Return to the Garden Writers Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Most irritating expressions in 2004

Posted by hotpink z5 ON Canada (My Page) on
Sun, Jan 9, 05 at 16:59

It must be winter in Canada - WHERE is the sun??????????? what else can be responsible for my foul mood, but is anyone else tired of these words - some of which are the most irritating expressions of 2004?

BLOG and its variations, including blogger, blogged, blogging, blogosphere. Many who nominated it were unsure of the meaning. Sounds like something your mother would slap you for saying.
"Sounds like a Vikings drink thats better than grog, or a technique to kill a frog." Teri Vaughn, Anaheim, Calif.
"Maybe its something that would be stuck in my toilet." Adrian Whittaker, Dundalk, Ontario. "I think the words journal and diary need to come back." T. J. Allen, Shreveport, La.

OR two words that (previously used to mean something only to people having problems in the bedroom) that are now even making ME worry even if I'M NOT HAVING IT between Friday night and Monday morning:

ER*CTILE DYSF*NCTION Do we need to hear about it daily on TV and radio, even on racecars? Firmly rejected by the committee. "Too much information!" Carolyn Jamsa, Chillicothe, Ill.

If I hear one more Viagra ad I'll scream!


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

I didn't invent the word Blog and I don't care for it much but since that is what it is commonly called, I use it. Irritating words and Phrases? How about OH MY GOD! I can correctly predict that anyone on TV who is surprised will utter it, especially females. If you don't agree, turn on the TV.
And then like there is like the word "like" not used in the proper context as a comparison. That is like so stupid. I know a person with a doctorate degree that like says it all the time and it makes her appear uneducated. Like if I keep on like saying it, notice how obnoxious it becomes?
"She goes" and "He goes" instead of she said, he said.
It's just valley girl talk but TV and the movies have made it prevalent. And while I am on the (invited) rant, I think the non-gender y'all, which means you all is inheriently more correct than calling girls guys. You asked.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

LOL and DH make me shudder, I don't know why. At least ROTFL has some interest that LOL lacks. But these are really only mildly irritating, and pale in comparison to the most abused phrase of 2004, "core values."


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

...or...after someone finishes a statement, the listener
responds with an emphatic "exactly!"
Exactly what?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Hello hotty strange weather eh? One day brass monkeys the next ..who knows.
I am not the kind of guy that gets irritated easily, mosquitoes do it and know it all cashiers do it but other than that: expressions? Mmnn.
"Raising the bar."
I share the horror at OMG! really? get a life (there's another one).
"Thank you for sharing" has me walking towards the gun cabinet.
All and every word that comes out of the mouth of 'what's his face' the evangelical guy named after a well known shrub. Him.
As someone who has never had any problems with erecting a tent my advice is to get yourself down to Canadian Tire talking of which hotty, that guy with the beard? Irritating?
Well, LOL and ROFTFL from moi and the DW.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

"hotty"? I haven't heard that one. As a parent of a new teenage, the one I hear ALL the time is "dude".


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Eddie I feel so much better that you said you didn't like the word "blog" even though you use it. It's just that all words that start with "bl" and are usually evil sounding like blasted, bloody, bludgeoned, bleedin', blot on society, blahs, etc. but now that I know even you don't like it I feel much, much better. I actually DID think you'd invented it, because I saw it first on "Eddie's Blog" when I happened to be voyeuring around your very interesting website one day back last summer. As for Poppa what can I say, he was brought up on the farm and probably doesn't know any better.

Diggin': When I first read "DH" I thought it meant "dumb half" - first thing that came into my head! I thought this was such a callous website until I later realized it must mean "dear husband" because literally everybody was writing it and they couldn't all be married to idiots. By the way, what DOES "ROTFL" stand for? Don't tell me if it's something dirty!

Linlee: I have a personal thing about a listener responding with the words "exactly" after someone else made a statement. It's like this: A few times in my life when in amongst a large group of people I've been shy and stuck for words I've attempted to take the plunge and speak off the cuff but, before I've had the chance to say anything, other people have jumped in ahead of me and said precisely what I wanted to say, word for word. This has happened many, many times. This has made me go to the extreme of being quite dyslexic and coming out with the word "exactly" at the end of the speaker's comment, much to my chagrin. I do believe this has become a habit with me now, to the point where I have "exactly" down pat at the end of many conversations. So I put it to you that maybe "exactly" means just that - exactly what the 2nd speaker was trying to say but never got a chance!

