edited by greenman62 on Sat, Aug 17, 13 at 15:04


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

I purchased two Hong Kong Guava trees and they were shipped from Georgia. Shortly after planting them the leaves dried and turned brown. Is this normal for this time in the season. Do guava trees lose their leaves in the fall.


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

That plant looks like it desperately needs water.


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Looks like it is already dead ..


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Looks like it is already dead ..


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RE: What I learned about guavas this year

Hello,

I live in South Florida and I'm looking to purchase a guava plant.Can anyone tell me what is a good hardy variety of guava to grow in my zone 10 and where I can purchase one or two? I bought a guava plant from Pine Island Nursery a few years back and they sold me a white variety instead of the pink variety I requested.Eventually I had to take out the guava because it wasn't doing well.

Thanks,
Allymarie


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