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Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Posted by jtrevino 8 or 9 (My Page) on
Sat, Sep 22, 07 at 1:27

Some planting zone maps have Austin in zone 8 and some in zone 9. I think the lower limit for Jacarandas are zone 9. Either way, my Jacaranda trees are going to have a tough time surviving their first central Texas winter. Below are the two Jacarandas that I planted in the spring this year. They have doubled in height to nearly 9 feet each. That's remarkable.

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Front yard Jacaranda

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Back yard Jacaranda

Has anyone grown Jacarandas or other similar zone trees successfully in Texas or other similar weather states? Can you share your winterizing techniques? I'm a new gardner and I'm eager to learn. My Jacarandas probably don't have a prayer in Austin but I'd like to do what I can to help them survive their first year. If you have any pictures of your Jacaranda trees, please post them. Thank you for the information.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

After seeing your jacaranda, I would be embarrassed to post a picture of mine. Yours looks GREAT! I bought mine last fall, and it was about 4' tall. Well it is still about 4' tall and sitting there and not growing even a little. It has been in the ground since last November. I don't protect it at all, but then I do live right on the water.

I have read on different websites that the hardiness zones are from 9 to 11, so I don't know what you need to do in zone 8. Maybe you can contact the Travis County Extension Office for advice.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

The trees that I posted earlier were about 4 ft high with no leaves when I planted them. They were not grown from seed. So don't feel bad if your jacaranda is not growing. I sounds like it survived the last Texas winter, which was a bad one around Austin.

I did, however, plant some jacaranda seeds this spring. They too have grown to various heights. The pictures below show some to near 24 inches, most others to about 14 inches, and some smaller ones to about 8 inches.

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Since they are all still in pots, I think I'll bring them into the garage when I need to this winter. If they don't do well in the garage, I'll have to winterize them outside.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

They grow downtown San Antonio, but downtown has it's own microclimate, which is zone 9.

They look like a legume?

Is it by chance decidious?

I wonder if it would have the hardiness of Pride of Barbadoos? (Considered root hardy in San Antonio. Mulched well.)

Your little ones will have to go in the garage.

I'm curious and will try to find some info about Jacaranda.

Did your's flower?


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I got three round woody pods (with seeds in them) from Los Angeles last year. There were about 75 to 100 seeds in each pod. They don't look like typical legumes but maybe they are. From there, I started experimenting with different soils and pre-formed pellets. That's why I have so many litte Js. The combination of pre-formed pellets and compost grew the best. The two Js in the picture by themselves were grown in pre-formed pellets and compost. I think Jacarandas are deciduous or at least I hope so because the leaves definitely won't make the winter. The larger 9 ft Jacaranda trees did not flower. I figure they are too young still and only been in the ground for about 6 months. I read in other posts that they may not bloom until their 4th year. I have not heard of Pride of Barbadoos but it sounds interesting. Will have to look at information on the web.

Have you seen the Jacarandas in San Antonio bloom?

If you go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Jacaranda you'll see some information about Jacarandas. Picture of pod as well.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Here are a few links about jacaranda:

http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Bignoniaceae/Jacaranda_mimosifolia.html

http://www.desert-tropicals.com/bbs/posts/8569.html

Here is a gardenweb thread:
http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/calif/msg0414020120155.html

Desert Tropicals gives the hardiness info.

Unfortunately, California uses their own hardiness zones, so none of it makes any sense to me.

The coldest place I could find them growing was Sacramento. Normally, they are in zone 9. However, I checked their weather last winter. They got down to 21.
It seems like their last winter was colder than ours.

However, the winter of 2005-06, Sacramento had about 5 days of frost, pretty much at 32 degrees and not lower.

Your's is right next to the street, which is the disadvantage. You might try putting Christmas tree lights on it. (Use the large bulbs)

Covering it up is also an option. I've used appliance boxes on large plants.

With some effort, I think you can protect this tree, unless we have an unusually cold winter.