Ha Inky, that "gun cabinet" cracked me up, you're hilarious! I can erect a tent in 3 seconds flat - the ones with the long fibreglass poles, that is. I can paddle across George Lake in Killarney Provincial Park topless (with a half dozen bees chasing me from behind in the process) now that it's legal, bet you can't boast of that! What's that song "the only one who could ever reach me? touch me? teach me?.... I forget....was the sweet talking son of a preacher man"? Speaking of which, someone from 'down east' told me this one: Q. "What's the difference between a geneologist and a gynocologist? A. A geneologist looks up your family tree; a gynocologist looks up your b*sh." Oh well, Ink, something to warm us up in this cold weather we're having eh?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by John_D USDA 8b WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Jan 11, 05 at 23:03

"It's just that all words that start with "bl" and are usually evil sounding like: blackberry, blackbird, blazing star, bloom, blossom, blush, bluebell, blueberry, . . . .


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

ROTFL - since no one has ever spelled it out (we don't have time) it means Rotten Old Time Farts Lying (with the emphasis on lying). Thanks for the compliments on my webby. Oh BTW, (bite the wench) I despise chopped words like rhodies and veggies and webby and blog and.....but, once again, I am in the distinct minority. So you rowed across George lake topless? Do you have pictures to prove it? Okay, I lied about ROTFL, I think it really means Roll Over To Feel Loved. ALright, alright, I just know someone somewhere out there is reading this and is Rolling On The Floor Laughing.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Let's see...the most irritating expressions are so many that I tried to block them all out. After all, why let them rent space in my head when the idiots who put them there in the first place didn't pay up.

I would rather describe the people that put them there than try to regurgitate the contents of those reprobates little minds.

Those that irk me the most have no morals and landblast those that do with their lack thereof. It is shameful the way some go on thinking that they are enlightening others with their lack of imagination which excludes anything that is legal or appropriate in the presence of a God-fearing grey-haired grandma. If they wouldn't say it in front of one of those angels, why should they harrass the average moral person with their licentious bullsh*t?

And last, but not least, what irks me the most in 2004 is the disrespect people have for authority these days. Whatever happened to that? Are we so disrespective of ourselves and our parents that we have no respect for anyone anymore?

Makes you wonder if there is a traitor living next door because we can no longer figure out who is for us or against us as they both sound the same in many circles today.

I don't think it is the expressions that irritate me the most, it is those that use them and they would irritate me no matter what year it is.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Anathema: "massive," "absolutely," and all the terminology now associated with the war in Iraq. (but I don't want to get into it for fear of getting flamed by some holier-than-thou fascist...)
I can't understand why I've never heard anyone else complain about the ubiquitous misuse of massive....


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

hotpink,
It's not the use of the word "exactly" that's the bother.
It's a perfectly fine word. I think it's the way it's being said that ticks me off.
Having taken to listening to Talk Radio while working at home, it
seems that the going response from the callers to the host
is "egg-zackly"...stressing the "egg".
Maybe it's simply time to turn off the radio.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

hey Eddie, I'm ROTFLMAO! Let's see what you can do with THAT one.

My DH heard a commercial that used the term LOL and thought it meant "Lot of Luck." (In this case, DH does stand for Dumb Half.)

My personal most irritating was the widespread use of the red state/blue state issue. If you believe the columnists, Eddie and I shouldn't be trading barbs on this forum, since he is a "red stater" and I am a "blue stater" and therefore we are mortal enemies. Or maybe you want to believe that pink, INK and I are country mates. Anyway, this whole red state/blue state nonsense is such a broad oversimplification it makes me nuts. It's politically incorrect to generalize about someone based on their skin color, sex or ethnic background, but geographic location is now fair game.

Okay, as long as pink brought gynecologists into this discussion, I'll tell you the phrase that really irks me - "peed my pants." I have always peed urine; once or twice I have peed in my pants but I have never, ever peed my pants. That's almost too painful to contemplate...

And speaking of ubiquitous, there's that acronym "WMD". I heard today that they officially stopped using that phrase last month.

V.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

I find all office buzz words both annoying and ineffectual.

"Strategically aligned"
"Team player"
"Sprinting north"
"Communicate"

The list goes on and on. The actual words have been so bastardized that they usually have little meaning left, other than to curiously infer membership in a rather esoteric, club of supposed elitism.

Did any of those people who used to endlessly use the word "paradigm" have the foggiest idea of what a paradigm actually was? I used to have great fun by playing dumb and asking them to explain what it meant. This created many an opportunity to ROTFL.

