Return to the Tropical Fruits Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
What to do with the low branches on mango?

Posted by sapote 10a (My Page) on
Mon, Aug 11, 14 at 18:43

My Cat-Hoa-Loc, a suppose to be very famous Vietnamese variety I bought from TopT this spring, is sending many low new growths closer to ground, but above graft line. The top also has two new big branches. Should I cut off these low new growths or just leave them alone to help build up the root system and the trunk? They are just about 1" above the graft line which is about 1" above the ground. Here are some photos. I'm sure a normal properly prune tree should not have the 1" off the ground branches. What should I do?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: What to do with the low branches on mango?

A close-up photo


 o
RE: What to do with the low branches on mango?

I'd trim off the low ones and let the top go. The low ones just become a nuisance.


 o
RE: What to do with the low branches on mango?

Speaking theoretically! I'd air-layer them and make them into more new trees.

Ask the experts first if at this stage they can hold up, and the main trunk can survive the procedure.


 o
RE: What to do with the low branches on mango?

Those young branches are too tender for grafting or air layer. I just cut them off last night and felt sad. I should have cut them off when they were 1", instead of 8" healthy looking mango. I didn't cut them off because I was thinking more leaves meant more energy gain from the sun for the tree, but now I agreed that those lower water sprouts will slow the top main growths.

I very much water all the mangoes every day now in 80's degrees. No more burnt leaves as I had before.


 o
RE: What to do with the low branches on mango?

I learned that air-layering is agood way for more Longan and Lychee, but bad result for citrus and mango since the root system will be so weak that the young trees just sit there for many years doing nothing. Graft to a root stock is the only way for mangoes and citrus.


 o
RE: What to do with the low branches on mango?

<< Posted by sapote 10a
Wed, Aug 13, 14 at 15:38
I very much water all the mangoes every day now in 80's degrees. No more burnt leaves as I had before.>>

That's lower than our winter temps, LOL. But I agree about the airlayering. Your grafted plant would do better on the rootstock it was attached to rather than its own. Which is why it was grafted in the first place. To airlayer would be going backwards.


 o
RE: What to do with the low branches on mango?

"To airlayer would be going backwards."

I'm not sure this is generally true for all fruit trees, since I have yet seen a Lychee or Longan that has root stock grafting -- they all are air-layered. I think some plants do very well with air-layer and some don't, hence we have many different propagation methods.


 o
RE: What to do with the low branches on mango?

We were talking about airlayering your mango, not other fruit trees.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Tropical Fruits Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here