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Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Posted by Elaine_NJ6 (My Page) on
Fri, Oct 4, 02 at 11:01

My V. trilobum bushes fruited abundantly this year for the first time, but I was disappointed to read on this forum that birds do not eat these fruits. I've been watching the plants carefully, and it seemed to me that the fruits were disappearing, although certainly not as quickly as those of other shrubs, such as dogwoods. However, yesterday I was sitting outside quietly and saw a titmouse grab a trilobum berry, fly to the crabapple tree, and make a meal out of it there.

Yay! And by the way, these shrubs are absolutely gorgeous--the large, abundant clusters of fruit start turning red in early summer and by late summer are the most vivid red you can imaging.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Maybe it depends on your area and what else is available. When I was looking for info on the web I found a few places that listed v. trilobum as one of the best for attracting birds along with nannyberry. I think I read that they usually disappear around January or February but that's good to have berries for them to eat later in the winter when they need it and they will be ornamental for awhile too as a bonus. I only have one that's small and not fruiting yet and would like to add more when I find them at a good price or can get them in a trade. I wonder if they're easy to grow from seed.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I too think it depends on what is around to eat them. Mine used to disappear through the winter, but as other plants have grown, it has reached the point where most of them make it through the winter. With massive amounts of sugar, my ma used to make "cranberry" jelly from them for Thanksgiving. Picking them leaves your hands stinking, don't remember how they tasted, I don't like cranberry jelly, whether from Vaccinium or Viburnum.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

  • Posted by Tern z4 MN (My Page) on
    Sun, Oct 6, 02 at 13:45

I believe most viburnums are what I think of as winter food for birds; the birds don't gulp them down as soon as the berries appear, but as winter goes on they provide food when there's nothing else left. One landscaping for wildlife book I have says that bushes that keep their berries through the fall and winter are even more important to the birds than the ones that are eaten right away in the fall, since the former carry birds through the time when there's little other food available.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I have planted a number of viburnum species, all at the same time about three or four years ago. Most now fruit, but only V. dentatum (arrowwood) and V. trilobun (cranberry bush) fruit abundantly. The arrowwood viburnum berries disappear the minute they ripen, like dogwood berries. The cranberry bush seem to disappear more slowly. Different strokes . . .


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

V. trilobum berries are eaten, albeit more slowly as you've observed. They usually need the freezing action of fall and winter to convert more of the carbohydrates to sugars to be more palatable. Think of it like this: if all the shrubs we plant for wildlife had their fruits eaten within the first few months, what would they eat once the real harsh winter conditions set in? It's like a slow-release of food, and its good. Hey, we plant plants that fruit in spring, summer and fall, so why not ones that effectively "fruit" (via freezing) in winter?


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

My highbush cranberry is beautiful and laden with fruit this fall. Cedar Waxwings and Robins eat the fermented fruit in the spring and act tipsy falling over and flying large objects like the house or windows. Other birds must eat some of the fruits during the winter. I've noticed fewer berries on the shrubs. I'm not watching that closely when the cold weather comes. VAL


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I had been reading that birds don't really like this shrub also even though it is on lots of bird attracting plant lists.

I recieved a small (maybe 6 inch) Viburnum tribolum as a free gift plant when I got my shipment of serviceberry shrubs from Pine Ridge Gardens. I was not sure what to do with it.

After reading this, I have decided on a place for it and have decided to order the Cultivar Wentworth from Fairweather Gardens in the spring. I do need some shrubs that the birds can eat later, not just in the summer and the pictures I have seen of the cranberry bush viburnums with fruit have been just gorgeous.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Elaine-- How are the berries holding up on your
Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)? Its gotten cold this past week and I wonder if the birds are scarfing up the berries or if they were steadily dissappearing before this?