I've over wintered "true tropicals"-(houseplants)- by throwing blankets on them, and they have survived. (They had some die back, but not much)

I got the Sacramento weather stats from underground weather. www.wunderground.com BTW: Sacramento is going to get down to 49 degrees tonight. Coastal California weather makes me sick!!! Cool summers, mild winters.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Thank you "pricklypearsatx" for posting the information about Schultze House in San Antonio having a Jacaranda tree. I will call them next week to see if I can get some pictures from them.

http://ecommons.library.cornell.edu/bitstream/1813/145/2/tree.pdf

Above is an interesting study about protecting citris trees from freezing temperatures. The study compared styrofoam and fiberglass insulation, among other things, for protecting trunks. Sounds like something impractical for citrus crops because of the size and magnitude of the crop industry. However, protecting 2 Jacaranda trees may be worth a try. Together with x-mas lights and burlap. Hmm.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I have looked at our local nurseries in San Antonio for Jacarundas to no avail. We moved here from from San Diego a year ago and they are on every street edge all over town out there. My favorites are the huge ones that are over 2 stories high and as big around as our heritage oaks here. They make an insane mess in the spring but I don't care, they are such a beautiful color purple! It never gets below freezing in San Diego proper though so I don't know if they're deciduous or not. I know there were others on this forum (or maybe the general Southwest forum?) that said they did not overwinter well in zone 8. If I could get my hands on one though I'd do my best to make it work! Maybe an enourmo pot so I could overwinter it indoors until it got good and huge. Has anyone seen one for sale out here?


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

To "ltcollins1949": The 4 ft Jacaranda tree that you planted in ground last November. Being that your in zone 9a, did the Jacaranda lose all its leaves last winter or only some leaves? Obviously, your tree survived the bad winter we had last year. Thats a great accomplisment, even if it has not grown well this year. I'm still trying to convince you to post a picture of your Jacaranda Tree. Please.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

To "michellesg": If your looking for Jacarandas trees, I don't know of any store which carries Jacarandas in the Austin area. I've heard of some places in Houston that sell Jacarandas but I'd have to review some posts to find out the names.

The other alternative is that I could give you a couple of Jacarandas that are exhibited in the picture above (Jacarandas on the green picnic bench). I would give them to you at no charge but with one condition. You, or a friend of yours, or relative of yours, would have to pick them up at my home address or we could meet at a designated spot in Austin so that I can give them to you. You can have 4 of the Jacarandas. Remember, these Jacarandas are between 10 to 20 inches in height. But if you were looking for longer Jacarandas, youll have to get them at a garden store. If you are interested, just let me know so that we can discuss the transfer plan. I don't like mailing these Jacarandas because of the potential for severe foliage damage and soil spilling from the pot.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

That's very sweet of you! I'd love a few of them and no, I don't think they'd do well in shipment either. I'm in Austin about once a month, I've already been there this month but I'll be going again next month. You can email me at MichelleSGFBRN@gmail.com
Thanks! With 4 I can figure out how best to overwinter and not get too sad if there's a casualty...


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I've only seen Jacarandas grown in large numbers in San Diego(zone 10b/11a) or LA close to the coast(10a/b). I didn't see a whole lot of them from Simi Valley(zone 10 about 30 min from LA coast) to Santa Clarita Valley,Ca(zone 9b a bit further than simi). I wonder if that's because of rare but real cold snaps(below 40) or people consider the 10 zillion purple flowers that scatter everywhere a nuisance? Maybe I got used to them and didn't notice when they were around? My DH doesn't remember them outside of San Diego or La either? PJ


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I just recently put supporting posts around the Jacarandas in the ground (posted photos above). Their growing so fast and getting so top heavy that they started leaning a little. I hope these trees are completely deciduous in Austin's winter climate because the chances of survival will be better, I think, if all the leaves are gone. Any other ideas on how to over winter tropical trees?

This is what the Jacaranda seedlings looked like after about 2-3 weeks. These are the ones on the picnic table photo above.

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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Jacarandas will survive some winters in Austin, being that they will tolerate low 20's in winter with defoliation. However, what will do them in, or at least burn them back is the occasional ice storms we get. I've had jacarandas, and other similarly hardy trees (Peltophorum dubium, Melaleuca alternifolia, Lagunaria patersonii, Callistemon citrinus, etc.) take low 20's quite well, but when the ice shows up, the bark splits on many of them and death or dieback ensues.

They do well in central Florida, and would undoubtedly do OK in Galveston and in south Texas. I've seen a few in Austin, but no big ones...


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

To seagrapes: Did the Jacarandas you had in Austin lose most of their leaves before or after the first freeze? Did you try to protect them from the freezes or were they on their own? You mentioned seeing a few small ones in Austin. Do you know the approximate location or address of the Jacarandas? I'd like to go see them someday.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Most of the ones still had leaves on them, but tend to shed after a hard freeze. Many jacarandas naturally go deciduous for a short period in late winter anyway, right around bloom time. I didn't really protect the ones I had because I wanted to see how tough they were, with good results until the ice storm. This was a few years ago; I don't currently have any Jacarandas. The ones I've seen around town were over the past ten years or so. I don't know of many these days. I do have a friend in south Austin near Slaughter/Manchaca that has one in his front yard. Last I saw it (a few months ago) it was about the size of yours.