IronBelly


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Politicians looking for a chummy word run neck and neck with those guys IB. Remember when they were looking to get the economy moving and were not sure whether to jump start it kick start it or buy a new battery? Now we have a 'road map' whatever happened to 'plan' but I guess that has a plainer meaning. BTW (Beasts Turned Wilder) the way I heard it was than WMD was a phrase made up to cover the fact that a certain person had a prollem (another one) with saying 'nueceler'.
Gotta go I am heading to George Lake with my binoculars and easy to get up tent.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Ink, that WMD rumor sounds like something you got from the internets.

And here I thought BTW meant Bush Turned Whacky.

I hate to nit-pick your post, but should that be an "easy-to-erect" tent? Or is it dysfunctional?

V., deep in fog (literally, not figuratively and how many people get that one wrong?)


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

It is part of the joke V. "easy to erect" seemed too obvious.
The difference between a geneologist and a gynocologist is that one looks up your tartan and the other looks up your kilt.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

WMD, worst TLA of the year.

>Makes you wonder if there is a traitor living next door because we can no longer figure out who is for us or against us ...

If there's anybody at all next door, he's sure to be a traitor, unless he has a "united we stand" bumpersticker, in which case you may relax and assume he's got good "core values". Unless he's got a dark beard, isn't married to someone of the opposite sex, fails to carry a gun, criticizes your government for violating the Geneva convention, or listens to public radio, in which case he's no good and you'd better raise your security alert level to orange, maybe even fuscia.

ROTFCMP - DTD


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

DTD - SB ROTCIMP!

V., LOL


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

V, did you leave out the F word?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Dang! I hate it when I screw up a good joke like that - it's like going all the way through one of those story jokes, only to realize you said the punchline bass ackwards.

let's try again:

DTD - SB ROTFCIMP!

V., LOL


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 13, 05 at 13:01

I loath the trend of making nouns into verbs (e.g. "Let's party!" and "That mistake will impact our bottom line.").

Also, putting "ize" at the end of words that have no business being "ized," such as "prioritize" (instead of "to make a priority of").


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by John_D USDA 8b WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 13, 05 at 13:47

So do I.

One of my neighbors bought a house with a paved front yard. But he fixed it by "gardenizing" it. (His term.)


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

John, you should send INK to his gun cabinet to "coffinize" that neighbor.

V.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 13, 05 at 14:46

Dang. I meant to put an "e" at the end of "loath". I am loath to admit I made a typo.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Veronicastrum..just got back from up North, not bad just a four hour drive but found out that Inks "easy to put up tent" was a lot harder than I had thought, and mine was way too smallso things werent very comfortable to say the least his was bigger than I ever imagined too (and size does matter with tents). Anyway, it was "cold enough to freeze the b*lls off a brass monkey" up there and some animal bit a hole in the tent and stole my w*rming gel. So what if we didnt get to ROTF. AFOBO eh V? summer camping is not very far away!

Sleepless in Southern Ontario..
HP


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Oooo hot pink, what a titilating story.
Cady mde me think of one more expression I loathe: "disrespected". I grit my teeth every time i hear that one and oddly enough, I have seen journalists use it - they, of all people, who should be protecting the integrity of our beautiful language.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 15, 05 at 22:01

While we're at it, affluent suburbanites who use the latest hip-hop, urban youth slang ("Yo, you down w'dat?") really annoy me.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by John_D USDA 8b WA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 15, 05 at 23:00

Eddie:
Unfortunately many journalists aren't writers.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

On another forum someone mentioned he was interested in getting into, "greenhousing."
Perhaps this explains why the gardening for dummies books are more appealing to some rather than the high end garden books/articles.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

I am more irritated by the use of initials instead of words. Are we all so busy that we cannot type the complete word? Do we appreciate our alphabet, but shun language? If the use of acronyms (itself an American word) has become diluted to "first letter only", can using the number 4 in lieu of "for" be far behind? It all makes me think of my grandfather saying that the faster we go, the behinder we get.

Just F4T (food for thought).


