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Moving Jack in the Pulpit

Posted by lisa2004 NY Z6 (My Page) on
Tue, May 2, 06 at 7:41

I found a few growing in the woods behind my house (my property) and would love to move them into my woodland garden. How do I go about doing this? Is this a good time or should I wait? Also, the soil where I would put them is pure compost, but it doesn't hold water well. Would I have to water them every day? I don't want to mess this up. Thanks!


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

  • Posted by kwoods Cold z7 Long Is (My Page) on
    Tue, May 2, 06 at 12:21

They are pretty adaptable. Move a small one on a rainy day and see how it does. I like to move them around after they go dormant but you would have to mark them now to do that. Not sure if it matters, they usually all make the move without complaint.


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

Jacks are easy to move. I transplant early morning, eveving and on cloudy days. A good soaking once a week this year and then they should be able to take care of themselves.


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

If you found only a few, please don't denude the woods to move them to the garden. Instead, mark the spot and return in September to collect some Jack berries.

Clean the red pulp from the berries (wear rubber gloves, it can irritate skin) then scatter the seeds in the area of the garden where you want Jacks. Next spring you will have them.


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

how many years for a jack to bloom when started from seed?
thanks!


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

Mine bloomed in the third year. The first year they were rather small, then about a 9" tall in the second year, but no bloom until the third. I simply scattered the seed in the Fall directly on the ground and covered them with leaves. I know it is recommended to remove the seed coat, but I didn't bother with any of that (the seed was fresh) and I had a high germination rate.


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

They need leaf mold to germinate. I just take the red heads in the fall and bury them as they are. Nature deals with the red stuff.
Since it is all my property I take them as I find them and move them forward into my gardens. They are a corm or bulb so dig DEEP when moving them. You have to get the bulb. I want to see them up close. Lately I have been taking them in the fall. Cut the red head, bury it and leave it to re- bloom. It takes a few years. The forest can wait, I cannot.


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

interesting. i have a tiny jack looking thing in my garden. it seems to have come up the third year in a row this year. it stays extremely small and no bloom. maybe i scattered a seed i forgot about. it is also in an area where i transplanted one. i am very confused by it! :)


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

you mean its leaves look like a jack? It could easily be a baby. given time it will bloom.


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

t-u, arcy!


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

I am being forced to move from my longtime home and in the past few years, I have been working to propagate Jack in the Pulpits, which appeared on the north side of my house. Now I must leave my home and I want to take these plants with me. Can I pot them and take them with me? Will they survive in a pot? How do I do this?

Also, I hate leaving my hardy little lilac bush and my pear tree. Is there some way that I can get clippings from these and take them with me in pots as well? I want to take as much from my home as I can to wherever I end up going. Thanks for any and all advice given!


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RE: Moving Jack in the Pulpit

Jacks move easily. Not sure where yours are in the growing process. Mine are just peeking out. If you dig deep enough and get a good clump it is possible to not even disturb the roots and corm. I have moved mine around my lot often. I have some in pots that do return each year. Now or after they begin die back are the best times. If you move them while they are blooming they may die out but will return next year. The lilac you can also dig a clump of root stock out. I was told doing this will shock the new clump and it will take five years to bloom..you may be better off just starting from nursery stock.


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