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Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Posted by mangohouston 9b (My Page) on
Wed, Jul 14, 10 at 11:05

HI,

I had purchased a Malika Mango plant in a 3Gallon container and would like to plant in theground. Could you give me tips on hos to plant and take care of the Mango plant/tree during the occassional freeze in Houston, TX.

Thanks

Mango Houston
mangohouston@yahoo.com


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Well I would make a hole rwice as wide as the container of the tree, as deep as the conatiner, place your tree in the whole, fill up the hole with rich nutrient dirt water really well to get rid of air pockets, water every other day for at least 10 days so that the tree stablish itself. care for freeze- I would purchase tube foam insulation, the kind that is used to protect pipes,wrap around the trunk of the tree and then use a burlap bag to cover the insulation, and for the leafy part just throw a blanket over that part, Maybe some one has better sugestion that mine. Marcie_new


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Where in Houston are you?

I would plant it on the south side of my house, about 3 feet away from the foundation. Marcie's trunk wrap is a good idea, and I would also build a frame to allow for covering the whole tree with blanket and plastic during a freeze (plastic on top). On particularly cold freezes like we had last winter (28 or less, especially for more than a few hours), I would also run an extension chord to under the frame with a 100 watt bulb (some use C9 Christmas lights).

If you are willing to do the work on the 10 or so coldest nights every winter, you should have a a great tree for the rest of the year!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Always check all the websites. I use my Genealogy program to keep information on all my plants for a quick reference. I copy and paste into my Notes. I have created a file just for plants and also keep records of my successes and failures. I find this is the easiest and cheapest Gardening program out there, plus I do use it for Genealogy so I get more use out of my program. This would work for almost any record keeping except maybe your check book.

HOME FRUIT PRODUCTION--MANGO
Julian W. Sauls
Extension Horticulturist

Mango is regarded as the queen of fruits in tropical areas of the world. Prior to the severe freezes of the 1980s, numerous mango trees were in production in yards across the lower Rio Grande Valley, including a small orchard near Mercedes. Grown for its large, colorful and delicious fruit, the medium to large evergreen mango tree is also attractive in the home landscape. Its rounded canopy may be low and dense to upright and open, with dark green foliage that is long and narrow.

Climate

Mango is adapted to lowland tropical and subtropical areas. Winter temperature is a major consideration, as leaves and twigs, especially on younger trees, can be damaged at temperatures below 30 degrees. Flowering and fruiting are seriously affected at temperatures below 40 degrees during bloom. There is no apparent difference in cold hardiness among varieties.

Soil and Site Selection

Mango requires soil having good internal drainage, but is not particular as to soil type. Trees can tolerate minor flooding, but have low tolerance for salts, boron and lawn herbicides. Because of its extreme sensitivity to cold, mango should be planted in the most protected site in the yard--within 8 to 12 feet of the south or east side of the house. The tree must receive full sun for optimum growth and fruiting.

Varieties

There are two principal types of mangos: Indian and Indo-chinese. Varieties of the Indian type typically have monoembryonic (single embryo) seeds, highly colored fruit and are subject to anthracnose disease. Those of the Indochinese type have polyembryonic seeds (multiple embryos), and fruit usually lacking in coloration, but they may have some resistance to anthracnose. There are some varieties, however, that do not fit clearly into either group.

Varietal choices in Texas are limited. More common commercial varieties include 'Haden', a red and yellow fruit of about a pound and quarter that matures in June; 'Irwin', a red mango of just under a pound that matures in June; 'Tommy Atkins', a red and yellow fruit comparable to 'Haden' in size and maturity; 'Kent', a green, red and yellow mango of about a pound and a half in size that matures in July; and 'Keitt', a green and pink mango of a pound and half that matures in August.

Other varieties may be equally acceptable; for example, 'Julie' and 'Manila' are probably of better eating quality than the more brightly-colored commercial types.

Propagation

Polyembryonic types generally come true from seed, which is the common method of propagation in the tropics. Monoembryonic types do not come true from seed, so they must be grafted onto seedling rootstocks, using almost any available mango seeds.

The fibrous stone or pit should be removed from the seed. The seed should be planted concave edge down and about 1 inch deep in any good potting soil. Germination may take two to three weeks; graftable seedlings of a quarter inch diameter take about six months.

Veneer or side veneer grafting and chip budding are the most successful methods of propagation. Most propagation occurs in winter, using rootstocks grown from the previous summer's production. Cleft grafting is also practiced.

Planting

Because of frequent freezes, mango trees may not achieve maximum size, so they can be spaced 12 to 15 feet from each other or other trees.