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

DH often uses the business expression `going forward as in the following example: "This is the way we want to use this software for business going forward." This expression doesnt irritate me, merely makes me curious. I honestly dont know of any other way, not being personally gifted in karmic capabilities.

~~~

The first time I ever saw "BYOB" actually written on a party invitation my eyes nearly popped out of their sockets I thought it was something rude or kinky.....and actually was beginning to get second thoughts. Then I realized thats a description of something people do after the BYOB and an inner voice said "Go straight to party but pick up beer first"!


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

most irritating words :
" I now have a mandate"

like he even knows what the word means without someone telling him first.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jan 19, 05 at 9:48

Is that on par with "cashing in on political capital"?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Don't you find "God bless" presumptuous, as though someone who believes in God is giving him (her) orders?

God bless,
Pinetree


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by John_D USDA 8b WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jan 19, 05 at 17:36

I consider it wishful thinking, often indulged in the most by those who deserve it least,


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Ironbelly,
A paradigm is still a nickle short of a quarter.

how's that for an example ?

just my twenty cents worth.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jan 19, 05 at 22:44

And a paradox is a couple of quackers... or maybe quacks.

Pinetree,
I think "God bless" is supposed to be shorthand for "May God bless you." More wishful-hopeful (as John said) than presumptive or a command to the supreme being. It's like saying "May the wind always be at your back."


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Michelle,

A nickle short of a quarter is a better explaination than I have gotten a lot of times. I made the mistake (delightfully so) of asking a plant manager what "paradigm" meant after he had used it, perhaps a dozen times, during an all-employee company meeting.

He was up front pontificating to "us peons" and wound up delegating that question to one of his yes-men after much, "Umm-ahh -- Well, umm-ahh -- Ummm ... Jack. You want to take that one?" I think he would have preferred that I had told him his zipper was down.

IronBelly


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

The expression that is driving me absolutely crazy because almost everyone uses it incorrectly is "beg the question." This phrase has been everywhere the last year or two. People use it to mean that something has forced a certain question to be asked. That is completely wrong.

To beg the question is a phrase I learned when studying logic in college. It means to answer a question with information that is already contained in the question, thus giving no answer to the question.

While that may sound confusing, just listen to any presidential (any party) press conference, or even the coach's press conference after a big game. Examples of "begging the question" will pop out all over.

I fear I am fighting a losing battle on this one. Solution: Require the study of logic and rhetoric in every high school. When pigs fly, huh?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by John_D USDA 8b WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 20, 05 at 14:43

IB:
That reminds me of the time I listened to a guy who confused "paradigm" with "paragon."


 o
begging the question

Gee Ginny, that's not quite what I thought the phrase meant, so I checked dictionary.com. I'm fairly sure that their definition is nearly correct, but that their example mis-uses the phrase. Then again maybe I'm just losing it.

Take for granted or assume the truth of the very thing being questioned. For example, Shopping now for a dress to wear to the ceremony is really begging the question, she hasn't been invited yet.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

During the hurricane season in the U. S. the newscasters kept telling people to "hunker down". Oh, that is a phrase I don't want to hear again too soon.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Live oak lady.... you just hit on one of my favourites; I picked up on it from those very same US newscasters in the hurricane season down South. Tonight (though not hurricane weather) is a snowy, blowy one in southern Ontario and it's free- e- -e- -e- zing cold! So this is a perfect night to "hunker down". In fact, last night I happened to be home alone and my body must have been able to sense a storm coming and I didn't just hunker down, I literally started to hibernate...I fell asleep on the sofa right after supper at 6 p.m. and didn't wake up till bedtime. Today I didn't get up till nearly noon. I wonder if other people around here in the deep freeze are doing that too? Lately, I can't get enough of that expression...such a treat to indulge oneself and be lazy for a change.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

"Oh Yeah" I guess you had to be there, but remember when this used to mean exactly that, as in "Oh yeah, .wed better defrost the fridge"?, or "Oh yeah..did you hear that joke?".

Later on, as I recall, this expression (somehow) slipped innocuously into the bedroom, these two words apparently transcending the need for further conversation at that crucial moment of self-realization that we all know starts with O.

Well it appears that now (dont ask me how) we even have that oft used and worn out phrase in the kitchen too. On one of the Saturday cooking shows I recently overheard on TV, the cook was so incensed in enticing the viewers to watch her mouthwatering slips of this and slops of that, that she gave me an extreme case of the belly ache! She was answering her own questions, eg. "Isnt this sauce so thick, rich and sweet? Oh yeah", or "Doesnt this make you want to sink your teeth into this juicy fat dripping chicken leg? Oh yeah".it was almost like the scene "yes yes yes" as in that movie "When Harry Met Sally" only not nearly as cute. This begs the question, "Am I heading for the gun cabinet?".. Oh yeah!


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Hi, everyone, just tuned in and laughed my way through this thread. My alltime most hated ubiquitous word? "Absolutely!" This poor word has been rendered useless by idiots who who apparently don't have a clue that what they're putting their important little stamp of approval on is by no means absolute and often clearly not. I am now so allergic to this good word that I avoid its use altogether.

Others? How about "hero?" Along with "tragedy" "hero" has been done to death by an illiterate media that obviously never bothered with the classic definitions of those words. "Healing process" never fails to raise the hair on the back of my neck. Don't these people understand that verbs with "ing" are describing a process? Running, eating, gardening, healing. They're all doing something. "God bless America" always leaves me wondering: Whose God? Ours? Theirs? And why not, "God bless this world with peace."

On the lighter side, "Oh, yeah" doesn't grate quite as badly on me as the Rachel woman on HGTV who constantly moans, "Oh, man."

Others: "Family values," "24/7," "orientate," "preventative," ... the list goes on. I don't have a gun. Good thing.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Im thinking "MANDATE" when you are looking at a couple of percentage points in what could be a contested process.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 27, 05 at 16:36

Speaking of (tired and irritating) lines used in the kitchen, am I the only one who is noticing an increase in the use of TV cook Emiril Lagasse's "Kick it up another notch" catch phrase? It seems as though more and more people are using it in situations outside Lagasse's cooking program.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Oh, for irritating, let's not forget "BOO-WAH!" accompanied by the clenched fist drawn downward. Where the h*ll did that come from anyway?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

I came across this article I had clipped out of the paper a few months ago:

(To be honest its, like, annoying

