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What kind of bush is this

Posted by eric_92037 CA (My Page) on
Fri, Dec 16, 11 at 14:07

Can someone tell me what kind of bush this is? Its a native of south Texas. If youre not sure please give me your best guess thanks

Here is a link that might be useful: Testing Upload One


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: What kind of bush is this

That looks like a Nandina domestica to me, which is native to East Asia but widely cultivated in Texas.

Ty


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RE: What kind of bush is this

Where are you growing it? Nandina gets insane amounts of whitefly in and around LA (except the driest desert part). My MIL grew it in Simi Valley until there was more whitefly then shrub (it looked like snow!) Fed up she 86ed it.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

I just assumed it was a Texas native because it lives in front of my Texas home. If it has white flys they must be too small for the naked eye because Ive never seen any on these bushes.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

It is an invasive in the parks of Austin. many people frown on planting it for those reasons.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

  • Posted by ocgf Z8 (My Page) on
    Sat, Dec 17, 11 at 14:26

I like it, though. It's evergreen in zone 8A, it's drought tolerant, its showy berries look good when most of everything else looks bad and the birds feed of them.

Omar


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RE: What kind of bush is this

I like it too. Looks like nandina to me also.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

This kind of nandina hasn't ever had an issue with being invasive in my yards.

Its just there and looks after itself.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

  • Posted by ocgf Z8 (My Page) on
    Sat, Dec 17, 11 at 16:17

I think it's matter of having it in the right spot under certain conditions. Like melvalena, I've had it for years and I haven't had not even one volunteer. However, my soil is almost pure caliche, I barely have shade,I don't have an irrigation system and I'm stingy when I water, so I don't think I'm providing the conditions for the plant to become invasive. Maybe if I had shade, rich soil and abundant water it would become an invasive...

Omar


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RE: What kind of bush is this

Omar,
Mine have been in shade or part shade, rich soil and abundant water. For years and years at 2 different locations. No problems.

One location was low and ranged from dry to sopping wet depending on weather. Other location is damp and well draining. Still no issues.

I honestly don't know what conditions would cause this plant to be invasive.

Perhaps its full sun and lots of water?


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RE: What kind of bush is this

Not invasive at my house either and the conditions are similar to Mel's.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

I've had a few pop up from seeds dropped around the yard. Not what I'd call invasive at all.

It "looks after itself" as melvalena so beautifully stated.

Evergreen and beautiful color all winter, hard not to like this plant.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

  • Posted by ocgf Z8 (My Page) on
    Sat, Dec 17, 11 at 19:07

Ok. Here's more information but it's not conclusive either. See below.

Omar

Here is a link that might be useful: Is Nandina invasive?


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RE: What kind of bush is this

I like nandina and will always have some. I thin out a few stalks every winter, just because I like the way it looks when you can see through it.
Jim


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RE: What kind of bush is this

I've only seen it with whitefly in CA.


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invasive nandina

It doesn't seem to be particularly invasive in rural Fort Worth in the field behind my house.Also I didn't see it around Lake Benbrook where there are a ton of birds to spread the seeds. Privit and Ligustrum are abundant in both areas. Native plant experts Andy and Sally Wasowaski stated in their book that it doesn't choke out native plants in wild stands like the privit and ligustrum species. Personally, I think it's a bit overplanted. I removed it from in front of some floor-to-ceiling windows at my last house. It was not the compact type and kept growing too tall. I was able to kill it organically so it's not all that tough.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

People, just because it's not invasive in your yard, doesn't mean that it's not invasive, or that your plant isn't causing problems for your neighbor.

It doesn't sucker or spread by roots.
It SPREADS BY SEEDS!

That means, the birds eat your nandina berries, fly off somewhere else, and "plant" the seeds.

like rock_oak_deer said:
"I've had a few pop up from seeds dropped around the yard."

Ummm...Do you think the birds just dropped seeds in that one yard? What about the ones that "popped up" where their was no gardener to pull the seedlings out? Ever think about that?

I read the article linked by ocgf.
On the one hand, are official agencies that state that nandina is invasive and is found growing in wild areas where it obviously hasn't been planted by humans.
On the other hand, there is anecdotal "evidence" from gardeners saying: "it's not that aggressive in my yard."

That's not "inconclusive".
Nandina isn't aggressive, but it IS invasive!


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RE: What kind of bush is this

I would estimate Nandina to have been planted in maybe 5% of all landscapes in the Houston area and my area 75 miles away. This plant has been used in landscape for many years. I travel in and out of different peoples yards and also in pastures and forested ares on an ongoing basis.
Ever since I ever new what Nandina was until now I have only seen one(1) Nandina naturalized in the wild.
Some other areas may be different. I don't know.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

I live in a rural area north of Dallas, novascapes, and I have seen no sign of it's naturalizing up here...........not even in my nearest neighbors acreage and he grows absolutely nothing so it would be easy to spot.


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RE: What kind of bush is this

I certainly wouldn't let the fact that someone somewhere has declared nandina 'invasive', keep me from buying one and planting it today, if I wanted it. It has been used, in all it's various forms, in home and commercial landscapes in Texas extensively since at least the fifties, and probably earlier than that. There is one in the yard, in Graham, where my grandparents lived their entire lives, that was there in the fifties. In the early eighties, I was installing commercial landscapes at Model Homes Parks, for General Homes, and the landscape architects would always put a row, or a grouping, of nandinas in at least one of the six or seven model's landscapes.

I have spent a great amount of time, over my nearly 65 years, in the woods, pastures, fields, and prairies in Texas, hunting quail, doves, deer, rabbits,and squirrels, and fishing in lakes, rivers, streams, and stock ponds, and camping in parks and on private land, and have never seen a nandina anywhere except where it was planted in a landscape. This doesn't mean that it doesn't come up from bird dropped seed, but I have never seen it.
Jim


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RE: What kind of bush is this

Since the seedlings around my yard are under the original plants, I assume the seeds were dropped by the plant and not birds.

There are some undeveloped areas nearby and I have never seen a nandina in there even though there have been houses with nandinas around it for more than 20 years.

Went out for a walk and the nandina plants all over the neighborhood look wonderful with their bright berries and the foliage is beginning to turn that great burgundy color it gets in late winter.

However the nandinas got where they are, everyone is enjoying them now.


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