Return to the Weeds Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Weed experts, please help!

Posted by eaj2011 none (My Page) on
Thu, May 17, 12 at 12:19

Hi all. I would greatly appreciate help identifying these weeds on my St. Augustine Floratam lawn.

What kind of clover is this with the purple coloring?

Photobucket

What is this weed?

Photobucket

And is this Yellow Sedge?

Photobucket

And this?

Photobucket


Bonus Question: What is this growth on the trunk of my live oak tree? Is it just new branches trying to form in a strange place? or something more sinister? It leaves unsightly nodules when I cut it off.

Photobucket

Photobucket

I've used Scotts Bonus S Weed&Feed twice in the past 3 months, as well as an Image sedge control, but my weeds persist. Any weed kill tips are welcome too.

So...very...desperate.

Thanks.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Weed experts, please help!

The first weed is some kind of Oxalis. The 2nd one is some kind of Tradescantia I think. It grows where lots of water saturates the soil, grows on stilt roots if it has to. Maybe you are watering too much?

So far as using copious amounts of a weed and feed, if they kill your weeds dead, what else will they affect? The tree may be being affected, but maybe not.

St. Augustine grass is cheap, easy to grow and is installed because it makes instant lawn. A very inferior grass for a lawn, it makes a much better vine. Really.

Because of the large areas of lawn with bald spots (St. Aug. grass lawn is mostly blank space), the best advice I have is to feed the lawn and provide good drainage. After awhile, the weeds will retreat. I know it is the practice in FL to constantly obsess after a thick lush lawn, but it comes at a high maintenance cost. When I lived down there, I fed the lawn weakly about every other month, and never used any weed killers. In the cool months, (Nov-Apr) I mowed low, in the hot months, I mowed high. After 2-3 years, people were asking me how it looked so good, because they were doing the weed and feed cycle and still had a lawn with bare spots, weeds, and were spending money they didn't have for lawn services.


 o
RE: Weed experts, please help!

Agree #1 is Oxalis, possibly 2 types, some of which are natives. (The one flower doesn't look like what I would expect from those leaves.) That purple coloring looks like a health issue, nutrient deficiency or effects from the chemicals.

#2 if Tradescantia it would make a 3-petaled flower, likely pink or white. Also looks like Commelina communis, which would make a blue flower with 2 petals. Do you remember seeing any flowers on these?

The growths on the tree are just new branches. Unless you want new limbs there, you can cut them as close to the trunk as possible without damaging the bark.

It looks like it may be time to sharpen your mower blades.


 o
RE: Weed experts, please help!

Yes, Commelina. I couldn't think of that, but I suspect it is Asian Dayflower. When I lived in FL, this weed grew in the gutters of some houses, lawns, cracks in the concrete. That and Moses-in-a-boat (Tradescantia species).


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Weeds Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here