~~~ BRITAIN ~~~

AT THE END of the day there was no competition.

The most irritating phrase in the English language, nominated by straight talkers around the world, has been identified as that staple of the soccer managers post-match interview.

"At the end of the day" was a clear winner over "at this moment in time" in a poll of 5000 members of the Plain English Campaign.

As part of its 25th anniversary, the organization compiled a top 10 of the most hackneyed expressions in the language. In third place was a four-letter word used as, like, a form of punctuation.

Other phrases that caused widespread annoyance included "with all due respect" (number four) and "to be honest" (five).

Those stock phrases of the corporate world "lets touch base" (six) and "blue sky thinking"(10) also drew the ire of those who prefer to say what they mean.
"I hear what youre saying" and "absolutely" were also in the top 10.

"These phrases are used so often they are used without thinking," said John Lister, a spokesman for the Plain English Campaign. When readers come across tired expressions like these, they tune out and completely miss the message."

But the worst offenders are not confined to English. "We have members in over 70 countries and they say the same irritating phrases appear in their languages too," Mr. Lister said.)

~ Daily Telegraph ~


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

We may have exhausted the 2004 vault hottie so lets start on 2005. So far the most irritating word, and this is my final answer, has to be 'dilettante'. I dislike it because there is a perfectly good English word (dabbler) that serves better. Someone who visits a lot of different forums here on the Gw and adds inconsequential one liners would be a dabbler, someone who did this with pretention, I guess would be a dilettante.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Herb Victoria, B.C. (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 6, 05 at 15:01

"Dabbler" may be a good word for some purposes, but when I've seen "dilettante" used, it's been entirely apropos. There are other instances where "poseur" would fit even better.

One of our radio talk show hosts always describes regular happenings as being "on a daily basis", "on a monthly basis" and so on. Everything's "on a...basis" What's wrong with "every day"?

As well we keep hearing "period of time". What's wrong with just "period"? Why not just "time" or "a while"?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Good points.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

For those not up to speed that is a perfect example of dabbling John, thankyou.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Herb Victoria, B.C. (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 6, 05 at 19:46

John wasn't dabbling - he was showing that he understood perfectly - as I think, do you, Inky.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

The most irratating expressions for me are included in a series of popular book titles: "______for Dummies", "____for Idiots" and "KISS (Keep it Simple Stupid)".

Why does anyone want to buy guide books that assume they are dummies, idiots or stupid? Twenty years ago one of my teachers was saddened by the deliberate systemic "dumbing down" f society. I didn't know what he was talking about then, but now I get it and I hope it stops.

Sharon


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Arbor z8/Oregon (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 8, 05 at 13:42

I agree Sharon, and was chagrined to discover they really do simplify things that are obfuscated elsewhere.

I hate "TMI" for "too much information." It's a lovely way of humiliating someone who has divulged something personal and delicate. Not to say that it isn't true sometimes, but surely there is a better response.

Others that make me want to drink gin out of the cat dish:
- at this point in time
- due to the fact that
- "download" used to mean giving someone else information verbally
- anyword modified with "shizzle" or "-izzle"
- "bling bling"


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

>I hate "TMI" for "too much information."