I am deffinately going to order one in the spring.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

  • Posted by coco3 Alberta zone3- (My Page) on
    Mon, Dec 2, 02 at 8:30

I have them growing wild all over the place. I'm sure the birds eat them but later in the winter.They also make great pancake syrup.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Most of the berries are still on the shrubs--right now under several inches of snow. There's continual bird activity in my yard all winter. Lots of cardinals, expecially. There are crab apples, bittersweet, chokecherries, and hollies, in addition to the V. trilobum. I don't see any concentrated activity at any particular plant, but there are always lots of birds around. I think they live in my hemlock hedge, which is several rows thick and quite dense.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I will agree with Nick - a lot of the fruit humans see as "ripe" is not really ripe to the birds which actually consume them. Freezing and thawing make many of the berries palatable. Have patience.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Ordered "Wentworth" from Fairweather Gardens to arrive in the spring. Do I need my common species V. trilobum to pollinate it? (the species is a small 6 inch plant that was a "fee gift" in another plant order last fall. Who knows when it will flower).


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Beware of viburnums with large, showy flowers. They're usually sterile. Stick with the species--which is absolutely gorgeous, by the way.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

V. trilobum, V. opulus, V. sargentii, or V. orientale should all work for pollination.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Last Summer, when I first started adding fruit bearing shrubs for the backyard birds, I was mainly concerned with warm weather fruiting and feeding. But this winter has been deep freeze here in the northest, so I have really learned how much I need to concentrate on fruits that will be available in winter for the local birds. Glad to be adding V. trilobum to my viburnum collection.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

V.t.Wentworth is PURE V.trilobum. It is not a hybrid. It was selected for its more compact growth habit and is not sterile. There is no reason to avoid the plant for wildlife habitat reasons.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Any berries left now in March???


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Yes--still quite a few shrunken berries left on the cranberry bush, although many have been eaten. But even after this bad winter, there's still food out there. Certain berries are especially nutritious and always go fast, ditto the seeds of prairie grasses, but right now there are still chokeberries, some seeds of asters and ironweed, shrivelled up crabapples, and lots of other stuff I just can't see, because the birds are continually feeding off the ground. (I do not feed artificially.)


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Elaine, it suprises me that there is still natural food left . Around here berry bearing shrubs are picked clean and were long ago this winter. Even the barberry shrub fruit, which most winters is not touched is gone.

I have purple coneflower and black eyed susan that still seem to have seeds but can't tell if there are any on the ironweed. I have no asters nor native grases. Will be planting native grasses this spring so hopefully the birds will have some of those seedheads for next winter.

Still, I just plan on adding more berry producing shrubs next year and hope that ones I added last year fruit. Many are small yet and many coming in the spring are going to be too small to fruit but they should grow well.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Remember that different birds eat different stuff, and different birds look for food in different places--on the branches, on the ground, in the bark. The main thing is variety, which is what nature provides (and what we should aim for in our plantings). Juncos and song sparrows are great, but I wouldn't want to be without woodpeckers and cardinals and titmice and vireos.

There's a lot of food left, and a lot of bird and mammal activity all the time. The robins are back, so the ground must be warming up. I think the juncos might have left already. The woodpeckers are very active. The cardinals and chickadees have started to sing. I'm proud to say that there's a lot of food left for them, and I'm happy that the pigeons and starlings stick to my neighbors' feeders and leave my feederless yard alone!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I ordered and recieved a 'Wentworth' which has arrived from Fairweather Gardens, alongwith other Viburnums. Larger than I expected, looks like a really nice shrub. No bloom clusters though. But I will be able to get it growing nicely for blooms next year. They have attractive leaves, just as most of the Viburnums do.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I had my first flock of decar waxwings last week, and I think they finished off the cranberry bush viburnum berries--there were still quite a few left until then (although I only saw the birds in the crabapple and holly).


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

My Dad has some Highbush Cranberries growing wild around his yard. The birds seem to eat them at the end of winter and early spring after the other fruiting shrubs (buckthorn, gray dogwood, red-osier dogwood, nannyberry, arrow wood, etc) have all lost their fruits. I have seen Cardinals, White-throated Sparrows, House Finches, and Cedar Waxwings eat the berries.