Because trees are normally grown in containers of soilless media, much of the outer layer of media should be washed off the sides and top of the root ball immediately prior to setting the tree in the ground. This practice exposes the outer part of the root system to the actual soil in which the tree must grow, thereby enhancing tree establishment. Newly planted trees should be staked for support for the first year.

Build a water ring several inches high and thick atop the soil around the tree. The ring should be a little wider than the planting hole--take soil from elsewhere in the yard if there's not enough left over from planting. Fill the basin with water--after it soaks in, a little soil may be needed to fill in holes made as the soil settles around the root system.

Young Tree Establishment

Newly planted trees should be watered two or three times the first week, then once or twice per week for several weeks. Simply fill the water basin and let the water soak in. The water ring will gradually erode away over four to six months, at which time the tree can be considered established.

Delay fertilization until new growth occurs after planting, then apply monthly into September. Scatter the fertilizer on the ground under the tree and promptly water thoroughly. Using ammonium sulfate (21-0-0), use one half cup monthly in the first year, one cup per month in the second and two cups monthly in the third year. For other fertilizer analyses, adjust the rate accordingly.

All lawn grass and weeds should be eliminated for several feet around the young mango, as the tree cannot compete for water and nutrients until it is much larger. As the tree grows, widen the grass-free area beyond the canopy. Organic mulches are excellent for mango trees.

No pruning or training should be necessary except to remove deadwood.

Winter frost protection is essential. Soil banks around the young tree trunk provide excellent protection--they should be put up in early December and removed in early March. Young trees can also be draped with a blanket or similar covering just prior to a predicted cold spell--pull the corners outward and anchor them to the ground. It is not necessary that the cover reach the ground. Any additional, practical heat source under the tented tree will probably save even the foliage. Incandescent lights, electric heaters, camp lanterns or stoves are good heat sources.

Mature Tree Care

Cultural practices are designed to maintain good growth and production. Irrigation, nutrition, and weed and grass control are the major practices in mature mango tree care.

Irrigation is the same as for other established fruit and nut trees--water slowly, deeply and thoroughly. Repeat as needed, based on soil type and prevailing weather. Weekly soakings during the summer are more than adequate.

Fertilization, using 21-0-0, should be at the rate of one to two cups per inch of trunk diameter per year, split into equal applications in February, May and August. Simply scatter the fertilizer on the soil surface under the tree, then water thoroughly.

Weed and grass control under the tree is desirable to reduce competition and can be easily maintained by use of organic mulch replenished as necessary.

The only pruning necessary is to remove dead or damaged branches, which will occur following major freezes unless excellent cold protection methods are practiced. Then, pruning should be delayed until the extent of freeze damage can be ascertained.

Production, Maturity and Use

Grafted trees will begin to produce in the third year after establishment, with mature trees capable of producing three to five bushels.

The mango fruit develops rapidly, as the time from flowering to maturity is only 100 to 150 days, depending upon variety. Mangoes will ripen to best quality on the tree. Mangoes can be harvested at color break and ripened in the kitchen. Color break is the change from pure green to yellow, usually on the blossom end of the fruit. Another indicator of maturity is a change in color of the flesh around the seed from white to yellow.

Fresh consumption is the most important use of mango, but the fruit can be frozen, dried or canned Mango can be used in jams, jellies, preserves, pies, chutney and ice cream. Green mangoes are sometimes eaten raw in the tropics.

Problems

The largest problem of mango is anthracnose because it attacks all parts of the tree and is probably most damaging to the flower panicles. On maturing fruit, the fungus causes irregular black spots that may be sunken slightly and show surface cracks. A grouping of spots forms a large, damaged area. Tear streaking is common, resulting from fungal spores that wash down the fruit from infected twigs or flower stalks. The disease can be controlled with fungicides.

Powdery mildew can be a serious problem under conditions of high humidity and rainfall during bloom because the disease would limit fruit set. Serious defoliation would not be expected under Texas conditions.

Mites and scale insects can attack mango trees, but they rarely limit growth or production unless populations build to high levels.

. Here's a short briefing:
Mango trees have been cultivated and grafted for hundreds of years. Grafting was a 'secret' in many cultures and tasty mangoes were status symbols for the royalty only. Ancient kings would steal limbs off each others' mango trees and bribe and kidnap the other kings' gardeners. Peasants were beheaded for possession of mango fruit or unauthorized cultivation of mango fruit trees. Royalty would try to surpass each other with lavish mango parties and huge gifts of perfect, ripe, delicious mango fruits. Some of today's Indochinese awesome varieties existed many, many years ago exactly as we have them now.
Mango trees are evergreens. Their leaves make superior mulch.