I did try to grow a different species (Jacaranda cuspidifolia) last year, but the seeds didn't germinate. It's supposed to be SLIGHTLY hardier than the usual Jacaranda mimosifolia.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Thank you seagrapes, I could not find the Jacaranda on Menchaca and Slaughter, but I appreciate the tip.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

The south Austin tree is NEAR Slaughter/Manchaca on Cattle Trl., which comes off Texas Oaks (east of Manchaca on Slaughter). It is in a shady spot in a yard w/ many palms and cacti.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

No luck again, seagrapes. I think I'll stop looking for this Jacaranda on Cattle Trl. People are staring at me when I'm driving slow through their neighborhood. I don't blame them. That area looks like good microhabitat for Jacaranda. Other very large shade trees, small hills and valleys, lush area. I think I'll visit the Schultze Garden in San Antonio to see their 25 ft plus Jacaranda.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

My jacaranda survived the winter here in Lost Creek. I bought in through the mail from Zone 9 Tropicals in Houston last spring. It arrived in beautiful condition and was about 40 inches tall. It is now over six feet. It did not lose its leaves but some of the tips are brown. How are yours doing?


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Thanks for the good information everyone. I just happen to have a Jacaranda sitting in a pot waiting to be planted. I'm in San Antonio and from I gather, looks like I'll need to find a fairly sheltered location that still gets sun.

In addition, and now I'm geussing, I'll probably need a couple warm winters, like this one, for the tree to really establish itself.

In other words, I'll need some luck.

Maybe I could plant it in a big pot this year, until it's more established and then put it in the ground next year or the year after...

I'd certainly like to have a tree like that. I grew up in Miami, home to some of the most beautiful royal poincianas I've ever seen.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Nightrider, if you got those Jacs from Patty they are one of those in jtrevinos posts. I got them from him and gave 4 or so to Patty so she could overwinter them in her green house. I kept 4 big ones and they did fine outside but I brought them in for the freezes. We had such a mild winter though so we were lucky. I don't think they'll be big enough to over winer out side here for another year or two. I plan on putting mine in big pots with wheels. Let us know how they do over the years. It'll be interesting to see which ones fare best and in what locations.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I have decided to put mine in a large pot for a season or two and over-winter it in the garage,,, if it will fit.

It's such a nice tree...

But back to potting. I wonder, I would assume the tree would prefer a slightly acidic soil. What would be a good additive to the potted soil, peat?

Take care.

Mike


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

This jacaranda stands in front of a six foot stone wall with southern exposure. It has been in the ground since May 2007 and survived the winter with some protection. I purchased it via mail from Zone 9 Tropicals in Houston. It was about 40 inches tall and in excellent condition when it arrived. I am hoping the wall will work as a heat sink. My caladiums in this location have survided two winters.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Mine are still in pots but they have survived the past winter outside. I want to plant them in ground this fall in a semi protected area but they are small enough that I can still cover them easily if need be.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

This story is long overdue. The jacarandas that I planted in the ground in March 2007 survived the first winter and are still thriving (see new pictures). However, they experienced heavy freeze damage on the tips and thats probably why they did not flower. Or maybe they did not flower because theyre still too young. I tried my best to protect them but in the end they were just to big to completely cover. I used a combination of burlap tree wrap, frost blankets, and x-mas lights underneath. I looked like a fool out there trying to cover and insulate the trees. Some neighbors even asked me if I was celebrating some weird kind of x-mas with the two white-lighted, 10-ft tall x-mas towers. I pruned the jacarandas in the spring and everywhere I pruned, two new branches grew, so the trees doubled in branches and the trees got thicker. One thing is for sure. I will not be making the same effort to protect them this coming winter. I know now what parts of the jacaranda can be saved in the winter and what parts will freeze no matter what. If I ever want them to flower in this area, I think the key will be to grow them as thick as possible. My experience so far is that they need to be pruned to leave about 2 ft of new branch each year or else they will grow very tall, and skinny, and fall over with the heavy foliage and snap with heavy wind gusts.