It is good to have shrubs in the yard that provide fruits at different times of the year. Cranberry can be beneficial in areas with little late winter and early spring food, as this is the most critical time of year for birds when most food sources have been exhausted.

J


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Both my trilobum shrubs have settled in well. At first my Wentworth was troubled by aphids while the species shub just next to it was not. But I kept squishing off the aphids by hand every day or two and finialy got it under control. Now that we had had all this rain, the two shrubs have grown and grown. The small species shrub has sent out some shoots that are almost as tall as the shoots on the Wentworth and it started out so much smaller this spring. I have great hopes for them flowering next spring.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I planted two Viburnum trilobum, one on each side of my garage. Their flower clusters are beautiful in spring, laying a carpet of white on my driveway with the first gusty winds of spring. The bushes are luxuriously dense, making them an ideal screen for privacy people, and a secure shelter for birds all year round.

This past winter, we didnt get a lot of snow cover here in Minneapolis, so birds had plenty of forage from which to choose -- and they didn't choose cranberries. But the year before was a tough one, with snow seeming like it was going to stay past Easter. That year must have been tough on the birds, but my cranberries remained untouched until one day, just as my wife and I drove up our driveway, a flock of more than 100 Cedar Waxwings fell upon our bushes. We sat there watching the spectacle as the birds gleefully devoured every last berry! It only took them about 10 minutes, and they were off like a cloud of locusts looking for more goodies in our yard. We also have a variety of flowering crab that keeps its cherry-sized fruit all winter, but the Starlings had gotten there first and cleaned them up, so the Waxwings had to move on.

Since the birds didn't eat the cranberries this spring, it smells like "wet dog" all around my garage door now. I made the mistake of turning on the fan in my truck before leaving the driveway, and I had to smell "rover" the rest of the day! Next spring, if the birds don't eat the cranberries before the leaves sprout, I'm going to clip and remove all those stinky berries. But first, I want to find a good recipe for highbush cranberry jelly, so I can harvest a few before the first frost. Anyone have any recipes to share?


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Newyorkrita: I used to have just one specimen of Highbush, that produced very scarce fruits (see other recent thread on Viburnum trilobum), and even then each winter we invariably saw (since it is planted right under our bedroom window and also in sight of the dining room) cardinals or waxwings cleaning it up, one day or another in late winter. But your decision to plant more than one "clone" of this sp. is a wise one I am sure!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Don't remove aphids. If you do, the ladybugs will not come and do it for you. Also, your plants will not develop immunity and will keep getting attacked. I am quite serious about this--after about 9 years of gadening with abolutely no pesticides, my motto is "No aphids, no ladybugs." These days, the presence of ladybugs alerts me to an aphid "problem." Invariably, the ladybugs see the aphids before I do. Even after a bad infestation, the plant snaps right back, and the problem doesn't spread to nearby plants--it usually affects only a single branch.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

