Return to the Tropical Fruits Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Thai mango varieties

Posted by musaboru (My Page) on
Sun, Nov 7, 10 at 20:54

I noticed in another thread that Mango Kush was asking for a list of Thai variety names. I thought I might help start it. This is definitely not a complete list. And I compiled it from multiple Thai sites.

Falan (fah-lun) - "sky burst"
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Maha Chanok (ma-haa chah-noke) - not a helicopter (chinook). This is named after Maha-Janaka of Buddhist Jataka tales and is pronounced Maha Chanok in Thai. Has a red blush on ripe
Image and video hosting by TinyPicImage and video hosting by TinyPic

Nam Dok Mai (num doke my) - means "flower water" or nectar
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Nam Dok Mai Si Thong (num doke my see tong) - "Gold-colored" version of above
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Chok Anan (choke ah-nun) - means luck of Ananda or luck of infinity, probably someone's name
Image and video hosting by TinyPicImage and video hosting by TinyPic

Thong Dam (tong dum) - "black gold"
Image and video hosting by TinyPicImage and video hosting by TinyPic

Khiaw Sawoei (kiew sa-weuy) - "green eating"
Image and video hosting by TinyPicImage and video hosting by TinyPic

Okrong (oak rohng) - I'm not sure how to translate this, but it could mean something like "chest canal"
Image and video hosting by TinyPic


Okrong Thong (oak rohng tong) - Golden Okrong
Image and video hosting by TinyPicImage and video hosting by TinyPic

Okrong Phikun Thong (oak rong pee-goon tong) - Okrong that is like a "golden bakul flower"
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Raed - also may be spelled rad, red, etc. it means rhinoceros
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Yai Klam (yai glum) - Grandmother (Klam?)
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Nang Klang Wan (nung klarn wun) - "matinee"
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

_____________
One site said this picture was Nam Dok Mai, another said it was Nang Klang Wan. I am not sure what it is but it's a nice picture...
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Top row, left to right: Thong Dam, Nam Dok Mai
Bottom row, left to right: Nang Klang Wan, Khiaw Sawoei
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Pictures were taken from various sites and are used her for the purpose of illustrating the difference in appearance of mango varieties. I tried my best to make sure the picture is of the mango variety listed.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Wow this is a fantastic list! The translations and pronunciations are very helpful too!


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

great, i often wondered if okrung pikung tong was distinct, now i know it is.

in your opinion which variety is the sweetest? i tried okrung tong and i couldnt believe how sweet it was.

im pretty sure the nam doc mai we commonly grow here is the golden version.

the raed mango has an interesting protusion, ive never seen that on another mango. i see why they call it rhino, thats so neat, thanks so much.


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Thanks so much for the posting. I am assuming that you are Thai. I am very appreciative of your comments. Regarding Okrung.....possibly meaning "chest canal", that would make total sense as one of the main distinguishing characteristics of Okrung is an indentation along one side of the length of the fruit. Its sort of a cleft and could easily be described as a "canal." Your post gives me some assurance that the names that I have been using......with the exception of some minor spelling differences due to tranliteration from Thai to English, have been correct as they were originally reported to me from my source in Thailand many years ago. I do still have one mystery that is supposedly of Thai origin. One of the grafted trees that was sent back to me had a label on it which was somewhat hard to read. The best I could make it out, it was "Dian Guaw." Since the tree has fruited over the years, I have mentioned the mango by this name to various mango experts. No one has any clue what it is or means. Even my original source in Thailand was unable, years after the fact, to verify the name, the source or provide a translation. For all I know, this may be someone's name. Perhaps, it was purchased by my source years ago with the name of someone else on it who was supposed to be the purchaser of the plant. Or maybe I have it misspelled. Anyway, any insight or thoughts about this would be greatly appreciated.

Harry


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Dian Gaew sounds like a thai mango name

Gaew Yaak

Gaew Lek

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.simply-thai.com/Thai-Market_Fruit_Mango.htm


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Thanks for the try, Bryan.....but that mango looks nothing like the one I have. I'll post pictures when I have fruit this year.

Harry


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

I didnt think they were your variety, the names are too different. just wanted to reaffirm the word "Gaew" is not uncommon in Thai mango names leading me to believe it was a mango name on the label you read.


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Bryan:

See, I read your post too fast and missed your point......and your point seems to be well made. So maybe it isn't the name of another customer who was going to buy the plant. I am anxious to see what Musaboru has to say about it.

Harry


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Harry, while I'm not Thai, I am quite familiar with Thai language, especially the script more. The romanization you found seems to be too corrupt for me to figure out...sorry. I tried looking through a Thai dictionary also to no avail.

Like Mango Kush said, guaw could be a corruption of Gaew/Kaew, but I somewhat doubt this is the case since all of the Thai varieties I could find with this word Gaew (crystal) has it occuring as a first word rather than a second word. The closest term I know of is "Duang Kaew" but there's no mango named that.

Could you come up with any more variations of what this tag could have read?

Mango Kush, there is actually several cultivars named Nam Dok Mai plus another adjective after. The same is true for Okrong, there are way more than the ones I listed. And funny enough, I've only ever tasted supermarket mangoes here in California. :):)

Dar


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

i started to figure that, Asian mangos tend to have a lot of seedling strains it seems. the same happens when they are planted here in the New World with manilla seedlings in Mexico being dubbed distinct names like Champagne

i can understand how it may be difficult to read English written by someone of Thai origin, their script is very different from our script and letters can be ambiguous.


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Here is another Thai Mango. This is a new introduction (about a year or so) to Thailand. It is called Yai Grom:

Yai Grom Mango


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

in the original post there is a picture of a mango labeled
"Yai Klam (yai glum) - Grandmother (Klam?)"

I have a feeling with various thai to english spelling translations this may be your mango


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Bryan, the Yai Klam is elongated. The Yai Grom is round. Once I have a mango on the tree, I will post a picture of it. :)

Adiel


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

wow great thread about thai mangoes. really appreciate it for the information about them.been searching about thai mangoes description in english but could not find them


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Yai = Big
Grom = Round

I know Thai. In this case, Yai is not Gradma.


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

gotsomerice, how's your mun kun si mango doing right now? is this variety a disease resistance, cold hardy?


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

All of them are doing fine, despite the sub-zero temp in Jan. some of them are blooming now. Although my Nam Doc Mai looking ratty, but it was quite a young plant. How are yours?


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

Gotsomerice, my NDM new branches were all dried frosted so as my maha chinook 2 branches because I did not cover theme during the cold weather. I will cover them next year. I am interested to buy mun kun si mango that is why I was asking you the characteristic on this mango variety.


 o
RE: Thai mango varieties

This is what Mun Kun Si looks like today.

image


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Tropical Fruits Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here