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Some pictures from around the yard

Posted by mostro jax/9a (My Page) on
Tue, Sep 4, 12 at 12:23

Some Pics of My Yard

Tip: You can right click the photos and display or safe to your computer for larger/higher quality image...

Here is my very productive Key Lime tree (four years old):


Four year old true Key Lime tree


Four year old true Key Lime tree

My Seedling Bitter Orange:


Four year old seedling bitter orange

My seedling mango (Jax) I posted about last year:


Seedling mango tree in Jax.

My seedling Toledo mango from Santiago de Cuba:


Potted Toledo mango.

Various citrus trees (around five years old):


Citrus lineup.

Various citrus trees (around five years old):


Citrus lineup.

Various citrus trees (around five years old):


Citrus lineup.

Barbados Cherry from Cuba (cutting from very old tree):


Barbados Cherry from Cuba

Florida Sweet Barbados Cherry (around 2.5 years old):


Florida Sweet Barbados Cherry.

My Makok sapodilla (I love this tree):


Makok sapodilla.

Three year old potted tamarind (has one fruit!):


Potted tamarind.

More potted stuff:


More potted stuff.

Random potted stuff:


Random stuff.

Very productive grapefruit (Ruby Red):


Ruby Red grapefruit.

Mayer lemon grafted on bitter orange (2.5 years old):


Mayer lemon on bitter orange rootstock.

HB pomelo (no fruit yet, just growing):


HB pomelo.

No fruits, but still cool:


orchid

No fruit, but also cool:


orchid

Pitaya plant of unknown variety:


Pitaya cactus.

Carambola, planted a year ago:


Carambola (star fruit)

I got a bunch more stuff, but I figured that was plenty for now!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

wonderful trees, thanks for sharing


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

What all are you covering in the wintertime?


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

Hi Doglips:
I cover all of the usual suspects. I have no miraculous stories of cold hardy trees or anything like that. Of course, the level of protection depends on the tree and the minimum expected temp. Se below for an idea of when I protect plants:

* At 32F and above:
. I protect nothing.

* At less than 32F:
. In ground: Mango, Key Lime, Mamey Sapote.
. In pots: Makok, Atemoya, tamarind, Barbados cherries, mango, and other delicate plants.

* At less than 29F:
. In ground: Carambola, guavas, pineapples.
. In pots: White sapote, Brogdon abocado, pineapples, Surinam cherry.

* At less than 26F:
. In Ground: Pitaya (<= 24F), grapefruit (<=24F),Mexicola (<= 24F).
. In pots: Limequat, misc citrus.

* Never protect (lowest temp ever was 22F):
. In ground: Pineapple guavas, date palms, pomelos/oranges/mandarins/kumquats, loquat, mayer lemon, gardenias, plums, apples, blueberries.
. In pots: All potted plants are protected at this point.

I try placing plants around the yard in such a way that I can make use of the location and other factors to maximize the daytime heating of pots to reduce the number of times a given plant has to be protected. Of course, the raw temperatures don't mean anything without taking the length of freezes into account. I guess the information above applies to short term freezes (one or two nights). My goal during the winter is minimizing the amount of work I have to do to keep things alive. In some cases that means building a structure around some tree (e.g. mango trees) in other cases it means wait and see what happens and protect if the forecast is low enough (e.g. limequat).

I hope this helps in understanding.


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

Congratulation Mostro! that is not an easy feat with your cold winters. I have a few questions for you. How old is your nispero and how long did it take to fruit? Are you willing to sell some budwood from your Toledo and Bizcochelo seedlings? The Fairchild Botanical Gardens have a mature collection of Cuban varieties, including Bizcochelo. I was fortunate to try Bizcochelo y Toledo this year and they were mediocre at best nothing like the ones Cuba imports to Barcelona. Please email me about the budwood we might be able to trade I have an interesting collection with about 25 varieties, one of them a Mango Chino from Santa Clara Cuba which will be available in the next couple of years.


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

* How old is your nispero and how long did it take to fruit?
Last week, I moved my Makok sapodilla to a 30 gallon pot from the 12 gallon pot it was in. I've had it for around 2.5 years and it has the most beautiful
shape. I've never had to prune it and it is perfectly balanced all around.
This year, I picked around 120 fruits so far and there is about ten more on the tree. The fruits have been ripening since early May without taking a break.
The tree is healthy, drought tolerant, and seems very productive. Needless to say, I love my Makok!
I don't know about other people's experiences with Makok, but my tree seems to flower almost continuously from May until September. Every time it has new
growth, it flowers again and sets more fruit.
The picture I posted is from back in April of this year.

* Are you willing to sell some budwood from your Toledo and Bizcochelo seedlings?
At this time, I'm not interested in selling budwood from either tree. However, I would be cool with sharing, free of charge, but we definitely have
to coordinate the process to improve the chances of success.

* Mango chino for trade?
I am definitely interested, I've never had it and would like to try it.
How did you get your mango chino?

