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Chenille plants

Posted by jasamina none (My Page) on
Thu, Nov 1, 12 at 22:17

Can I go ahead and plant chenille plants in the ground now or should I wait? I live in Vero Beach.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Chenille plants

We have no idea what climate zone you are in, so can't answer you.


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RE: Chenille plants

Jasamina, I live on the Southwest coast of Florida and my chenille plant always get nipped from the frost every winter. I cut it down in the spring and it grows nice and full very quickly. I would suggest you keep it in a pot for now so you can move it to the garage or other protected location on cold nights. Then plant it in the ground in the spring.
Linda Leaf


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RE: Chenille plants

Jasamina, I live on the Southwest coast of Florida and my chenille plant always get nipped from the frost every winter. I cut it down in the spring and it grows nice and full very quickly. I would suggest you keep it in a pot for now so you can move it to the garage or other protected location on cold nights. Then plant it in the ground in the spring.
Linda Leaf


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RE: Chenille plants

The zone I'm in is 9b. The people at the nursery said to go ahead and put it in the ground but currently I have them in hanging baskets to move them in case we do get a freeze.


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RE: Chenille plants

Acalypha hispida is the botanical name of this plant - it doesn't like it when temperatures drop below 50.


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RE: Chenille plants

I thought I posted a response to this yesterday, but I must have forgotten to hit the final "post" button.

I assume you are referring to Acalypha reptans/repens/pendula, the creeping plant which is often grown in hanging baskets. Acalphya hispida is also called "Chenille plant" and is an upright bush about 5 feet tall with much larger leaves (several inches). The catkins also get much longer--I think up to about 20 inches long.

We can grow Acalypha reptans outside in California zones 9/10 but I've only seen A. hispida in greenhouses. I have heard it grows outside in South Florida.

I had never seen Acalypha reptans planted in the ground here, so I bought a plant in January or February of this year and planted rooted divisions of it in the ground. They didn't do much for a long time, and still haven't. I gave the potted plant to my mom and it also did not bloom for a long time, but finally did when the weather warmed later in Spring.

We are zone 9b, but are average temperatures in winter (and the rest of the year) are a lot lower than zone 9b in Florida. In winter we average about 60/40, with many, many nights in the 30s. Frosts tend to be very mild and only for a couple hours. So my experience is likely very different from that in the same USDA zone in Florida. I don't think the plant I put in the ground experienced any frost.

Plant Delights Nursery claims that one of the creeping varieties (they call it Acalypha pendula--I'm not sure if this is the same as A. reptans or not...) can survive in zone 7b.

Here is a link that might be useful: Plant Delight's Nursery claim of hardy Acalphya pendula


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