Front Yard Jacaranda
Front Yard Jacaranda

Back Yard Jacaranda
Back Yard Jacaranda

The small jacarandas that I planted from seed in April 2007 survived as well. I brought them inside whenever frost or freezes were predicted. All but three 4-ft trees were given away to friends or sold. Im not sure what I will do to the last three jacarandas. I had fun growing these trees from seed. I learned a lot of information by trial and error. Now I hope to keep the jacarandas alive in central Texas and figure out a way to make them flower blue.

4-ft Jacarandas
4-ft Jacaranda


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Looks like your Jacaranda had a good year. Seems like the trunks got a bit thicker. Hopefully that will help them make it through the winter.

My tree has been in the ground all season and is about 4 ft tall. It's not very tall, but it is fairly happy with plenty of growth.

I think I'll cut it back to just the trunk this winter and find a can to cover it with.

My thoery on these guys is that they need a little luck to make it past the first couple of winters, till they become established.

Hopefully this winter will be fairly mild...

I really have to wonder though,,, if they might be like the Pride of Barbados plants we have here in San Antonio. They die to the ground in the winter and come back every year. Very similar looking plant.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

My guess is they die back too. I have no clue how they flower but your determination to grow them is inspiring!!! PJ


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

The Jacaranda does look alot like Pride of Barbados plants. The literature on the Jacaranda says that when they flower, they do so in terminal buds in the spring. I think that means at the end of the branch. But the ends of the branches will freeze in the winter. To give some perspective on how thick the trunks have gotten since the spring of 2007, I'm posting some pictures of the same Jacarandas when they were younger.

Young Front Jacaranda

Jacaranda tree planted in the front yard

Young Back Jacaranda

Jacaranda tree planted in the back yard


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Wow, I'm so glad I found this post. I am in The Woodlands TX. (north of Houston) I bought two 3-4 ft $10.00 trees from Lowes two years ago. They are now beautiful 25+ ft trees. I have had to trim them periodically due to them growing so fast - but I have only trimmed away the branches they have sent sideways. (I don't know how to prune them)

Ike came through and took a huge pine and an oak from my yard, but these troopers survived....though they were nearly uprooted.

I would like to find out how to prune them back, as I now have them tied to the fence. I'm afraid of losing them if they become too top heavy.

Also, I would love to hear from anyone in the Houston area that has blooming jacaranda. Mine have not bloomed yet, I am thrilled at the prospect of seeing these babies blooming within a year or two.

full tree


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Man, your jacaranda trees look beautiful. My trees are a half year younger and not quite as tall, one about 16 feet, the other about 12 feet. Last year, they got to 12 feet and 10 feet. I trimmed them in the spring to about 2 feet on each branch. I trimmed them because they sustained severe frost/freeze damage on the tips over the winter. I also trimmed them because they were growing too fast and too thin, making them very vulnerable to high wind gusts. The picture below shows the 16 foot tree which I trimmed. If you look at the middle branch where it Ys into two smaller branches, the second photo is a closeup of that Y. The middle stub where I pruned will eventually fall off. The cuts seem pretty sturdy. I think next year I will prune at anywhere between 2 foot to 4 foot on each new branch. I'm not an experienced pruner but so far I have not made any serious errors. Towards the end of the growing season, I stake the trees straight because they start leaning a bit. Compared to last year, the trees leaned a little bit less because the trunks are getting thicker. But I still staked them because they are prone to breaking/snapping with high gust winds.

Jacaranda in Back Yard

16 foot Jacaranda in Back Yard

Jacaranda Branch

Closeup of Prune cut on Jacaranda


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Hi jtrevino--

I've been wanting to try a jacaranda here in Elgin (~20 mi E of Austin), so I was delighted to stumble upon this thread. I've never used Christmas lights for cold protection--I'm going to have to give that a try. And maybe buy some cheap, second-hand blankets from a thrift shop.

I was wondering if you have any baby Js left, and if you would be willing to sell/trade for them. I'd love to avoid the drive to Houston/San A. I've got some ~6-month old Crinum macowanii seedlings, if you're interested.

Cheers


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Person in Elgin, I am sorry but I have two 5-foot Js left in pots from the seeds I grew in April 2007. My wife wants to plant them in our yard in the spring. But if you can wait, I plan to grow between 20 and 30 from seed next March. I already know what kind of soil makes them grow the fastest. After 3 months (by June), they will be between 12 and 18 inches tall. I will give you a few at that point. If you want to grow them by seed now, I can send you some seeds. If you get some older Js, I would recommend that you not plant them in the ground until early April after the last freeze.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

How well would one do in a pot all the time, keeping it pruned to a reasonable size?