One species of aphid I cannot remember the name of is doing TERRIBLE damages to Viburnum trilobum (mostly this sp.) here in the Montreal area. I think it is called the "Snow ball" viburnum aphid, so I suspect it had been introduced with lines of european V. opulus. In some municipal ornamental gardens I saw this summer where the City has planted tons of large native Highbushes, and obviously is not treating them in anyway, almost NO fruits are borne this year! And that is near large wild green spaces where ladybugs must be expected to abound... We have a rather large garden that I have planted several years ago with tons of stuff, mostly native plants (including some ladybug-friendly ones). Some years I didn't even have the time to try and control aphids, for instance on the new shoots of my wild Ninebarks (to say nothing of my roses!), and these were nevertheless almost epidemic: I have NEVER seen a ladybug even coming close to helping me in any way with that!! Good for you and everyone who would happen to live nearby some natural habitat where native ladybugs really abound. But AFAIAC, if I stop working nearly every day from May to June (mostly) at controlling and spraying aphids (with Safer soap), my beloved Highbush cranberry tree would certainly be two to three feet shorter today!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I have found that a plant that is attacked by aphids once--and allowed to survive the attack untreated--will not be attacked again. They seem to develop some type of immunity--perhaps the plants produces toxins after a severe attack (that certainly happens with gypsy moth caterpillars). Except for really nasty killer alien bugs, like woolly adelgids on hemlocks, I really think it's best to do nothing and let nature take its course. As you say yourself, the affected plant may be somewhat stunted, but it will survive. And if it is stunted the year of the attack, it will grow vigorously the next year.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I just removed the worst of the aphids, I was not being fussy about trying to get them all. I had some stunted leaves for awhile but eventually the plant grew out of it and the aphids have mostly dissapeared. I am glad I have the two types of V. trilobum so I can have fruit next year (I hope)!!!!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I saw V. trilobum shrubs loaded with fruit as I was driving by a wooded section of a local road. It was at the edge of someones property, were woodsey shubs were planted to block the view of the houses. Couldn't stop but could recognize the leaves and fruit. Of course, I have no idea if it was the native or 'Wentworth'. It looked great. The cranberry brush Viburnums look amazing in fruit, and it wasn't even fully ripe yet so I know it gets redder!

I saw large native V. triblobum at the local nursery I stopped at end of last week all with nice fruit set. Then I saw many large 'Wentworth' at another nursery yesterday. Hopefully this is a prevue of the way my two cranberry bush Viburnums will look in following years. Can't wait!!!!!!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Mine are gorgeous when in fruit (now). And the show lasts, because the birds do not eat the berries until late winter or spring. I grow only the pure species but have 5 or 6 individuals. Tons of fruit. The colors are so gorgeous they look fake.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

"Pure species"? Is 'Wentworth' somehow an impure Viburnum trilobum? Did Johnson Nursery do something wrong by planting out thousands of V. trilobum seeds and picking 'Redwing' for its superior attributes? They are all members of the species, one no more "pure" than another. I'd encourage people to try the various cultivars.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Whats the difference between the Viburnum trilobum, American Cranbery bush Viburnum, and the Viburnum opulus, European Cranbery bush Viburnum escept that one is native and one not??


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

  • Posted by euka ottawa (zone 4) (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 11, 03 at 11:54

I don't know what species mine is, but the birds do not seem to like the berries (which I think look yummy but haven't tasted myself :) It's a giant which I prune like crazy so I can still get to my back yard, and bears lots of fruit! I have seen the squirrel pick a bunch and eat them like grapes off the stem, but otherwise, they stay on till spring and get all stinky and rotten. This past spring, I couldn't handle the yucky smell and I clipped them all off and composted them. Wonder why the birds don't want them?


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I haven't tasted them, but I have heard that v.opulus doesn't taste as good as as v.trilobum (for humans or for birds). Opulus is easier to find in nurseries, but I'd choose trilobum for wildlife. I'll admit that I don't have either one in my yard. Colonial Williamsburg is the only nursery around here that I've seen with trilobum; the regular nurseries have almost all non-native viburnums. Most of the opulus seem to have a smaller growth habit, if nursery tags are to be trusted. Oh well, I'm still shoppingfor the right ones.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

There are a few minor differences, such as the shape of the leaves and whether or not the upper surface is strigose (bristly hairy on V. trilobum) but the main identifying characteristic is based on the petiole glands. These are small warty growths on the petiole (leaf stem) close to where it meets the base of the leaf. On V. opulus these will be distally depressed (be cuplike in shape), whereas on V. trilobum they will simply have rounded tips.

If that's too confusing, taste a berry and if it's rather tart and perhaps difficult to swallow but not all too disgusting, it's V. trilobum. If upon tasting the fruit you instantly start gagging and spit for about 10 minutes, it's V. opulus.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I like the taste test route, lycopus :oD. These wouldn't have any purgative or laxative properties, would they? And where in the continuum does the Asian relative V. sargentii land?