The civilized grafted mango trees we have now are nothing like the ancient, wild trees whose small fruit tasted like turpentine and had the texture of nylon yarn. The old test of a mango fruit was it's stringiness, it's fiber content. You used to judge a mango by how much dental floss it had. The advent of the science of grafting changed all that.

Mango fruit from seeds is never the same as the mother tree's fruit. So the seed out of a great tasting fruit will likely produce a tree yielding horrible tasting fibrous fruit. The only certain way to be sure you'll have tasty fruit is to propagate (by grafting, and in some cases cloning) an existing particular, individual tree (DNA-wise) whose quality is proven.

The odds of a seed producing worthwhile fruit are very, very small.

All mango trees grown from any seed are properly called "Wild Mango Trees".

All good tasting mango varieties are grafted. It's easy with younger trees to see the graft...just look near the base of the trunk and you can see a scar that circles all the way around the trunk. Older trees have the scar too if they are grafted, it's just harder to see.

Watch out for grafted trees that have been frozen back to the stump and all the top (good) part of the graft (scion) has died of the freeze and only the rootstock has survived and branched...such trees, if they do live and re-grow, produce very inferior fruit. It is a good citizen's duty to kill these "fruiting wounded" so that people sampling mangoes for the first time will not taste their unpleasant "free" fruits and form an aversion to all mangoes.

Grafting Is When You Artificially Attach a Tiny Proto-Limb (Bud) of a Desirable Tree to the Lower Trunk of a Similar Tree, Usually a Sapling, Thereby Prolonging the Life and Fruiting Ability of the Desirable Tree. THIS CAN RESULT IN A SINGLE DESIRABLE TREE'S DNA BEING USED FOR AN INDEFINITELY LONG TIME! Like possibly thousands of years!

Sometimes young trees sprout limbs from BELOW the graft's scar, always kill these limbs because they will produce bad tasting fruits and weaken the good scion above the graft.

Grafting occurs in nature, for example, when two trees growing too close together constantly rub limbs in the wind scraping them both bare at one spot and they both 'bleed' sap and when the windy season ends they are still pressed together and grow 'joined' together over months into one tree. Grafted. There is this type of 'joining' in root systems too.

Click Here for a Short Movie on How to Graft

Most of the mango varieties you find in the supermarket are not ancient. (The best mangoes never make it to a grocery store.) These modern varieties taste great and are resistant to some problems. The newest varieties are often 'designed' to taste like other fruits such as coconuts, lemons, vanilla, ice cream etc.

Generally, modern mango tree varieties are superior in every way to the ancient ones.

Except the Nam Doc Mai, a treasured survivor from ancient Siam (Thailand), which politely delivers indescribably delicious fruit, one limb-full at a time, over the course of the year, thus providing a long, manageable supply rather than bestowing a few hundred pounds of mangoes during about six weeks time as is usual with most varieties.

Here are some APPROXIMATE dates of recognition:
Haden..........1898
Tommy Adkins...........1915
Kent..................1925
Zill.......................1940

Temperature is very important with mango trees. Cold weather is a major health factor. They die or suffer great damage at 32 F. They go temporarily dormant at about 40 F. So you must learn the normal yearly temperature pattern for where the tree will be.

The idea that there is a "coldhardy" rootstock or cultivar is absurd. All mango trees behave exactly the same way as regards 32 F. They die or suffer great damage.

Here are some cold weather ideas. In some places the threat of frost or freeze is normal only at night for a few nights each year. You can either keep the tree in a container and drag it inside during the hours of frost or freeze or plant it in the ground where you will have to cover it up for only the duration of the frost or freeze. If you cover it be sure to fasten the 'skirt' to the ground all around with sod staples so as to trap the ground warmth radiating upward, you can add a light bulb for added warmth or even a little electric space heater...just watch out for rain. Also where the covering tarp/plastic touches the tree the freeze will 'burn' it, no big deal usually, but you can get elaborate and build a skeleton frame to stretch the cover over, just remember the wind. Remember to open a vent hole or uncover the mango tree in the morning after temperatures get back above 40 F. You could 'cook' it if you forget.

In Northern Florida they used to plant mango trees right up against the South side of the house where the hot water heater was, so the tree kept warm at night. During cold weather, even if there was a killer freeze and some limbs died, the trunk above the graft was still warm and would sprout new limbs and yield delicious fruit in the Spring.