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

For the 2 Js that I've had for about 17 months since seed, they have down pretty well. However, I've noticed that the main tap root is extremely long and starts curling up at the bottom. If the pot is not changed, it will outgrow it. But if you prune enough when it is larger, it may be ok. It needs a place with good sun. Dark areas would kill it. It also needs good drainage. Standing water will cause rootrot. Near or in DFW, it would need to be protected during winter freezing, brought in the garage or house.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

So how long does it take for the J's to bloom? I have some for a few yrs, and they have not flowered yet, however when you walk by them during spring and even now they smell nice(sweet) but they have not bloomed yet. Mine were planted from seed like about 5 or 6 yrs back.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

FYI - Zone9Tropicals Houston has jacaranda on clearance right now.

I ordered one last week.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Hi jtrevio,

What's your secret on germinating jacaranda seeds?
Based on the picture of the seedlings, it looks like you use grapeseed compost. Am I right? If so, do you ammend it with something else?
It would be great if you shared your detailed recipe.
I bet that many readers would appreciate your contribution to the forum.
I read that is recommended to prune branches that become thicker than half the diameter of the main trunk to maintain in great shape. Perhaps they can get top heavy.
Also, I remember when I lived in tropical Mexico, the trees would drop the spent flowers that looked like beautiful purple snow on sidewalks which became extremely slippery. I remember once taking a sliding ride landing flat on the ground and ended up covered with purple ink from the flower debris :-)


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

My experiments were by trial and error. In the end, the Jacaranda seeds I planted didn't seem to be too picky in the type of medium being used. In my experiments, I used either peat moss pellets, general compost, general potting soil, general tree/shrub soil, or a combination of. All my trials germinated, but some germinated faster and sturdier. Here is my rank: 1.peat moss pellets, 2. compost, 3. general tree/shrub soil, and 4. potting soil. In general, the best type of medium was the one which was lightest/loosest, less compacted, better for sunlight penetration it seemed, and easy draining. Germinating was easiest, fastest, and sturdiest with peat most pellets supplemented with compost. The peat moss pellet trials were the first to germinate and the medium made the root structure branch out faster and thus sturdier. All trials germinated between 10 and 21 days. The potting soil trials were the slowest and hardest to grow but they all still germinated. Potting soil is more compact and slower to drain. For the first month or so, the ambient temperature should be between 70 and 85 Fahr., and the trials need to be in mostly shady area with partial sunlight. Watering should be done when the soil becomes somewhat dry, roughly every 2-3 days.

On pruning, half the diameter of the main trunk is what I've heard as well. My trees have been in ground for only one and a half years and I have only pruned once, this past spring. They do get top heavy. My trees will be staked up, at least during the end of the growing season, and probably for about 3 years until the main trunk gets thick enough. The staking has also prevented tree snapping on many high wind gust occasions. So far, the trees have not bloomed. I hope they do someday.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I think I ended up with one of your trees jtrevino. I put mine in the ground early this year here in San Antonio. Can't say it had a huge growth rate. The tree is about 4 feet tall. But that being said,,, it's nice and healthy, really bushy. Everything fried in my yard this summer, only a coupla canna flowered. So overall, the tree did fairly well.

But the main stem in only half bark colored and half tender green. I don't think she's gonna make it this winter so I'm gonna dig her up and bring her in before it gets too cold....

I'll replant her in the front yard for morning sun and afternoon shade come spring.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Hello, last time I posted pictures was around the Aug-Oct. 2008 timeframe. Now in March 2009, getting close to the end of winter, I wanted to post my first winter pictures of my jacaranda trees. Although I did not cover the in-ground jacaranda this winter (just partially with burlap around the trunks), they have weathered this year's mild winter pretty well. They lost all their leaves. Its a good sign that most of the tips at the top are now sprouting again. Its almost time to prune these babies. Last year I left around 2 ft of new branch. This year I'll probably leave around 4 ft of new branch. And remember, every where I prune, two new branches will come out and the trunk will get thicker for support. The front tree will have 8 branches and the backyard tree will have 10 branches. I have 3 potted jacaranda left (one was brought back) and I think the tallest two will be ready for the ground this spring. The potted trees were brought into the garage when needed. The first picture is the front yard tree, the second is the back yard tree, the third is a closeup of the burlap wrap around the back yard tree, the fourth is a closeup of some branch tips of the front yard tree, and the fifth shows three potted trees.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