Actually, I hate it whenever people use a TLA, especially when I don't know what it stands for. Best thing to do in that situation is to say "Wait, what does that TLA stand for?" because then THEY have to ask YOU what your Three Letter Acronym means, and that gets you one point.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

The votes are coming in for the upcoming annual nonsense word contest, as we speak. On Thursday evening, whilst 'vegging out' in front of the goggle tube (old grey eye) I heard an expert on CSI refer to the "directionality of the bullet". So my entry is "directionality".


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

directionality sounds like a made up word by someone wanting to sound like an expert..There's that CSI acronym again.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

If you had done something about it proactively it wouldn't have impacted your bottom line at the end of the day.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Have you noticed a revolting tendency to put "out" after a verb that does not need it? Examples: "I have to change out this light bulb." "The room would look better if we changed out the wallpaper." I noticed it first on HGTV but now am hearing it elsewhere. Ugh.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 15, 05 at 17:31

Annoying, but not and expression:

Making little quotation marks in the air with one's fingers, as in, "So, how was your little [makes quotation marks in the air with index and middle fingers of left and right hands) DATE with Susan?"


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by John_D USDA 8b WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 15, 05 at 19:48

I'm happy to say I have neither heard nor seen either one of these -- yet.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

At a recent meeting at the software company where I work, a question was asked of someone in Marketing, who responded: "Let's double-click on that..."

But I have to ask: Arbor, what is gin doing in the cat dish?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

"Needless to say" followed by the needless thing being said.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

And its variation, "To make a long story short", long, long after the story has been very long indeed.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

I've had a vendetta against "impacted" for ages. "The funeral industry has been impacted by this new paradigm." No, prizefighters impact you. End of story.

Rosefiend.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

We now are getting into sign language.It galls me when people think it is so cute when they mention the word telephone with the telephone sign;2 fingers up with one near the ear and one near the mouth. My older daughter was trying to use it and got two wrong fingers up. Really funny.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 22, 05 at 20:29

If you're going to start on "impacted," then I will add my gripe: wisdom teeth can be impacted, but everything else has an impact on something else, or receives the "impact" . Meteors may disintegrate upon impact with the Earth, but they don't "impact" the Earth.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

"Going forward" is the one that makes me grimace every time.

People who speak in cliches and mixed metaphors (usually because they don't have anything substantive to say and are filling the air with noise). Especially people who use the same cliches all the time -- yet another reason to prefer the company of dogs.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by John_D USDA 8b WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Feb 23, 05 at 16:44

How to you speak to dogs? In dog latin?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Feb 23, 05 at 18:51

Well, now you're throwing the baby out with the eggs in one basket.


 o
Another annoying term RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 25, 05 at 10:51

The term "vetting" is also really incredibly irritating. It's used to describe the process of testing or evaluating a potential employee, strategy or idea. Example: "We're vetting a new manager to see how he hands internal sales."

The word seems to have been stolen from the process of having a veterinarian examine a horse, dog or other animal for a potential buyer, to make sure there are no hidden health or conformation problems with it.

For some reason, the use of "vet" and "vetting" in regards to humans or human ventures is revolting to me. Perhaps the term is appropriate in the context of describing drug-testing and physical exams required of potential employees... if they happen to be chimps or guard dogs.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Herb Victoria, B.C. (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 25, 05 at 13:12

Cady -
Your comment on 'vetting' is intriguing. Compare it with expressions like 'doctoring the books' or 'nursing a grievance'. Is it any wonder that idiomatic expressions can so confuse foreigners?
Herb


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 25, 05 at 13:19

Herb,

At least "doctoring" and "nursing" are professions practiced humans. "Vetting" is for critters.

Actually, I think "nursing" in the context you provided refers to its roots in breast feeding -- as in feeding and nurturing in the traditional sense, not medical. ;)


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Herb Victoria, B.C. (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 26, 05 at 13:03

Cady - I guess you're probably right about the origin of 'nursing' in that context - it hadn't occurred to me.

Nursing a grievance is not a good thing. Some people would say say it sucks - though that isn't an expression I like either!

Herb


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

I received a business communication today offering help with my issues. When ever someone asks about my issues I start to head for my stack of old newpapers. I am confused. I guess I need someone to facilitate me!


