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Bio Char

Posted by konadog (My Page) on
Sat, Oct 3, 09 at 12:18

Has anyone experimented mixing Bio Char in there worm bins as a way to seed the char?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Bio Char

I have followed conversations in the SCM section about bio char and am curious what you mean with "seed" the char?


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RE: Bio Char

I am also wondering what Bio Char is.

Could someone take the time to explain what it is and how it is made etc.


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RE: Bio Char

Otis11, Bio-char has an immense internal surface area that beneficial micro-fungii (mycorhizae) can colonize. This is the part where the worm bin comes in. I was just wondering if anyone has used this method before.

fosteem1, Bio Char is a process of making charcoal from plant waste, wood, just about anything and using it in your garden. Search for Bio Char or Tera Preta and you will find enough info to last a few weeks :)


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RE: Bio Char

Ok, Thanks for the info.

But??? It is my understanding that worms don't like anything that has been burned. Am i wrong? How would the charcoal get soft enough for the worms to slurp it up?


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RE: Bio Char

I'm not thinking that the worms would eat or process the Bio Char, but it just being in the worm bin mixing with the final product that would be beneficial. I did read something that said that up to 50% could be mixed, but that sound a bit on the high side of things.


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RE: Bio Char

It would then be just as beneficial to add the bio char to the harvested compost and skip the addition to the bin. Or, Better mix up a batch of worm tea and soak the bio char in it. You would still get the microbes colonizing the bio char without taking up room in the bin.

When mixing things that wont break down like bio char into a bin it would be a little hard to know how much to put in. The feed and bedding shrinks all the time. I understand that the feed/bedding mix shrinks down to under 25% of its original volume in a tote type bin. I wouldn't know how much to add.


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RE: Bio Char

Yes. I have biochar in each of my systems. I made it myself. I would say it is in the experimental phase. I imagine benefits for both the biochar and the vermi. The addition of biochar to vermi systems should also make the vermi system more pleasant to deal with. I agree, those interested should "Search for Bio Char or Tera Preta" as there is no way to explain what took weeks of reading without turning this into a biochar forum. It would be like trying to explain vermicomposting in a few sentences on a biochar Forum.


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RE: Bio Char

Great, someone actually doing it. How much have you added to your bins? Did it change anything in regards as to how the worms have been working, like slow down, moving, anything noticeable? I just don't want to wipe out any of my bins.


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RE: Bio Char

Biochar and vermiculture go together like peanut butter and chocolate. Biochar with its nooks and crannies added to the garden without microbes is dead, barron land unfit to grow plants. Vermiculture weebeasties need a place to bring up billions of children. Together they make soil Eden.

Add biochar as a top coat to shreds of coffee tray type material. Eventually, as food is added below and above, both incorporate into the bedding.

How much biochar is added is limited by how much biochar one can make. Like money, land, or chocolate one always wants more.

It is hard to tell if anything has changed in regards to the vermi because I have only had vermi for over a year. Also of the small amount of worms I have, I keep giving away half. Thus I want more worms and more chocolate.

To experiment and spare innocent worms ask for volunteers.

For Halloween maybe dress the wigglers in little ninja costums and invite them to a party in a month old jack o lantern filled with biochar.

Does one char for the vermi or does one vermi for the char?

I add biochar as I add cover shreds, as a function of the moisture level of the bin. As shreds, biochar, is used as a drying agent. A dry bin would get no char. A too wet bin would. I do not drain or have drain pans on the bins. Food that will melt to water is balanced with extra shreds and or char. If the bin is dry, more food is added.

~ May your worms be fruitfull and multiply, leaving good castings in their wake.

Toss in some char and you can be doing it too.


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RE: Bio Char

The following is my opinion and not backed up by any facts. For all I know it is totally wrong. But that is why we are all here, to toss it all down on the table, experiment, and see what we see. And learn from one another.

Biochar that has spent time with vermicastings is a living system. Adding biochar to harvested vermicastings is like mixing oil and water. They will eventually mix but time is part of the living system. The weebeasties need time to get to know one another and form teams, culture, history, soccer teams and tradition. If time is short, and you have biochar, add 'em when ya got 'em.

