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Whacko wormer

Posted by barbararose21101 8 (My Page) on
Mon, Apr 21, 14 at 11:17

I'm brewing some horse manure for my worms. I'll use it instead of water as needed. ; )


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Whacko wormer

I wuz wunderin' about the same thing. Namely, why use "just" water when you could use "enhanced" water. I was thinking of birch sap. High carbon content. About half the sugar of sugar maple.

Paul


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wackier

The last batch of horse manure had been collected with some kind of big loader and had rocks and other debris. So I screened it and sorted out the perfect puckies and rocks. The result is the prettiest, fluffiest bedding you can imagine. I'm brewing the coarse stuff. I'll have "washed" compost for all obvious uses.
What fun.


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RE: Whacko wormer

You are making horse poo tea for your worms?? I am sure they will absolutely love it. So would your garden.

I have used worm poo tea to inoculate new bedding, such as cardboard or straw. Add it to a bucket full of tea for the last hour. I usually strain my tea in a 5 gallon paint strainer sock. All the leftover tea strainings usually are returned to the bin. WORM CANDY!!!!!

Worms love horse manure, but It is hard to get wet again after it dries out! I have mixed up wheelbarrow loads like I was mixing cement. Get it nice and slushy, then add to a bottomless bin. That might be a little whacky..........


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RE: Whacko wormer

Dirty Water even the bedding loves. Well the weebeasties in the bedding. Or the ones that arrive via the Good Ship Dirty Water.

My Dirty Water is fish tank water.


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RE: Whacko wormer

Most bugs are 'good'... unless they're 'bad'. :) (What do you think I went to all that schooling for?)

My point is: There isn't much in terms of 'microbes' that can't add something useful to things we 'prepare'. As long as we do not inoculate with something "bad", there shouldn't be much chance of harm. HOWEVER...

I fully understand that there are "good" microbes that are "bad" for some things. In my mind, that's a matter of ecology. (Sadly, the scientific discipline of ecology is only REMOTELY associated with the term "ecology" so cavalierly bantered about today.)

Anyway, I take a relatively dim view of "mono-culture" and "sterility" except in VERY special circumstances like an operating room.or intensive care unit. Sometimes "biodiversity" takes an unexpected, and unpleasant, turn, but usually, what that turns into is a broadening of my understanding of 'things'.

Paul


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RE: Whacko wormer

"except in VERY special circumstances like an operating room" Lately I have been thinking about that one. Nature hates a vacuum and a microbe that gets an advantage will take over without the other microbe varieties to give it competition. How come we do not flood operating rooms with good microbes and make the environment conductive to them. Spray all the tools with good guys before using them. Somewhere there is a Chuckie brewing up these guys and experimenting with them.


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microbes

Somewhere among these threads we might reflect on the practice of microwaving food for worms. Doesn't that kill all the microoganisms in it? I imagine that rotting the food in a glass jar with a lid, in a warm place, is better preparation than any kind of cooking ?


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RE: Whacko wormer

It is my understanding that the practice of freezing kitchen scraps before feeding them to worms is primarily to eliminate fly's eggs. In other words, kill 'things' that we don't want in our worm food. Freezing may not kill EVERYTHING in the kitchen waste, but it will kill more than just fly's eggs.

My point is: we use various methods to remove things we don't want. I don't have a 'problem' with microwaving kitchen scraps in the name of 'expediency'. I'm sure - and it has been argued here at this forum - that microwaving, even autoclaving, doesn't kill "everything".

I think I'll climb down off of this particular hobby horse before I get any further 'afield'. I probably should have just written the following:

I don't thing microwaving worm food is "bad" or even "not the best".

Paul


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RE: Whacko wormer

The problem with rotting material with no oxygen is bad things develop like acids or something. This can be overcome by doing something like bokashi. Probably then the material would have to sit under soil a bit before the worms would enjoy it.
I am ok with microwaving or freezing as expedient ways to handle food waste that gets waste material right out of the spouses way. It also busts the cell walls which starts the material along it's way. Putting the material into the bin should have it microbe covered quickly.


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