In an emergency, you can heat just the trunk, (it will save the graft and the tree), you will be sacrificing all but one of the scion's branches. But it will save the life of a grafted tree.

There are several ways to heat it: put hot wet towels, electric heating pads, an electric blanket, or hot water bottles, etc. wrapped around the trunk clear up to a few inches ABOVE the first branch. And put some warm water on the ground near the base of the trunk. Remember you must save at least one limb (small is OK) ABOVE the graft or else the tree is worthless.

It is possible to use sprinklers to spray water onto a tree to save it. BUT you must not stop spraying until the temperature is up to 36 F. Don't just stop the water at dawn. You can try to divert the flowing water away from the base of the tree and the roots with plastic sheeting, (mango trees like dry winters).

In places where it freezes all night and all day you must keep the tree inside the house near a big South facing window (for light) until the frost threat is over. Lots of light is the main concern. You can phone your local NOAA weather station and they will read you the historically earliest and latest freeze dates in your area so you know about what date to drag it inside. Of course a sunny, heated greenhouse or pool house is nice!

Mango trees like a dry spell for a couple months in the winter.

Water the tree every 3 days for the first month if you plant it in the earth. Then every week for the next 2 months. Then don't water it any more except for dry spells.

When it's mature, don't water very much or fertilize at all during the time when fruit are forming or ripening, you'll burst the fruit or dilute the flavor.

Don't let small trees have fruit for 2-4 years. Keep sniping the fruits off when they are golf ball size...fruiting drains the vigor and growth.

Have you ever seen a mango tree with more weight in flowers than tree? Yes, it happens. The excess weight of flowers or fruits can break off limbs and really ruin a tree. You may have to support young trees and trees that have a bumper crop with lumber or ropes. Be creative and over-engineer everything. Don't ding up the bark, wrap old water hose or panty hose so it's cushioned where the support touches the tree.

Pruning to remove dangerous excess weight of inflorescences or fruits is OK. Otherwise forget it. You can really mess up the life of a tree fast with just a few uneducated cuts.

Any needed cuts to the tree should be made with sharp clean tools.

Some growers use a hand held one quart propane torch (hardware store) to quickly sterilize the knife or scissors after each cut so as to not spread virus disease.

Don't burn mango leaves or cuttings, the smoke is toxic. Also don't allow animals to eat the leaves.

For the first 3 years apply about one level tablespoon of 12-5-9 (scattered) per foot of tree height in fall after all the fruit have been picked. After the tree is three years old start using 4-4-8 with trace elements, apply about 1/4 cup once yearly after all fruit are picked. Fertilizer is mixed with a gallon of warm water and applied to the DAMP soil, not dry, not wet. Apply about a quart daily for four days. Mango trees need less fertilizer than the same area of lawn grass!

A 'citrus' type all purpose spray (lots of different brands, but we recommend Exxon 435 soluble oil) is good to spray every month with the Kocide (copper sulfate).

And get yourself a decent sprayer that makes a fine mist.

And get some 'Kocide' (brand name for copper sulfate) from a garden shop and spray the trees thoroughly in humid/warm conditions twice a week! Follow the directions on the bag. Add a teaspoonful of dish detergent in each sprayer load to make it stick.

Anthracnose is the condition that spoils the fruit. Look for black dots on the fruit and leaves and the growing tips die curling black. Spray Kocide. Spray twice a week. In Florida or other humid places spray twice a week all year. Don't let the copper sulfate drip on to the roots, use plastic and rags or paper towels to keep it off the soil over the roots. It is good for the above ground parts only.

Death to all squirrels! And rats! ...Get some dogs.

Mango trees come from poor, sandy soil with alternating monsoons and droughts. Lots of hot sun. Few nutrients. Since it survives under very harsh conditions you need only keep it from freezing. It's close cousin is the cashew nut tree.

If your mango tree's in a pot, check the moisture every week. Stick your finger into the soil, is it damp? Stick your finger into one of the holes around the bottom of the pot, is there moisture at all? Water thoroughly only if dry. The soil should go from very wet to very dry, then back to very wet. And so forth.

DO NOT TRY TO KEEP THE SOIL IN ANY POTTED PLANT OR TREE SLIGHTLY DAMP ALL THE TIME.
Go back and forth from real wet to real dry.
REASON: BECAUSE THE VARIOUS PATHOGENS CANNOT ADAPT TO THE EXTREME CHANGES IN MOISTURE AND IT KILLS LOTS OF THEM. And with no chemicals and no labor!

Roots need air just like they need water.