Room in the bin? There is no room in the bin for biochar? Then let the biochar stay at the stable, near the horses.

Worm tea. Yes. This matches with the idea of adding biochar to a wet bin. The moisture gives the biochar a candle in the window and a welcome mat to the weebeasties. If only adding char to worm tea or worm tea to char, time would be short. No time for square dancing or holding hands.

How much biochar to add. Somewhere between salt on french fries and avalanch. Depends upon how much you have. If ya got it shake it.



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RE: Bio Char

Wow, I haven't checked back in some time, thanks for the responses.

equinoxequinox, your posts made my day, lighthearted and some interesting ideas.

This one makes the most sense and goes along with my thoughts about "seeding" the bio char.

" Biochar with its nooks and crannies added to the garden without microbes is dead, barron land unfit to grow plants. Vermiculture weebeasties need a place to bring up billions of children. Together they make soil Eden. "


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RE: Bio Char

In these 2 experiments they do seem to eat the biochar and prefer it to the pile of food that does not contain it.

http://www.woosworms.com/VermExperiments.html

Oh, and for a good overview of what Biochar is check out the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzmpWR6JUZQ

This post was edited by iamlook on Sat, May 3, 14 at 0:22


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RE: Bio Char

It would stand to reason that the pile with less food would be eaten quicker. I would like to think the experiment was due to more surface area available to grow more weebeasties. The experiment only proved it is quicker to eat less food than more food. I think even the experimenter came to that conclusion.

I do not think it matters for our purposes if the worms eat the biochar or not. It matters how many rooms to rent it has for the microbes and also how much surface area is available to have for nutrients to grab onto. Also it captures excess water and lets it go when it is dry.


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RE: Bio Char

I'm buying a bag of biochar next weekend. To sell me the whole bag they had to order it. I am looking for a small bio char stove that could be used in a fireplace. In the interim, I screen the ashes and put the chunks in the garden. The sales clerk, who has had years of commercial vermicomposting experience, and I, discussed whether the commercial biochar POWDER was as good for housing soil nutrients as shreds or chunks. We tentatively concluded that the powder represented something like a refugee camp with lots of spaces for lots of tiny critters. Might get active faster than the equivalent of a McMansion piece of charcoal.

I'm pretty sure no one on this forum would use charcoal briquets in their worm bin -- esp not the quick-to-burn.
I think some such briquettes might be OK but I am imagining it would be a good idea to break them up & maybe rinse them.

I'll mention, tho probably it doesn't need mentioning, that the charcoal doesn't have to be pretreated, but like pureeing and rotting food, probably speeds up habitation. If you put untreated charcoal in the garden, the soil nutrients will be stored there at some pace or other (as I understand it).

I'll use horse poo tea to condition the biochar powder.


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RE: Bio Char

I have stopped making my own. My experiments were tiny. Instead I purchased Cowboy charcoal. It is natural wood not briquette shaped. The large pieces are for grilling the ones that are too small and the dust is for the worms. When I harvest I toss the larger of these reefs of weebeasties back into the bin.

I would try to use the biochar for something else first. Maybe add into animal feed. Or sprinkle onto deep litter bedding. Or filter water. Or something. It seems too good to just get all dirty at first. Maybe even keep a box in the refrigerator to keep it sweet smelling and then toss the old box to the worms.


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Getting biochar dirty

I 'm not understanding you here. Is the idea of keeping it sweet a joke ?
What old box to toss ?


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RE: Bio Char

Charcoal is often used to prevent odors in refrigerators. It is also used in water filters and air filters. To take pure charcoal and dirty it without getting another use out of it first would be like purchasing an expensive dress and wear it to clean the kitchen floor without ever bothering to wear it to a nice event first.

The biochar reef rather than put into the harvest material could be retained and put back into the worm bin along with new food and bedding. The host of life on the biochar would be like a probiotic for the bin.


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Pre Use

Oh. Thanks. Makes sense.
( I use soda in the frig )


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