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Herb Victoria, B.C. (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 27, 05 at 12:56

When I was a kid we had no running water or electricity. We also had an outdoor shed with a hole in the ground. We used to keep a stack of old newspapers in it to deal with our issues.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 27, 05 at 16:02

I thought that those old newspapers were to deal with your tissues...


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Petra 8TX HillCountry (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 28, 05 at 20:33

I HATE "this rocks", "you rock", and one I've heard off and on, "you rock the Casbah". What the heck does that mean anyway ?? And if I hear "you go girl" one more time, I think I'll scream.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 1, 05 at 12:36

Yeah, "I hear ya" (another pet irritating expression).

While we're talking about "girls," I wish journalists and other writers would stop using "woman" as an adjective (e.g. "woman lawyer," "woman senator"). No one says "man nurse" or "man mayor." It seems that those who are not at the top of the power structure (that is, anyone other than an adult male), gets resigned to being an adjective ("child prodigy," "boy wonder," "girl/gal Friday," "woman president.").


 o
Oops RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 1, 05 at 12:37

Didn't intend to put "girl/gal Friday" on that list, as it doesn't belong there. It belongs on a different list entirely. :)


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Herb Victoria, B.C. (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 1, 05 at 22:47

True, few people say "man nurse" but they do (or used to) say "male nurse". As for "woman" I've often heard "fishwife" and "midwife" but never "fishwoman" or "midwoman". And, when it comes to "landlady" I've never heard of "landwoman" (nor of "landman" for "landlord"). We hear of a man being a "womanizer" but never of him being a "ladyizer". We have barmen and not barwomen or barladies, but barmaids. I even remember that the feminine version of "tailor" used to be "tailoress": It was considered to be quite the equal of "tailor" and a distinct step up from mere "dressmaker".

There must be lots of other examples. What I don't understand is the current obsession with changing them all. I mean it's absurd to drop "cleaning woman" and substitute "cleaning lady" but at the same time to happily use "policewoman" . Ever heard "policelady"?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Hmmm? Personhole cover for manhole cover? That's us, carry everything to the politically correct extreme.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 4, 05 at 12:27

Herb, "wife" actually means "woman" in Middle English ("wif"). So, "wifery" in my book is perfectly okay.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Herb Victoria, B.C. (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 5, 05 at 0:56

Cady - I've never heard the word "wifery" as such - only in the compound "midwifery". "Midwifery" as a word is fine with me - though when I checked the dictionary, I was surprised to read that it not only means a woman who assists another woman during childbirth, but also includes a man who (in the admittedly rare instance) renders the same assistance.

Coming back to irritating expressions, I heard two on the radio this morning -

"she was like" - meaning she said, or she kept saying- and "you know" . The speaker used these repeatedly - in almost every sentence and many times each minute.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 5, 05 at 10:30

Um...like...I mean, ya know... is probably as old as North American English.

I used "wifery" facetiously, meaning (in my mind) the use of the word "wife" in place of "woman." Maybe "midwifery" is literally the "woman in the middle" between the birthing mother and the baby being birthed.

The use of "lady" instead of "woman" is one of those classist things. Ladies and gentlemen were supposed to be those individuals rendered docile and polite by upbringing. There were expectations for behavior assigned to woman and man in the higher social classes.

Somehow, though, the use extended to the "common" folk such as us. My elementary school teachers exhorted the pupils to "behave like young ladies and gentlemen," meaning that we were expected to adhere to a set of etiquette and behavioral rules in keeping with whatever is considered civil in a democratic republic. :)

It seems, though, that "lady" has gone farther beyond that still. The word is used to pin and corner women into behaving within strictures of etiquette that men (guys, dudes) are not. To be called a lady means that you are expected to be polite, submissive and to know your place. Unless a man is similarly pegged with the term "gentleman," he is not bound to those social expectations.

In other words, "lady" is meant as a status-reducer. Instead of being able to be a thoroughly human "woman," females must maintain "ladylike" demeanor even when it is to their disadvantage.

To be a woman, and to be called a woman, should hold the same status as to be a man, and to be called a man. "You'll be a man, my son." (Kipling) "Walk like a man, talk like a man..." (Frankie Valley). Compare that to "She always knows her place...She's a lady....Whoa-whoa-whoa" (Tom Jones) and "Act like a lady." "She's no lady..."

