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Trailing plants for retaining wall.

Posted by JParadise81 North Texas (My Page) on
Fri, Apr 27, 12 at 10:56

I have 60' of retaining wall that I would like to be covered with a trailing vine or plant. The wall gets full sun and I must plant at the top, hence the need for a cascading or trailing vine/plant. I have a soaker hose running along there so water isnt an issue. I would prefer something perennial that flowers. I have purple winter creeper on the top of it, but its not trailing down the sides like I had joped. Any ideas?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Trailing plants for retaining wall.

Until you find the perfect vine, or until the perfect perennial vine fills in you could plant some sweet potato vine for this summer. Its really cheap and easy to find.

How tall is this wall? How far (down) do you want the trailing to go?


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RE: Trailing plants for retaining wall.

Creeping wire vine (Muehlenbeckia) will give you the effect you are looking for. I have some in a container going on 4 years, and it trails over the sides nicely. I have it in morning sun. What I don't know for sure is, if your sun situation would be too much for it. It is supposed to be marginally hardy here, (some sites list it as an annual) but so far mine has done well through DFW winters. 60' is a pretty long retaining wall. To keep anything from looking too blah, it might be a good idea to have several plants/vines at different parts along the wall to provide more interest. Depends on if it is a visible area or more of a background where blah would be fine as long as it's reliable and low maintenance.

Here is a link that might be useful: Creeping wire vine


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RE: Trailing plants for retaining wall.

The wall tapers from about 7' at the right side to ground level at the left side. It is basically one whole side of my backyard so I dont want it to be too blah. I'll look into the creeping wire vine, thanks. I'd like the trailing to go to the ground if possible.


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RE: Trailing plants for retaining wall.

I love the look of Dichondra (silver pony-foot) trailing over containers and walls. Not sure of cold hardiness. I've seen Plumbago Auriculata beautifully cascading over walls both in full sun and in partial sun. I would consider seeding bluebonnets to grow thru the fall and bloom in the spring before the plumbago returns. Lantanas and blueboonets are also a good combo...one going dormant while the other starts to wake up.
Molly


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RE: Trailing plants for retaining wall.

I've got some Wandering Jew that will trail a bit -- so it might be better for the shorter portion of the wall. I just cleared out a bed, and I have several plants that you can have if you'll come pick it up.

~ freshair


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RE: Trailing plants for retaining wall.

My choices for this type of spot would be Purple Clematis (Clematis pitcheri) on the tall side transitioning to Winecup (Callirhoe involucrata) as the wall nears the ground.

Ty


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RE: Trailing plants for retaining wall.

Freshair - that would be great! Where are you located? You can email me at Justin.paradise@gmail.com. Thanks!


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RE: Trailing plants for retaining wall.

Irene rosemary or prostrate rosemary, Ornamental oregano like Kent beauty or any of the others.


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RE: Trailing plants for retaining wall.

As Freshair suggests, Wandering Jew (presumably Tradescantia pallida) isn't likely to trail very far. It's quite brittle. I'd be careful handling it, because it can cause skin irritation. I understand that, in times past, it was used to redden the cheeks (in lieu of pinching, I suppose.)

I once planted one of the suggestions, coral honeysuckle, alongside Japanese honeysuckle, and trained both up a trellis to cover the roof of a gazebo. Bonehead idea. When I became concerned that the weight of the vines was going to cause the roof to collapse, I stopped watering it. It didn't take long for the coral honeysuckle to gracefully expire, but its Japanese counterpart didn't even notice. Finally had to take Roundup to it. It's "invasive," of course, but I don't offhand see how it could do much damage in a confined area.


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