It's always good to "spin" a potted plant halfway around every month so as to give it sunlight equally all around and help it grow straight.

FOR PLANTS, SUNLIGHT IS FOOD.
Not enough means less growth, less flowering and less fruiting. The more hours of daily direct sunlight...the more tree growth, flowering and fruiting. Also if you reposition the potted tree suddenly, sunburn and leaf dropping can occur because of any change in the amount of light. Sometimes a little leaf dropping isn't too bad. Acclimation to lighting changes takes weeks and months.

If you want to keep a non-dwarf mango tree small, don't up-pot it. Make it pot bound.

Just like Bonsai?

Yes, Mango trees are perfect for Bonsai. They were some of the first subjects for the art form. Imagine a six inch tall mango tree that's 30 years old and has a ripe 3 lb. fruit on it!

("Julie" is the true dwarf and will get only 8 ft. high. "Cogshall" is the semi-dwarf mango tree and can reach 12 ft. Also there is a new "Hawaiian Dwarf Mango" to try!)

If you are serious about mangoes, then you'll want to know about proper spacing in a grove. Plant "Keitt" variety, space them about 35 ft. apart in long rows running North and South. Space the rows about 45 ft. apart so as to leave space to drive a tractor pulling a big grove sprayer. "Keitt" fruits get to 4 lbs., ship well, taste terrific, have no fiber at all, are resistant to anthracnose, it's a huge tall tree, rave, rave.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Thanks Marci, John and Walli. I live in Katy, TX and this is my first Mango atempt. I plan to plant in groung and shall use the foam insulation and shall use the light bulb methodology to keep the plant warm.

I grow a lot of Indian Bananas. During winter, the top 2 feet if the tree (including all leaves) gets decayed. I chop about one foot below the decay, in March and the tree starts from there.

Thanks again


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

if the winter temp is a cold for long periods as it was last winter, your biggest concern will be the cold. DO plenty of research on the type you want to plant. Make sure you look at the cold hardiness zones. ood luck


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Good to see I'm not the only one growing mangos in Texas. I'm in Sugar Land. I first experimented with just planting seeds on the ground to see how mangoes liked our soil, and what sort of damage to expect from our winters. To my surprise, they liked our soil just fine (no need to add any special soil when you plant it, let it get use to your native soil from the get go). My seedlings grew fine during spring, but where totally decimated during 2009-2010 winter's (it was expected). So spring of 2010 I ordered my grafted tree from a nursery in Florida. I ordered a Glenn. Make sure you cut the leading tip/bud as soon as you plant it to encourage lateral branching, or you will end up with a tall leggy tree less likely to produce abundant fruit (youtube Mango Tree Tipping). You must offer protection against freezing temperatures -no way around this. Don't rely completly on planting it next to the wall or south side. What I did was built a PVC pipe frame around it, cover it with plastic covers (they sell the rolls on the painter's aisle at HD or Ls). Secure it to the ground and get a clamp-on lamp with 100w bulb for when it dips to the low 20s. So far the tree is doing just fine! Good luck.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Have any of you had success with mangos that are already producing good fruit on your tree(s)? If not, do you know of anyone in Houston that does? I understand that dealing with the soil, food, water, cold, etc. can be easier to accomplish than to achieve the ultimate goal of mango flowers become sizeable, delicious, impressive mangos to eat. When the annual compost pile mango seeds become young mango trees each year, I don't bother trying to care for them anymore .....since they easily die when the first frost visits.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

I am near Cypress TX. I have Alphonse, Mallika and Nam Doc Mai in ground and Carrie and Glen in containers. Last year I got 3 fruits from mallika- each was 1-1.5 lb and 7 fruits from Namdocmai.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Mangobaby - Do you do anything to protect your trees from the cold weather?


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

HI jlgarden,

I do protect the trees. You can see details here - http://clippings.gardenweb.com/clippings/mangobaby

Let me know if you have any questions.

Here is a link that might be useful: Frost protection method:


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

just wondering if any of you guys' mango survived last winter's cold freeze?

Saw some mango trees at Houston Garden at 1/2 off, im tempting to get a couple of glenn or maybe also kent.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

charleslou- GO FOR IT!!! I'd say get the Glenn, but Kent is good, too. Just cover them and wrap them with Christmas lights!!!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

mangobaby, quite the contraption to protect mangos/papayas. r ur trees still alive? producing fruit?