Bah. Let us just be women.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Herb Victoria, B.C. (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 5, 05 at 17:13

I wonder what (if any) implications the old (and I think, better) expression for "waitress" carries? I don't like many of the -ess (e.g. laundress, stewardess, hostess) endings simply because they're derived from the French. Instead of "waitress" is there perhaps something to be said for the old expression "serving wench"?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 5, 05 at 23:00

Then, there's the Latin with masculine and feminine forms (e.g. aviator, aviatrix). Maybe we could go that route... "Waitrix, check please!" :)

I was always puzzled by the use of "ess" at the end of big-cat family names to denote females -- lioness, leopardess. A lion is a lion, whatever its sex.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Herb Victoria, B.C. (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 5, 05 at 23:18

Reverting for a minute to "lady" it used to be considered so gross to use the word "b*tch" - and apparently it's still so, because Garden web refused to accept the full spelling, so I had to use the asterisk - that some people couldn't bring themselves to use it even for a female dog. So they used to refer to them as "lady dogs". (Not, you will not, "woman dogs".) Aren't language conventions strange?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Apr 6, 05 at 9:43

That sounds like a Victorian-era convention. During that period, even such mundane items as table legs were referred to as table "limbs" because the word "leg" was considered too sexually charged. I believe that was because women's legs were covered to the ankle, and thus were treated as objects of mystery and sexuality.

Heh. You're right. Language conventions are odd.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

I just think it's cool that a person called Petra doesn't like rock phrases. Get it? Petra = rock? You go! That resonates with me! Mandate that paradigm! Hoo-ah!

*I'm* going to get impacted if I keep this up ....


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Once, when young, I used the term lady to refer to a woman and my grandmother arched an eyebrow and asked what exactly was this woman's full title. For that reason, and because of the prissy, pretensious, fake-genteel associations around lady I like using the term gentlewoman. On a good day I am a gentlewoman. Thankfully, I am never, ever a lady.

No one is mentioning the class associations with these words. This is my take, which is of course idiocyncratic:

Lady is what lower, working and middle class girls are told to be when people want to control their behaviour.

Princess is what middle and upper class girls are called by guys who can't get anywhere with them (and who want to control their behaviour.)

Gentlewoman is a term for any female who respects and cares for herself and others

May God bless any of you who read this with amusement or pleasure, or who just plain know they can use any blessing they can get (which is my own usual, grateful response to be being blessed.)

Springcherry


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 7, 05 at 11:43

Springcherry, I only mentioned "classist" once, but what you wrote was precisely my point -- class association as a form of behavorial control over women (and men, as "gentleman" has behavioral connotations, too). "Lady" was a title (like "Dame") that carried a burdon of behavior and duty expectations.

Beyond aristocracy, the word was adopted and adapted for a parallel set of expectations for female behavior and "state of being." Ladies of the aristocracy were put on pedestals and bound in class shackels at the same time.

Remember the addage: "Horses sweat, women perspire, ladies glow."


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

And gardeners stinketh like sh*t.
(Its hard to be lady-like when covered with dirt:-)

Springcherry


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 8, 05 at 15:01

Of course, a true lady of the aristocratic world would never, ever "soil" her hands by touching dirt (with or without kidskin gloves). That's what hired gardeners are for.

Though she might sprinkle roses with water from a delicate little watering can.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Oh yeah, and while I'm on the subject, and since we've just had the hottest June on record down here in Southern Ontario, and "I'm lovin' it", here is my latest 'pet peeve' in the expression category.

Are you ready for it?

It's "This is God's Country". It's said when one is referring to a stretch of land the speaker lives in or stakes some kind of claim to belong to etc. Well folks, I've got news for you: I've been damn lucky to have visited (and continue to search out) more places in the world than many people will ever dream of seeing, and all and each of them are capable of being called "God's Country" for many reasons. You may feel you're in "God's Country" because the air is fresh and clean, because you have rivers and wildlife and miles and miles of wide open spaces and you may have a point. But a country is what it is - just a "country". It's all "God's country" really isn't it? And anyway, wherever you are, isn't it the "country of your mind" - the place you live in every second of every day -infinitely more deserving of the expression? I don't know why I mention this but I felt like throwing it in. I have a suggestion for you - next time you have a toast, say "Here's to God's Country" wherever you may be, and get out and enjoy it and quit watchin' TV.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Actually we in the Southern Hemisphere prefer 'Godzone'....

There's no need to squabble. Just go through the 'reconciliation process, reach closure, and get on with our lives.'

Ha!


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Dude! Can we, like, ya know, please have some of 2010's most irritating expressions too?


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

I just found this forum, all I have to say is VFF! Very Freakin' Funny.


 o
RE: Most irritating expressions in 2004

Awesome! (Most annoying since 2000. )


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Garden Writers Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here