I sense Kevin starting a Culinary Viburnum and friends thread.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

VV--funny you mention that. My 7 year old son and I went around to all the Viburnums for a taste test. We spit alot! If I remember right, the only ones worth swallowing were V. prunifolium and V. lantana 'Mohican'(or was it 'Allegheny'?). Either way, the blueberry bushes are much more attractive to my palate.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

V. trilobum berries, I now know, remain on the plant until the next spring, when the cedar waxwings devour them. There have to be some "pantry" fruits that remain on the bushes until spring, or else birds would not survive until next year's seeds and insects are available.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Many thanks to lycopus!
I have never met ANYBODY - not even nursery people! - who could sort these two out!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

lycopus- Thanks for the information on the differences between the two. I don't have any V. opulus so no taste test here (although it doen't sound like something I want to do!!!).

Funny that some places the V. Opulus is easier to find in local nurseries than the V. trilobum. Here there is not a V. opulus to be found at any local nursery and I have visited a lot of nurseries around here. Even the V. trilobum is only found in a few nurseries, not most of them.

I was going to ask if V. opulus and trilobum cross pollinate each other but I was re-reading this message thread (a very good one) and see that Kevin posted on Jan 16th that (and I quote)

"V. trilobum, V. opulus, V. sargentii, or V. orientale should all work for pollination."

That is very good as I am deffinately adding V. sargentii 'Onondaga' next spring and am now looking into V. opulus types that I might want. I have never heard of V. orientale or noticed it offered in any catalogs I can remember.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

V.orientale is very rare. I have seen it two places, my yard and at the place I bought it, and will perhaps be seeing it at Viburnum Valley soon! It is the Asian version of V. opulus/trilobum. So far, it appears to have superior leaf quality, being thick, glossy, and still perfect at this time of year, in comparison to the mostly tattered, spotted leaves of the relatives. It fruits heavily as well. I am waiting on fall color. My plant originated from a mother plant that came from seed from the Shanghai Botanical Garden.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Well, then, what is V. sargentii? I thought that was the Asian version of V. opulus/trilobum ?????


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Asia is a big place Rita. V. sargentii hails from northeast Asia, and V. orientale is native to Asia Minor and the Caucasus.

V. sargentii is rated hardier, to zone 3, while V. orientale is rated to zone 6. Look 'em up, and study the plants when you ultimately succumb to the desire to have one of each of all of them :')


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Was back at the Nursery today that I saw the large burlapped 'Wentworth' Viburnums at in August. To my amazement all except one of the shrubs were gone. The one left was in a sorry state, no leaves on the shrub at all but still some gorgeous bright red berries.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I heard somewhere that the birds don't like the fruit of V. opulus as well as they do the fruit of V. trilobum. Don't know if thats true or not but someday will be able to do my own comparison as I mail ordered two V. opulus that I should get this week so when all my shrubs fruit, I will have the birds compair them!

Now, I have a great area in my yard that I was not going to do anything with next Spring but I am thinking of an alternate plan. For once, I don't have to dig anything out of where I want to plant, just cover up some grass with bagged leaves for mulch. Anyway, for those of you that have a 2003 Oikos Tree Crops Catalog, on the inside back cover there is a color picture of V. trilobum 'Flava' in fruit. It has yellow fruits! Of course, since they sell seedling, not clones,it saiz the fruit will vary from yellow to orange. They also have a 'Phillips' that has larger dark red fruit. And at $1.20 apiece if you go for the 25 lot, you can't beat the price. Oikos stuff is small but I was originially going to wait and plant nothing there until at least 2005 so if I plant even really small stuff (6 inches) then I still have at least a year for the small stuff to get bigger that it would not have been there growing and getting larger, if I am making any sence.