* I was fortunate to try Bizcochelo y Toledo this year and they were mediocre at best...
I've never had a bizcochuelo here in the US, but I've had many Toledos from my father's tree in Miami and the mangos are kind of watery, definitely
not anywhere as good as the ones from Santiago. My potted Toledo is better, but still not like the ones I eat when I visit Cuba.
I hope that the fruits from my Bizcochuelo tree are as good as the ones from the mother tree, but even in Cuba, on rainy years, mangos are not as good
as on normal years. My grandfather always says that mangos from really wet years are for pigs!


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

mostro,
what spray program do you use for your citrus. My citrus gets leaf minors even though I spray them with neem oil often.
Also, for potted mangoes could you please share which fertilizer do you use and what is the size for your pots?


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

Hello Fruit.Lover:
* what spray program do you use for your citrus. My citrus gets leaf minors even though I spray them with neem oil often.

Yeah, the neem oil is very effective for a lot of bugs, but not for miners. The miners live/eat inside the leaf tissue, so the neem never gets in contact with them. You have to use some type of systemic insecticide. Insecticides containing imidacloprid are extremely effective and appear to have relatively low toxicity for
mammals. I *only* use the spray kind (not the soil formulation) and I make significant efforts to apply it only to the new growth, in order to minimize the amount of imidacloprid that ends up in the fruit. Also, I *never* spray flowering citrus, because bees and other insects would then be killed.

* Also, for potted mangoes could you please share which fertilizer do you use and what is the size for your pots?

. currently my largest mango pots are 18 gallons. I plan to up pot them to 30 gallons for their final home.
. I buy a generic soluble fertilizer (24:7:15+micro-nutrients and add potassium chloride and Magnesium sulfate to convert it into a more balanced formulation. I apply a micronutrient spray twice during the winter months.
I use one table spoon of potassium and one of magnesium per every six table spoons of generic 24:7:15 (usually the Miracle Grow from HD). I've used that method for years and it has worked perfectly. the only thing I change is the amount I use, depending on the species in question. For example, citrus typically respond to higher fertilization levels than mangos...
I spend about 15 dollars per year on soluable fertilizer for all of my potted plants, so it is also cost effective.

good luck...


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

  • Posted by irun5k St. Pete, FL (My Page) on
    Sun, Sep 9, 12 at 15:12

Great yard!

I lived in Jax for many years and for those who don't know... mostro is doing something amazing here. It gets COLD there. I grew up in Central FL and when I move to Jax I couldn't believe the climate difference. (Just as I can't believe the difference between Central FL and St. Petersburg.)

Mostro, is that a recent photo of your Makok? If so, when did those fruit set and when is your typical harvest? My tree is filled with fruit also but they are marble sized at the largest.

Thanks again for the photos.


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

Irun5k,
Thanks for all of the nice comments. It is a lot of work, but it's also very rewarding. The cold is not as bad as other problems. For example, I had super productive plum trees and lost them over peach tree borers and nematodes. My three beautiful guava trees also went south because of massive nematode infestations. So, cold sucks, but there is always something you can do about it as long as you play your cards right...

The picture of the Makok was taken back in April. The fruits started ripening in May and I just ate the last one this morning. Currently, the tree has about 150 marble sized fruits and smaller, plus it is still flowering.
I just wanted to post a picture where the tree is well fruited, to show that it can be done. The rest of the pictures are from right now.


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

Mostro.... I am very impressed! Really nice fruit trees and orchids... Cngrats on an endless job well done.
Marin


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

Mostro great job with your fruit trees. I was impressed with your Makok. I was thinking of getting a Molix but now I am having second thoughts after seen what a good job you have done with your Makok Sap. Keep up the good work.


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

looks like a Q/A session here... let me add another Q regarding your potted fruit trees, particularly mangos, do you recall if you just used store bought soil or your own mixture? If your own, mind share the recipe, thanks Mos!


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RE: Some pictures from around the yard

* marinfla:
Thanks for all of the nice comments, it is a lot of work, but the rewards are even more!

* cuban007:
Yeah, the Makok has been a wonderful tree to own. I would totally recommend to anyone, especially someone that has to protect the tree in winter. I did a preliminary count of the fruits on my Makok and I came up with around 200 fruits currently (the tree will be three years old in December).

* charleslou23:
In general, my potted trees are planted in around 80% yard sand with the remaining 20% comprised of coffee grounds, oak leaves, pine bark, and some random amount of grass clippings. I don't usually buy soil, but I often recycle soil from one pot to another. Of course, I am careful not to spread pathogens, so when in doubt, I just trash the soil instead of reusing it.
Mango trees I usually plant in plain yard sand without any organic additives at all. They are not too demanding when it comes to soil, as long as there is some amount of drainage and the ph is not too low. I am lucky that the sand in my yard has a ph of 7, so it is good to use for almost any plant with little change. I know my mango trees grow without issues when planted directly in it...

I hope that helps.


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