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Let me tell you a story

Posted by plantmaven 8b/9a TX (My Page) on
Wed, Sep 21, 11 at 9:11

When I was about 5 years old I spent a lot of time with a neighbor couple. They had no children. They had a yard with many plants. This yard was my first memory of clock vine and dutchman's pipe vine.
When he planted any thing he used the method of filling the hole full of water. He then set the plant in the hole and filled it again. Then he used a hoe to backfill the soil while the water was till in the hole. He gently stepped on the soil to get any air pockets out.

Monday I did this with a 3 gallon potted beauty berry. It took me several hours to get the hole dug. The soil was like concrete and had numerous rocks in it.
As of yet the plant has not even wilted.

This was a bird planted beauty berry that I dug up and potted in the spring.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Let me tell you a story

about a man named Brady!

Oh sorry got confused (Brady Bunch theme song)

I heard it called the "mud method" with roses. You water the heck outta the original plant,making it muddy, plop it on a tarp,mud and all, (or if it's small a bucket will do) drag it across the yard to another hole filled with water/mud ,plop the plant in and cover. I do mine differently. I water the plant the day before so it's moist not wet, drag it on a tarp (no pruning), plop it in a pre-dug,composted hole that's very wet and cover it over.


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RE: Let me tell you a story

Beverlyhillbillies too


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RE: Let me tell you a story

That's the way a man, who was originally from Mexico, planted some large trees when we moved in here. He said it was to make sure that there were no air pockets around the roots which would cause them to die. Since learning the method from him I do it when large items are planted.

Thanks for reminding us all. It might save some heart ache over loosing some newly planted trees and shrubs.

BTW, I've had the same experience digging holes in ground like you describe :-(


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RE: Let me tell you a story

I had one hole so bad I made my DH do it. He was really sweet and didn't mind, but I HATE having to ask for help with stuff like this.


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RE: Let me tell you a story

It just kills me that it takes me hours to do what once took 40 minutes.


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RE: Let me tell you a story

I hear that!


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RE: Let me tell you a story

We're not as young as we once were. I just pace myself especially when its 108.


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I hear you too, so much slower than a few years ago, but hopefully a little wiser!

Am fixing to plant in my new flowerbed, the last 20 yards of soil should be in by the first of next week. Will use that method, it seems like a great idea. All my potted plants look horrible, really took a beating this summer, including the beauty berry.


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RE: Let me tell you a story

My soil is sugar sand so it's easy to dig in, but that's the only thing easy about it. No organic matter, water flows through it, nutrients too. I worked on it for the five years before I moved here and it's barely made a difference.

I'd take the nutrient-rich clay of Euless any day - after all you plant once (or 2 or 3 times to find the right spot), but water and fertilize all the time.

- I guess it's like women and hair - we're never happy with what we have.

Lin


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RE: Let me tell you a story

yes, I would be happy to trade my fine hair for someone's thick hair.

Some friends came, today, and dug up a very large plant I did not want. So kind of him to leave me a beautiful hole to plant something else.


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RE: Let me tell you a story...... about

I don't mind the clay it is all the rocks. I am in NW San Antonio, which is the beginning of the hill country. Lots of lime stone.

We do have some pretty cool honeycomb limestone.

Photobucket

Photobucket


k


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RE: Let me tell you a story

That is so cool looking!


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It's true about how those air pockets around the roots mess with your plants. Most of the plants I lost this summer was due to moles tunneling and leaving that air space. A full time job to keep them tromped down. Sand and loam are easy to dig, but all that subterranian activity sucks. All that tromping makes the bed unlevel and sometimes pushes fresh mulch down around the roots, causing chlorisis.
I believe I would trade my sand for clay.


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RE: Let me tell you a story

Whew plantmaven! I thought you were going to say that was someone's osteoporosis hip joint! lol


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They do look like bones. hahaha


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We specifically collect the ones that look like bones and use them around the yard.


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RE: Let me tell you a story

  • Posted by ocgf Z8 (My Page) on
    Sat, Sep 24, 11 at 22:17

lol!, marti8a!!

Omar


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