3/1/09- Yesterday's news informed me that we could expect an overnight freeze. My yard in Lost Creek runs about four degrees cooler than the temps predicted and recorded at the Camp Mabry weather station. My jacaranda lost all its leaves in the last frost, but it is budding out at the tops of its three trunks. What was I to do? I placed a 20 ounce plastic cup on the upper end of each branchless trunk and pulled a kitchen garbage bag over that and used the built-in ties to seal the bag about two feet below the top. I thought about stuffing the bag with straw or newspaper but the gusty wind made that an iffy proposition. The increased wind resistance might crack off an entire trunk and I didn't want to lose anything from the ten or more feet the tree has attained after two years in the ground. I opened one of the bags this afternoon and found the buds undamaged. I will leave the bags on for tonight because it is supposed to get even colder this time around. To summarize: My jacaranda has survived two Austin winters and is now about eleven feet tall. It was three feet tall when planted outside. It has no leaves or branches at this point, but the buds show that it the trunk is healthy all the way to the top.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Yep, those buds are pretty tender. They took a hit in last night's freeze. And we'll probably have a few more freezes before the end of March. I'm not too worried about losing the buds or even the top 2-4 ft since I'll be pruning them anyway. If you take a look at the back yard jacaranda picture, those 5 branches are new since my last pruning of that tree. That's 8-10 ft of new growth last year. The problem with my jacarandas is that only the top pair of buds, or top 2 pairs, grow well to form sturdy branches. If I allow that type of growth per year, these trees would bend and basically lay down and snap with the 1st 20-30 mile wind gust. I am slowly but surely thickening the trunk for support when I prune this way. I hope your J's in Lost Creek did ok last night.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

How can I get a tree to winter over in NE Oklahoma? I saw one in SE Kansas that I know was an older Jacaranda tree. It was already established on some property and current owners had no clue of the tree or it's origins. I planted a 2 ft. tree, only to have our winter here take it's toll on it. We've had some unusually cold winters and ice the last 2-3 years. I want one SO bad, and have 4 seedlings now I am tending to. We have thorny locust here (same genus) that grow as a nuisance tree (except that it makes GREAT firewood with high BTU ratings) and wonder why they can survive these temps but the Jacaranda didn't? It grew to over 6 ft. it's first year and I was so happy, but.....alas, winter came calling for it. Didn't make sense to dig up a 6 ft. tree that seemed to be doing do well to bring inside for the winter (and I didn't have the space for it).


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Wow it was 6ft and didn't survive your winter? Now I remember why I live in the sun belt! Obviously you are trying to get a plant to survive in a climate that it just was not built to handle. Do you have any other places to plant it that are more protected? 6 ft would seem to me as though it was grown enough to survive but if it can't at that point then you're going to have to give it a special spot somewhere.
I know they are pretty hardy trees, I have 2 that jtrevino was nice enough to give me a yer ago. They are both in medium size pots needing desperately to be planted. They survived last winter just fine with no protection at all and are now almost 3 ft. My winters aren't as harsh as yours but they aren't really supposed to survive freezes at this size yet they did with out any leaf loss.
Maybe in a walled in patio area around your home? I know that's not ideal but it may survive better there. Can't very well cover a 6ft tree...


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

So, how are the Jacarandas doing? Any survive this past very cold winter?


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Ahhh, the Jacaranda thread!

My tree got hit pretty hard. I was out of town when the freeze came, so it got no protection. Now the upper limbs are dark and seem lifeless. But half way down the trunk, I still see some color.

I'm inclined to think that when it really starts getting warm, the tree will shoot some new branches out.

I hope it does. I really believe that once established, this pretty tree will do ok here. It is very heat tolerant and will continue to grow while the other plants stop due to heat. Plus it has very pretty grren leaves.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I had about a 12 ft tree in the middle of the back yard, I bought it about 2 years ago at the Master Gardeners Plant sale in Rockport. It was unprotected and it got down to 26 degrees for about 5 or 6 hours, I did not think it would come back. I cut it back to where I could still see life, about 10 inches. This past weekend, I noticed that there were all kinds of shoots coming out the sides. Same thing with the Hong Kong Orchid tree. All,I need to figure out is how to support those little branches until they can stand on their own. They are both in Rockport. Barbra


