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Nandina Host plant to??

Posted by mirandy z7b AR (My Page) on
Sun, Jan 8, 06 at 11:32

Where do I find info about Nandina and the butterflies or moths that lay their eggs on it? I can't find info anywhere. Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Nandina Host plant to??

Never heard of anything to do with the Nandinas association with that type of wild-life. They do however attract everything from mice to birds and the occasional horse in this area.

Mocking birds, Blue Jays, Cardinals ETC frequent the shrubs regularly picking the berries clean. Then later during the winter months when the sugar cane is cut, the mice come in from the fields tearing up the roots on almost everything.......and every now and again, the horses decide to almost cross the fence to try and mutilate them and the azaleas!!!

I also did some cross referencing on your post for the butterflies and the moths onto Nandina and lucky bamboo, and so far I havent turned up anything, but Im going to call a friend who only grows Bamboo species and ask him if he knows anything!
G


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RE: Nandina Host plant to??

Thank-you riverratspaz for responding. If you find any information please post it.


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RE: Nandina Host plant to??

What does bamboo have to do with Nandina, other than the misleading common name of 'Heavenly Bamboo'? Or am I missing something?

I can't think of any kind of critter that munches exclusively on Nandina, including caterpillars! Heck, even the deer don't like it.


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RE: Nandina Host plant to??

Some birds like nandina berries, and I did find a couple of references to bees liking the flowers, but I don't think this plant has much value to adult butterflies, and certainly not to larval forms in North America - it's native to China and Japan.


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RE: Nandina Host plant to??

Thanks for your help. Looks like I'll have to do a little
detective work this spring and summer and see if they have any value for butterfly gardening. As to the name of Bamboo?? Guess it's because it resembles bamboo canes. If
I get lucky and find a chrysalis on my Nandina I will post that info.


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RE: Nandina Host plant to??

  • Posted by htown North Houston (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 19, 06 at 2:33

Nandina does not serve any purpose for North American butterflies, atleast, I am fairly certain.


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RE: Nandina Host plant to??

Nandina domestica (heavenly bamboo) is considered an exotic, invasive pest in many states. It has escaped cultivation and readily displaces native species. Being an exotic, it isn't likely to be a host to any native insect.

And those pretty berries? They contain hydrocyanic acid (a.k.a. cyanide) and will kill hungry flocks of Northern Cardinals and Cedar Waxwings. A few berries might not hurt a bird, but winter flocks tend to gorge.

This is bad news for a plant so many of us have as foundation landscaping! And y'all are right: it's not a bamboo at all. (And it certainly isn't heavenly.)


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