How far apart to plant 6 inch seedling V. trilobum shrubs to make a hedgerow effect? I want them to grow together and buying extra plants is no problem so want to put them as close together as will work for them.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Fortunately or unfortunatly, depending on how one looks at it, a really nice upscale local nursery started their half price on all shrubs and trees sale this weekend. I had seen some lovely 'Wentworth' Viburnum trilobum there earlier this summer. Those were both too large for me to manage and too much money. But in late September I did notice some nice three gallon 'Wentworths'. I wasn't going to pay ful price for them and decided that if there was still one around at half price time, I should get it. So today I picked up two shrubs for the normal price of one. These are nice 3 gallon 3-4 foot tall and very bushy. They only had three and one was just awful looking so I got the two nice ones. They don't have any berries on them but I figgure they are plenty large enough to bloom and set berries next year. I had wanted another 'Wentworth' and now I am set!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I've seen birds eat the berries when they first mature. I guess they don't know they are supposed to wait until winter.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I hope both my American and European Cranberry bush Viburnums come thru the winter all right. I temporarily planted them in the veggie garden until spring. But its been such a cold winter. Then of course I need them to pollinate each other assuming I even get blooms.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I do recall that V. trilobum first bloomed pretty quickly - mine at only about 2-1/2 ft tall. I suppose that a sunny exposition and good loamy + wet soil would help for this sp.
...But still those attractive red clumps have found no clients yet this winter, in spite of those awe-inspiring arctic cold spells we have also had...
Lots of Common Redpolls at the tistle feeder though!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Well, this past weekend I dug up, or really just needed to pop out, my two Wentworth V. trilobum that were Wintering in the veggie garden and put them in their permantent homes. I also moved the two V. opulus 'Xanthocarpum' from the winter homes in the veggie garden. They are now in a shrub grouping I have on the oposite side of my house from my ever increasing shrub border started last year.

Both the V. trilobum and V. opulus are starting to leaf out at what looks like the same rate so I hope they flower at the same time to set berries.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Hi! I have just ordered some seedlings (v.trilobum, gray dogwood, black elderberry) to replace haitat that was destroyed. I have absolutely no experience with v. trilobum. Does it self seed or propagate in any way?
Thanks
Allie


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I think you need 2 to get berries same as elderberry. Sarah


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

No you don't need two to get berries (and the same goes with elderberries). But two of those V. trilobum coming from different seed sources will cross-polinate and give MORE berries, that's for sure.
V. trilobum propagates very easily by layering (a small branch bends to the ground then at some point takes root, that you can separate under the right conditions then transplant elsewhere), perhaps also by its own seeds, but the soil conditions must be the right ones I gather (a little acidic and quite wet). Make sure it has some sun too.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

My V. trilobum 'Wentworth' are blooming now and one of my V. opulus is blooming at the same time also. So we will see if I get fruit. I sure do hope so.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Trilobum can be easily propagated from air layering, as described above. I am continually moving rooted pieces to new locations.

Mine is almost finished blooming. V. prunifolium was finished a week or so ago, and V. dentatum (arrowwood) is about to start.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Many of last's year's V. trilobum berries were uneaten, even in late winter and spring. It's a beautiful plant, however, and it's important to have something available for the end of the very worst winters (as 2002-3 was around here).

A totally unrelated (or maybe not) factoid--my V. trilobum are just about done flowering, and there seems to be much less fruit set than last year or the year before. With viburnums, you can see the swollen ovaries almost immediately after flowering, and I see very few, maybe just a couple per flower cluster, as opposed to full bunches for the past two years. Interesting--maybe viburnums have mast years like oaks and beeches. My single V. prunifolium seems to have set more fruit than in past years--not a lot, but definitely more. Too soon to tell for V. dentatum.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

  • Posted by vonyon z5 New England (My Page) on
    Sat, May 22, 04 at 15:22

I wonder if the fruit set is directly related to how much fruit was left on the plant? Like, if you dead head flowers, they continue to produce. Not that I know enough about it to make this assumption, but I'm curious.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Hi,

Just discovered this thread. I just bought a large Viburnum 'Wentworth' at a sale for $30. I was tickled. It is about 4-5 ft high already. Very healthy looking. I couldn't find out from the nursery whether or not this variety has any color to the foliage in the fall. Can someone here tell me? I read somewhere from a Google search today that it turns purple in the fall. True?