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Yes, they are all alive and healthy and loaded with flowers (specially namdocmai and alphonso) and wrapped in the structures for next 3 months. I got over 100 payapas this year - still quite a few left on the tree


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Mango baby where did u get the Alphonse mango plant


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

I ordered it online from nursery in florida but I think JRN sells it too


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

How about putting it in the corner of a greenhouse and making a Bonsai out of it? I haven't tried it yet, but that was the game plan.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Mangoes were a great success this year. I got 15+ Alphonse's, 5 Mallika, 2 Zills and 10+ NamDocmai's. Alphonso was the best tasting mango followed by Mallika and Namdocmai.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

what a beautiful tree!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

HEY Y'ALL!! Im not too far from y'all here just south of the westpark toll past TX 6 in clodine, great to see very good care in your mangoes! And I have some questions about mangobaby's winter setup:
1) do you cover the top of the trees with the cloth also or leave the top open?

2) do you still use christmas lights or use high heat bulbs, or color/frequency specific bulbs?

Im trying to save my 2nd mango (cogshall) from having the fate of my 1st mango (carrie) which I still dont know if it died due to being rootbound/fungicide burn/light depravation and sudden exposure/overfertilized etc. Etc..etc...
I will try not to "baby" it too much like the last but I sure dont want it or all the other plants in my recently acquired jungle to freeze if we get down in the 30s anytime soon. I would bring stuff inside but the cats may bite off a chunk and my soursop seedlings are already crowding my relatively small garage. The mango IS recently potted up to a 20 or 24 inch wide, almost knee-high container, havent measured exact dimensions.
Any help from anyone greatly appreciated!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Hi craze4mango,

Yes I cover the top of the mango too. Two of the mango trees have grown too big (over 9x9 feet) and I am not sure how I will protect them. I try to make sure there are no open gaps left when I cover the tree. I don't use Xmas lights, I use 3 90w floodlights instead as heat source. I will start building the structures around the trees this weekend.

I keep my potted mangoes in garage under LED lights. I got fruits from potted zill mango this year.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Hey Mangobaby,

Thanks for the info! At this point my cogshall is outside but will be coming in along w everything that is potted by 11/13 as I havent been able to take these larger measures.
My humble suggestion is to trim and seal the top branches of the tall trees, although it may not be the time for trimming.

Awesome to have fruit from a potted tree in the winter, hopefully the fruit develops good under bulb lighting? My tree barely shows branching buds but no flower buds so far.

One more question, what kind of lamp do you use? I assume regular lighting lamp, maybe outdoor rated? I got me a 150w garden light lamp that goes on a stake and put a 90w , 1900 lumen halogen floodlight but I put the mango between the house wall and a tarp i hung, but now I know not to use plastic as it will lower the temps and to enclose around completely..


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Happy new year to everyone!
Hope every mango tree is surviving this winter!

I wonder if any of yalls trees out there have problems with blackening of leaf margins and eventual leaf fall...im thinking it may be red algae but not sure.

We have a lot of oak trees in the area...could they be the culprit?

My cogshall has lost over half of its leaves because of this.
Any comments are appreciated!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

My Mango trees are happy under the structures/mini green houses. Are your mangoes ok after the freezes we had? I am not sure why your cogshall is having leaf drop. Was it exposed to the cold? Can you post some pics.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Hey mangobaby! great to hear of your success after 17-degree weather!!!

My cogshall lost about 80% of its leaves but is doing ok as it is pushing out new growth.
I bought it down in the valley at rivers end near brownsville, and about 2 weeks after i brought it, its leaves slowly got red-dark brown around the margin on the underside of the leaves. i will look for pics....
Eventually the spot grew and most leaves fell but stems are healthy green, applied copper spray and it delayed the fall of the remaining leaves although about 3 or 4 have fallen since. It has been in garage at no less than 40 degrees in the coldest nights and brought out for the 50-60 degree dry days, but leaves had been falling way before changes in lighting.

All my seedlings are ok although one was very affected by what seems like anthracnose. I have applied copper spray to all my seedlings.

im gonna try out setups like yours pretty soon to at least be ready for next winter because more trees are coming home soon & i need my garage space back-- its very addictive!!!

you got me interested in alphonso, I already had my eye on mallika & nam doc mai and then others in the blogs mention fairchild, pickering, cushman...etc... man i think i better buy some land with a big greenhouse lol!!

i wonder if youve had any problems with lancetillas splitting on your tree like the folks in Fla. have.

Thanks for your time and info, its great to hear from you!! keep me posted!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Hey mangobaby! I bet you are ready for spring! I deleted old pics of damaged leaves but i have recent pics of new growth on my cogshall mango ... the trick for me is uploading them from a tablet...