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I bought a neglected tree in a 5 gallon pot at a nursery in LA in '05. It looked to be about 3 to 5 years old already, and in full foliage. I sweated the return to Texas through checkpoints...it looked pretty bogus across the back seat of an '03 Cobra convertible.
First it went into a 40 gallon hole chipped into limestone out near Dripping Springs, right on a hill top. It seemed OK and got about 6 feet tall until temperatures in the teens killed it right back to the rootball. It re-emerged in Spring of '06 and I put it in a 40 gallon Vietnamese pot. Moved it around and keep it inside during the Austin Winters. It did well in a pot.
Finally moved to the NASA area down on the bay in Houston. Put it in the ground and it grew from pot size to 20 feet from May to present (11/10) in one season. Lots of plant food and water...looking to see how it will take the Winter, and I'm very impressed with this little trees' tenacity.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I bought a baby J from a nursery this past spring and planted it in the yard (I live in Houston). It was about 4' tall. It is now around 12', and still has healthy green fronds, but continues to be a main trunk with 2 branches growing vertically. From reading the posts, it sounds like I need to prune the two branches back to 2-4' in order for it to branch out.... and look like a "real" tree. Is this correct? Do I do this pruning in spring after freeze danger is over?


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Jacaranda tree

I spent past hour reading through all posts. I live in Austin and VERY interested in this tree. I can't find any place selling them. Would someone tell me if Jacaranda will survive here in Austin? and if you know of where sell them?
Thanks, E.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I've been trying to grow a "J" here in New Orleans for the longest time.. i have many 1 inch tall tress and one 4 inch tree thats about a year and a half old. Now i think i know the problem from reading these posts, i've been using potting soil. tomorrow i'm going to go out and pick up some peat moss pellet and compost, and general tree/shurb soil.. I am doing a tiny bit better with a few Royal Poinciana trees. but i'm also thinking maybe it's where i'm getting my seeds, could it be bad seeds?


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

They dont care about amended or acid soil. They make thier own nitrogen (a legume) they don't tolerate cold well.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I think I lost my jacaranda tree. I had 8 royal poinciana trees in 1 gallon pots, they were doing great, I covered them with a towel so they would not freeze, but they all froze. I guess they cannot take any cold. I am glad to know now, before I planted them in the yard. I have enough large frozen trees to dig up. I got mine in Key West Florida, they were in the cracks where the curb and the street meet. I put them in a cup, with dirt, they all made it. I am glad I waited before I planted them in the yard. I never expected them to freeze. I cut the jacaranda tree down to the ground, but still no signs of life. Barbra


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

barbara, they might have survived in the ground. I'd go for it in Houston and even true zone 8b in a protected spot. Plants roots, even with a towel, are very prone to freeze damage in a pot. A pot is up to 2 zones colder than in the ground. If you were to mulch them and throw a sheet over while small, I'll bet they make it. I know for a fact you can grow them in zone 9 in CA.(Jacarandas too)

Will jacarandas bloom in a container? There's no way they'd survive the last two winters here in Fort Worth without being taken in.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

If anyone in the San Antonio area hasn't given up on the idea of trying to grow jacarandas here after the last two unusually brutal winters, I saw that Rainbow Gardens nursery (the Thousand Oaks Dr. location) had about 10 small ones for sale when I visited two days ago.

I bought my jacarandas on ebay and at Milberger's nursery a couple of years ago, and of my original three, two have survived the last two winters, with careful protection. The two that lived were frosted way back. One, at the edge of live oak canopy, was burned back to hard wood, and the other, out in the open and weakened by trunk damage from deer antlers, was killed to within a couple of inches from the ground. They are now about 5 or 6 ft. tall. The one that died had previously come back from the roots after a 12 degree F absolute low in the winter of 2009/10 but was finally killed after a 15 degree F low in the winter of 2010/11, which was accompanied by frost and even overnight snow(!) I'll sure be glad when we get back to our normal mild zone 9 winters, I think the jacarandas will really take off.

A month ago I was downtown and decided to swing by the Schultze House to try to find the much-vaunted jacaranda there, which one website said was at least 25 ft. tall. What I found left me greatly underwhelmed. The little specimen that I saw out behind the Schutlze House may have been a replacement sapling or perhaps a larger tree was killed by the winter cold and was coming back from the roots?

Anyway, to honebunny2, I would try those royal poincianas (and jacarandas) in the ground at the edge of evergreen canopy, like live oak. My royal poinciana planted with such overhead protection has come back vigorously from the mulched roots even after the above unusually low winter temperatures. If you have zone 9 winters and Texas spring/summer heat, they will bounce back quickly, even if damaged by occasional freezes.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Hello,

I bought a Jacaranda and am having it planted next to the street. I was hoping for an update on the Jacaranda planted in the zone 8. I've read the posts but since my jacaranda will be next to the street I don't believe I can put christmas lights on it to help it get through the winter, although the burlap wrap seems like an option. Did your tree's survive?