I also wanted to know should I plant it in morning sun with afternoon shade or morning shade with afternoon su or full shade or full sun? How wide should I expect it to get. I believe it is supposed to get 10 ft high. Also, if I plant it next to a walkway, will it drop fruit that stain on the ground? Will I need another viburnum in order to get berries? Does it have to be the same kind or any kind of Vibrunum?

Also, I would like to add more Viburnums to my yard. I want to get one with large fragrant blossoms if I can. I want to get one that turns yellow/orange in the fall and one that turns red/purple/or orange in the fall. Also want berries and don't want a sterile one, although I just love the doublefile.

Last question..lol. Where are you all referring to ordering viburnum bushes?

NewYorkrita, what is this about Viburnums for $1.20 apiece? LOL Can you explain whether you order seedlings from a company, and if so, how old and how large are they when you get them? Do you have to buy 25 at once? If so, do you actually have room for all those? Is the company good and is the material healthy? Do you plant them in pots until they get bigger? Do you do that with other trees and shrubs?

Thanks,
Adam


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

The 1.20 apiece referred to last years price for Viburnum trilobum seedlings at Oikos Tree Crops for quantities of 25 and up. Yes, you have to buy them all at once and they are small. 3-4 inches, I think. This years prices are higher at Oikos. I never did buy them and have decided not too because I now have 4 Viburnum trilobum and thats enough for me.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Adam: Check out this website. Rita recommended it to me last year. I have been raving about them this year on here. You have to buy 10 minimum of whatever you order. The exception would be a package like Wildlife Package or dogwood package where you buy one of each type of dogwood (they actually sent 5 of each). I bought a lot of shrubs from them (in excess of 150) and they were pretty good size for state extension service shrubs. Some were small like the serviceberries which were about 8-10" or the elderberries which were sticks with some little leaf buds (they had decent roots though). The v. cassinoides were the largest at about 10" by 10". They are now as big as the ones that I paid $22 from N.E. Wildlife Society last fall. Most (including the elders and the serviceberries) are now growing like weeds and are quite healthy. I also ordered various other shrubs from a couple of other mail order places and none can compare to the stuff I got from NH Nursery. The best part is that I paid about $1 per shrub for them. I will definitely reorder next year. I thought 10 was going to be a lot, but I'm happy I got that many as the rabbits have eaten a couple of serviceberries already. I have a rather large lot and will just keep expanding my border and adding new ones to cut down on the amount of lawn I have.

As for the answers to your other questions, my understanding of viburnums is that you don't absolutely need another to pollinate (as you would with holly), but you will increase the fruit with another type that blooms at the same time to cross pollinate. Personally, I don't think I'd put a fruiting tree or shrub near a walkway. I've even tried to keep them a bit away from the house because I don't want the siding to be stained. I think I remember the trilobum leaves turning colors in the fall, but maybe someone with more experience will post an answer or you may consider posting a new thread with these questions. Several experts read and post here and should be able to answer your questions, but may not find this post buried in the old thread.

Here is a link that might be useful: NH Nursery


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I have some fruit on two of my Wentworth Viburnum trilobum even though I only had one flower cluster of my V. opulus to pollinate them. Hope to do better next year. The berries are very attractive looking though, even if they are not ripe yet. The yellow berries on the V. opulus are quite eye catching also.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Just watched a mockingbird feasting on V. trilobum berries right now, when they're fresh, ripe, and abundant, and lots of other fruits are also available. Guess he didn't read this thread.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

