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Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

Posted by roselee z8 SW Texas (My Page) on
Fri, Oct 26, 12 at 16:53

First of all I want to say how much I appreciate it! It's beautiful and I love it!

Then I want to ask if you know its name, and how hardy it is. I assume it's hardy since several large pieces were generously cut and brought to be passed around. Also how tall will it get and has it bloomed for you?

I'm thinking maybe it was brought by Rebecca and her hubby.

Shirley recently posted about a columnar cactus growing in her neighborhood.

Here is a link that might be useful: Rock-Oak-Deer: Around the Block: Cactus Blooms


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

Its either a Cereus peruvianus or Cereus jamacaru.


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

Thanks Joey! I'll check out those varieties.


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

It looks so good in your garden and should be a great start for your new look.

Joey, is the cereus different from San Pedro cactus which some of my readers are calling it?


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

Me! I have no idea which on it is. This came from the house around the corner that was vacation property, for 3 months the broken limbs laid there, I couldn`t stand it. Loaded the truck full, potted them up and they have been growing like crazy. They finally sold the house and the new owners ripped out all the cactus! AARRGGHH!

Anyway, 10-15` on average, blooms frequently, big huge white flowers that open at night. In the morning they will have hundreds of bees on them. They will be closed by the time the sun is fully up. Very fragrant. I have seen the big one on the corner where I planted it with over 200 blooms at once.

Hardiness I am little help with. It survived Ike but looked a bit, uh, limp. It sent off tons of new growth from these limp remains. It survived all of our freezing weather, even though I lost a 30`rubber tree and a 25yo plumeria it was not phased and even bloomed. My brothers broke and part of it fell in his pond where it grew for years until Ike hit, it bloomed and grew like crazy floating in the pond, very weird. I keep them on the dry side when rooting or they will sometimes rot on you.
Rebecca left her box of cactus and Mara took them for her.
Tally HO!


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

Shirley the San Pedro cactus is Trichocereus pachanoi where as Cereus peruvianus is Peruvian apple cactus. They both however produce flowers in excess of 8 inch diameter so they're both very desirable cacti.


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

Tally, I broke out laughing when I read it bloomed while floating in the pond. Now that IS weird.

Thanks so much for bringing the cuttings to the swap. Mine was well callused and I planted it in well draining gritty soil and did not water. Then of course it had to rain three inches. But I have high hopes for it. If it gets that big I wonder if I should plant it in the ground after it roots in well? Or maybe a bigger pot where it won't get so big/ We gardeners have so many difficult decisions to make ... hahaha!

Joey, thanks for the names. Maybe I'll see you at the SABG plant sale in the morning. It's going to be cool in more ways than one.


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

I just happened to think of when my neighbor Georgianne rooted some half dead yucca plants (Spanish dagger looking things) that someone had thrown out beside the road. She was rooting them in water like she does a lot of things. I said, "Georgianne, I don't think that's the best way to root yuccas." She pulled them up out of the bucket and they all had a bunch of roots. They are still growing in her yard. Oh well ... :-)


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

that cactus of my brothers was huge, over 5' tall and the bucket it floated in was full of roots. He had another one in his yard but Ike did them both in. He has an amaryllis that he has had for years and years, even before Ike, growing in that cheap plastic pot with that coir stuff. I'll go over and the thing will be full of water and yet it blooms and has a bunch of offsets. I keep trying to rescue it. So very strange. I rot anything I stick in water.

Growing it in a pot won't help, you can whack it off when it gets too big and root the top.
Tally HO!


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

Thank you Joey for the info.

I wrote a response yesterday but must not have posted it.


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

Okay Tally -- I'll do that.

I love your stories about the strange life of plants. It's amazing how often they defy the rules we make for them :-)


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

In thinking about columnar cactus I decided to check out my photos of Marty's Cactus Garden which were taken on the garden tour sponsored by the San Antonio Herb Club.

At the time I didn't appreciate how many different kinds he had there, and this probably isn't a drop in the bucket compared to how many grow in the world. Just like palms or bamboos you don't realize how many different varieties there are until you begin to study them.

How many kinds can you count in this photo? The sago palm makes a nice back drop. I may try that idea in arranging the planting of mine ...

How about the fuzz on the one in the center, and the knobby one to the right? I think the knobby characteristic is called 'monstrosus'.

And still more? Although some may be repeats of ones planted elsewhere ...

Well, I have three little ones of different varieties -- thanks to the generosity of my plant swap friends :-)


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

I guess if it gets to large to bring in on a bad freeze, one can chop the top off and start all over. Did you ask this guy what he does during a freeze?


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RE: Who brought this columnar cactus to the SA Swap?

How would I know before hand if it was going to freeze? Chop it's head off no matter what? O K A Y ... :-/ Good thing cactus are pretty forgiving ... LOL

I did ask Marty about a bunch of his plants, mostly agaves. He digs some up to go in the green house and he covers a few other borderline varieties if a hard freeze if predicted. Since some of his columnar cactus are growing in his greenhouse (first photo) that pretty much answers that and those in pots he could wheel in. I guess the real tall ones are taking it.

The two I had before the last swap took the hard freeze of 2010/11 covered with a quilt. Some stuff I covered died anyway like the barrel cactus I'd had for years.


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