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Here are more pics... showing what i think is some kind of mineral deficiency in the soil:


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Here are more pics... showing what i think is some kind of mineral deficiency in the soil:


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Here is more...


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

More...


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

More...


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Yes, your mango can use some minerals. I recently using microlife, plant feed made here in houston and all organic . I left my mangos outside all winter and they did fine! Try that on your little baby!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Thanks alexisreal! I heard of microlife on the radio garden show iwill try that!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Wow alex, what type of mangos do you have that withstand 17 F degree weather??!! That seems extraordinary!

One thing i do wish to do regarding plant feed is finding ways to make my own organic plant feed without skimping out on the ever so important trace minerals...

Hey mangobaby, you got any blooms on your nam doc mai? The ones at JRN on harwin even had blooms coming out of stems near the soil!

Do tell us what mangos you got going alex!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Wow alex, what type of mangos do you have that withstand 17 F degree weather??!! That seems extraordinary!

One thing i do wish to do regarding plant feed is finding ways to make my own organic plant feed without skimping out on the ever so important trace minerals...

Hey mangobaby, you got any blooms on your nam doc mai? The ones at JRN on harwin even had blooms coming out of stems near the soil!

Do tell us what mangos you got going alex!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

What type of light do you use in the garage? The leaves look like baby leaves with light deficiency.

Namdocmai is just starting to bloom. Alphonso is blooming nicely - pic attached. I don't have lancetilla but nam doc Mai did have lot of fruit split last year.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Nice blooms mangobaby!

The only light my cogshall had all winter was from soft white light bulbs! Not even halogen, just typical bulb (yikes but true). It is staying outside now that temps dont go below 40s.

Everything else is also outside except for some soursop seedlings that really got the brunt of some kind of oak fungus from the oaks in the backyard. The 3 that survived are hanging on still.

Thinking of getting alphonso, carrie & mallika soon and cannot decide between fairchild, pickering, neelum and ice cream... kinda biased towards
Indian type mangos as you see!
May end up getting all eventually at the expense of my wife complaining of having no space in the backyard lolol :))) thats why i look at varieties that grow slow/dwarf some.

Have your or anyone elses mangos had problems around oak trees in the past? That will decide where i will plant my trees... hope to hear from any of yall!!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Nice blooms mangobaby!

The only light my cogshall had all winter was from soft white light bulbs! Not even halogen, just typical bulb (yikes but true). It is staying outside now that temps dont go below 40s.

Everything else is also outside except for some soursop seedlings that really got the brunt of some kind of oak fungus from the oaks in the backyard. The 3 that survived are hanging on still.

Thinking of getting alphonso, carrie & mallika soon and cannot decide between fairchild, pickering, neelum and ice cream... kinda biased towards
Indian type mangos as you see!
May end up getting all eventually at the expense of my wife complaining of having no space in the backyard lolol :))) thats why i look at varieties that grow slow/dwarf some.

Have your or anyone elses mangos had problems around oak trees in the past? That will decide where i will plant my trees... hope to hear from any of yall!!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Craze4mango, it is a Julie fruit and nom doc that did very well planted outside. I noticed that my cogshall that I did not plant in the ground really suffered, it received a lot of leaf burn but still ok. I attribute the difference to the mangos feeling better if planted in ground.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Hey alex and mangobaby!
Got questions for you mangobaby- when your alphonso has fruit, do you pick them mature green or do you let them ripen on the tree? Do you have problems with squirrels or other animals eating your fruit?

Alex! So your julie and nam doc made it with no protection at 17 Farhenheit!?! Wow, are they against a building getting heat from a wall or against a south facing wall?? Did you mulch heavy? Did you use ag covers like mangobaby? How old are your trees? Did you make them hardier with that winterizing plant food? Im trying to rationalize it... something gotta give right?! Lol but i would like to know what you do... being on the ground does have a lot to do though and the cogshall proves at least that much of what seems a puzzle to me!

Have you tasted fruit from those trees, and if so which do you like best? Any major disease problems with the julie tree?

Just got the last and almost forsaken mallika and a good looking alphonso from the nursery... two down and one to go.....or maybe two...!? I will very soon see if i bite off more than i can chew!

I'd like to hear from yall! Thanks!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Craze4mango, I really didn't do much. Just planted them in the ground when it was warm like September , I would plant them now because then they have time to establish and do well over winter. There's a larger mango tree I spotted in my neighborhood that's been there for years . I think we need to feel better about planting tropical a in houson. Heck , I've seen a plumeria tree in my neighborhood , it's huge . If it can make it then I bet other plants can too, I'll take pics ( last year I posted pics , search for "high density tropical garden in houston" and u should b able to see)


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Hey folks! Checking in on you mango fans to see how your sticks are coming along! Lol...