That's encouraging Elaine. I'm sure the mockingbird wasn't eating the trilobum berries as a last resort in YOUR yard since you have planted so many different shrubs for wildlife. It's nice to hear when something so ornamental is good for wildlife too.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I would be interested in knowing if anyone has used the highbush cranberry in a hedge. I would like to keep it 8 feet high or less, but the width is my concern. If I plant it like a maze, how far apart in the rows, and in the alleys, do I have to plant it. I would like the finished alleys to be about 4 feet wide for walking.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Dennis, I have heard that they sucker. From what I have seen, the branches grow low along the ground. I'm guessing they root there, so I bet the do end up as a wide thicket. I know that I asked the question a year ago. You may want to search it up. I believe mine are staggered in rows about 4 feet apart, but I'm trying to get a clump. Hopefully that is close enough.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

My V trilobums have been stripped of berries already (birds and squirrels don't have internet access). Unfortunately I have too many deer for most shrubbery to survive.

Dennis, My 20 year old trilobums (never pruned (except by deer)) are about 12' high and just as wide. They haven't sent up suckers that I've seen ( deer again - most likely although I do also have a groundhog problem).


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Maybe I'm using the term sucker incorrectly. I notice that the edge branches hang down low to the ground and root.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Vonyon,

I planted my 3 V trilobums about 15 years ago, and have never noticed either suckers or tip layering, But this is most likely due to browsing by the deer(and/or groundhogs), the branch tips have always been above the ground and haven't had a chance to form roots. I think that the branch tips would form new bushes (because they are easy to propagate from cuttings).

Dad


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Any branch that gets covered in mulch roots so its easy to get new plants. I had to move one of my 'Wentworths' this spring and I had many new starts around it.

All my "Wentworths' have some blooms this spring (not open yet) and so does my species V. trilobum. Plus as a bonus my V. opulus are going to bloom too. I should get great berry set this year!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Amazing reading this 3-year thread!..I just bought a v. trilobum (compacta) from Home Depot..all viburnums on sale. Mine is 3-ft tall and healthy with a slight red blush to a few of the leaves..I may not get flowers/berries this year, but I'm told it looks nice in the fall..Hope so!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

This year I am getting the best fruit set on my Wentworths and also on my V. opulus this year. The fruit on Wentworth is starting to get a red blush to the green on some of the clusters so you know its starting to ripen. Plus my V. opulus have really filled in and just look spectacular this year after flowering most heavily finially thios spring. It does take time but I am pleased with the way all the shrubs in the yard bird habitat are coming along.

Wentworth is at least 8 feet tall!


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

another valuable viburnum thread


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

Wow what a great thread. I just purchased three red wing this year and thought they would pollinate each other but i think i read i need V. opulus or a different shrub now to pollinate? Hope i have room for all of them. LOL.~~~~~Bonnie


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I purchased what was labeled as an American Cranberry Bush from Home Depot this past spring after the late freeze. It looked healthy and was on sale for $6.00. The picture looked really pretty and the information said birds love the berries. I was not surprised it did not flower after planting but am hoping it does next spring. Reading through this thread makes me wonder if the cranberry bush needs a pollinator? I am sure someone here can answer that question for me. We are having very hot/dry weather here in TN and even though I believe I am keeping it well watered some of the "older" leaves are turning a "reddish" color. The planting directions said full sun. Does this plant really do well in full sun?

Thanks in advance to anyone who replies.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I have two of these bushes that I need to plant this fall. I've got two spots in the yard-- one is on the southwest, somewhat warm and dry corner of the house, which gets sun most of the day. The other spot is in the boggy, semi-shaded back corner of the yard (truly-- if you dig down there's peat, and it stays pretty moist all year). Any thoughts on whether the plant's adaptable enough for either spot, or if one would be better?


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

I sure do remember this old thread. Lots of time has gone by and my Wentworth Vivurnums have grown large and fruit heavily each year now. In fact my entire plant fruiting shrubs to attract backyard songbirds plan has done very well. And the shrub border looks great too.


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RE: Viburnum trilobum (cranberry bush)

There is a hedge of Viburnum's near me. Between that shrub row and the mature holly trees, the mockingbirds seem pretty happy. I see them going back and forth between the shrubs and trees all day long.


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