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Mustangboy, zone 8 is too cold there or here. I've lived in both places in that zone. San Antonio is like the San Fernando Valley in stuff you can grow. If you're zone 8 up north I can't tell you but I'm thinking it would be too cool for flowers anyway.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I lost both the jacaranda, and the royal ponicana trees in this last freeze. I have given up on them! I also lost palm trees I have had since 1996. The only plant that really survived the freeze were the tropical hibiscus. I had all my plants covered, they still froze. I have learned my lesson, and will not try again! I have planted my new plumeria, brugmansia, and iochroma in pots, so I can move themn inside in the winter. No freezes for the past 15 years, and then two in a role, I cannot afford to take the chance. Barbra


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

That sucks honeybunny. I thought zone 9 would work too. I'm sorry you lost your trees.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I just bought a house in zone 9a, and we've had several frosts up here in Ramona,CA (NE of San Diego in SD County). I have 3 Jacaranda trees in the front yard, on the NE side of house with no protection, on the street edge of front yard. I can see some dark discoloration on upper branches, am wondering how bad the damage is. I found this thread while investigating the trees and frost damage. I'm sad to think they might not make it, but happy to read that some have pulled through frosts ok. We're due for another frost tonight.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I moved here from CA. My DH is from that area. Zone 9 in CA is much different than zone 9 TX. Your trees will be OK.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Jacarandas are deciduous. They flower in the Spring (March/April in Santa Barbara, CA - Zone 10/Sunset 24), flowers come first, then they leaf out.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I don't know know if anyone knows where I can get some here in Austin, but I want them badly. I used to drive down a street on my way to work everyday when I lived in CA that was always so beautiful in the spring.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I got some tiny seedlings on April 5th. I put one in the ground on July 3rd and it is now 7 foot tall.

I have a 20x40 tarp and I am erecting a pop-up tent that I can use to cover the tree this Winter. I will put a tiny heater inside. I will also fill the space with 80 small Jacaranda and put my Tribble Serama in there when temps drop into the 30's.

Here is a link that might be useful: Jacaranda progress from seedling to 7 footer


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Your pictures are fascinating. That's a fast growing tree alright, and gracefully beautiful already.

I think this must be the longest running thread on the Texas forum. Lots of people love Jacaranda trees and I can see why.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Having lived in SD until 4 years ago(now in Austin)I remember many of the Jacs up and down boulevards, especially toward the downtown area. I Used to take a particular street when going to the airport and the Jacs were in a center island. Although they are quite messy, I see that as quite forgiving in relationship to the beauty they provide.

Welcomsite, a seven footer in only 6 months~~amazing!!! You must have quite the green 'hand'. LOL


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Thanks pattcakes & roselee.
The tree is actually 8 months old, assuming the seedling was no older than 6 weeks when it arrived?

I looked at my 5 day forecast this morning & it showed 37 degrees for Monday night! Scared me into building the swing arms for my pop-up Arctic Survival Tube. It will be 8' x 22'. I'll post pics of this thing when it's all done.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Welcome, I'm looking forward to seeing the pictures.

Patty cakes, when I saw SD I thought 'South Dakota' ... uh uh, no way. Of course -- SD also stands for San Diego :-)


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

I already had the timbers, tarp, pvc fittings and the bamboo, along with 1" pvc for the uprights. All I needed to go buy was 1/2" pvc and glue.

Inside tube

Outside tube

In addition to the tiny heater, the 17 small chickens will also be adding their body heat to the enclosure.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Well things looked good back in October. I managed to break the tip off the tree a number of times but the tree and 50 more Jacaranda in bags all made it through November, December, January & February just fine. By March 28th, I never suspected the surprise freeze that stripped all growth from everything.

By April, things were resprouting though. The main tree only sprouted from the base of the trunk. I chose 1 sprout, 5 inches from the ground & pruned the rest. This 2nd year tree is now almost 9 foot tall & growing.

Look how quickly the wound is healing.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

hey there, i know this is an old post, so i was curious as to how your jacarandas are holding up? i am carefully considering the pros and cons of which trees i want to put on my new property, and this is pretty much at the top of the list next to mexican plum trees... both of which prefer a hotter zone than the one we're in here in austin.


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RE: Winterizing Jacaranda Trees

Me, too. Me, too. Count me along with all the others that want to see how your tree grows. I'm in Temple, an hour north of Austin. What do you think my chances are for growing one?

Yours are absolutely beautiful and I loved seeing your propagation, too

Xtal


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