Since last i wrote i have added to my repertoir an alphonso and a mallika to accompany the cogshall, plus vegetables and grapevines.

Hope to get at least 2 more mango trees but my immediate concern is putting the mangos i already have into a clay soil...

So my question to any and all of yall is: did yall mend your soil? and if you did, with what? Or did yall plant on a mound, which i am inclined to do?

Anyone's response is appreciated! I will post pictures soon!
Enjoy the fruit of your labor!


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Mango season has been weird this year. None of my potted mangoes flowered so far, leaves only on some and some have not pushed any growth at all yet.

Alphonso mango has few flowers and has just a few fruits, most of the branches have not pushed any growth (17 mangos last year). Just a few fruits on mallika too.

Best one this year is NamDocMai, hundreds of flower panicles and lots of fruits are holding so far. Last year I had less than 10 fruits hold on this tree, hopefully this year will be much better.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Mallika fruit


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Hey mangobaby! I saw on another thread you lost 3 trees-- what a bummer!! Sorry to hear that!

Great to hear you are holding up w the nam doc and alphonso!

Mine are in 20 gal pots now but not for long...did you mend your soil for your alphonso n nam doc?
Thinking of using exp. Shale, cedar mulch and cow manure or peat humus mixed well with the clay soil of my yard...thinking about going up from the hole at least 6 inches...maybe going crazy with it but i still regret losing that carrie last year!

I have the cogshall, alphonso and mallika going into ground shortly. Carrie and neelum may be in the works soon along w soursop.

Also have a satsuma on ground w fruit set and also at the same time is budding more flowers that should blossom this week which i think seems uncommon (at least to me it does), got a brazos belle avocado w one fruit set which also needs a bigger container.

Got a lot on the garden plate to say the least!

Pics coming in after sun breaks out...


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Sun has been out for many hours now :-) looking forward to see some pics.
Lost those mangoes back in 09-10.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Sorry mangobaby! Took the pics early morning but couldnt upload as i had to start the sunday manic morning rush and just got home almost at 9pm! Here are the pics...

First all 3 mangos- from left to right-> cogshall, alphonso and mallika


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

The mallika is budding new leaves, no flower spikes seem to be coming yet. Some leaves seem to be deformed,will wait some to confirm and apply trace minerals yet again for 2nd time


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Alphonso has remained the same since i brought it from the nursery and repotted it. Applied trace minerals and some citrus star fert 12-10-10 slow release and trace mineral foliar spray...

This post was edited by craze4mango_tx on Sun, May 25, 14 at 22:43


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

The cogshall has kept the same growth and hasnt pushed anything new yet although applying a small amount of 12-10-10 w trace minerals and giving it a trace mineral foliar spray has corrected the pale color of the new leaves.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Also the satsuma in-ground w no signs of stress... just gave it that same citrus 12-10-10 slow release and it began to bloom. It has set fruit from those blossoms and is now going through another blossom phase. Maybe that can tell me what type of satsuma it is since i picked it up from a curbside with no tag. Turns out the busted sewer pipe that the neighbor's oak tree busted is a mere 2-3 feet from it. Yikes! I dont plan on moving the tree, root guard should do the job.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

And the brazos belle in its original container. Must repot soon or clear its place in the backyard


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

The brazos belle with its only fruit. It is pushing new leaves though


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Mangoes are getting ripe :-)


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Alphonso - I brought this and NamDocMai to share at TRFG meeting last week.


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

Nice to see truly local mangos from houston!! Its not fair i didnt now about TRFG!!! Do they have official meetings? Also -have you tried picking alphonsos before they break color to ripen off the tree? I read that improves taste...My alphonso is just sittin pretty in pot doing nothing but staying same size w no flushes... My cogshall flushed major green and doesnt look like a skinned chicken anymore! The mallika is still thin and slanky but had a lot of new leaves. All but one of my mango seedlings are both alive and growing and flushing new green. dont have the pics w me now though...

This post was edited by craze4mango_tx on Sat, Aug 16, 14 at 14:42


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RE: Planting Mango tree in Houston TX

TRFG has a Facebook group and we try to meet 2-3 times a year (lot of seed, bud wood and plant exchange plus grafting demos etc are done)

I can send you a message here with if you are interested (there is no membership, you just need Facebook account :-)

I just picked 4 NamDocMai mangoes this morning.


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